6

I am wondering what is the best way to deal with questions that have a problematic MCVE. And by problematic, i mean a MCVE that is any of the following: incomplete, logically incoherent, unrelated to the question, does something different than intended and so on.

Is it appropriate for me to edit the MCVE in the question when possible?

Or would this be seen as conflicting with the OP's original intent? I am asking because this is an important consideration when deciding whether to accept or reject a suggested edit in the peer-review process.

I would appreciate any advice you may have on this issue.

  • 12
    If it's not compete, it's not MCVE... more like ME or just E. – user6655984 May 25 '18 at 21:51
  • 2
    @user4412195 I agree but the reality is that lots of users do not pay equal attention to all aspects of an MCVE. – Pearly Spencer May 25 '18 at 21:57
  • 1
    Note that not all questions require an MCVE. Sometimes, it's impractical. Sometimes, it's not possible. For debugging-style questions, it's almost always a requirement. So whether or not you should answer is question-dependent. – jpp May 25 '18 at 23:13
  • 3
    @jpp Agreed. But here i am referring to questions that need a MCVE and i am asking/debating whether i should edit the MCVE if this is inadequate or perhaps include one of mine in my answer (if possible). – Pearly Spencer May 26 '18 at 1:58
  • 2
    IMHO if you understand the OP's intent well enough to edit the purported MCVE, then the question is answerable and can be left to be answered (by yourself or someone else). – Joe May 26 '18 at 22:17
29

Vote to close the question.

If the MCVE is not complete for the reasons you list - namely, incompleteness, logical incoherence, or of no relation to the question - it by definition cannot be an MCVE. There's no reason to expend extra energy to bridge the gap by the OP in this context.

  • Thank you for your contribution. I meant any of the reasons, not necessarily all of them at the same time. I have now clarified this in my question. – Pearly Spencer May 25 '18 at 22:38
  • 1
    @PearlySpencer: My answer doesn't change in face of that; any one of those reasons is enough to disqualify an MCVE from being "complete". – Makoto May 25 '18 at 22:40
  • 3
    Even if the rest of the question is interesting and makes sense? Isn't that a bit harsh, especially if the OP is a newbie? – Pearly Spencer May 25 '18 at 22:47
  • 11
    No, it's not harsh. If they're not giving us enough information to help solve their problem, then everything else about the question is immaterial. – Makoto May 25 '18 at 22:50
  • 1
    @PearlySpencer Remember -- closed questions can be reopened. If you want, guide the OP how to fix their question in the comment section, and then VTRO/retract close vote when it's clear enough. – user202729 May 26 '18 at 3:30
  • 4
    Yes, I'll vote to close, and someone else will take a half-baked stab at it and get upvoted 5 times. Questions that should be closed don't get closed fast enough, and that's sad. – cs95 May 26 '18 at 22:43
10

As others have pointed out, an MCVE is not some "golden quality standard" for questions. Rather, it's information that's absolutely required for it to be possible to answer the question.

So, a question with a "problematic "MCVE"" is impossible to answer and thus close-worthy for this reason.

Vote to close them with the "lacks an MCVE" reason.

  • 1
    A lack of MCVE doesn't make an answer "impossible", just harder. For instance, if it's non-minimal, it just takes more work on the part of the answerer. – Steve Bennett May 27 '18 at 4:34
  • 2
    @SteveBennettㄹ No, it makes it impossible to answer as-is because it requires further input from the OP to understand what they want. Otherwise, you can't answer, you can only make a guess about what they want, in the hopes that you guess right. – ivan_pozdeev May 27 '18 at 4:40
  • 1
    @SteveBennettㄹ This is not good enough for SO: "Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers.", so such a question is not worth keeping on the site, whether it gets answered or not. – ivan_pozdeev May 27 '18 at 4:44
  • I'm not disagreeing that MVCEs are better than VCEs. But you did say "impossible". – Steve Bennett May 27 '18 at 5:45
6

And by problematic, I mean an MCVE that is any of the following: incomplete, logically incoherent, unrelated to the question, does something different than intended and so on.

In all of those cases, the "problematic MCVE" is (in fact) not an MCVE at all.

  1. "incomplete" - The C in MCVE means complete.

  2. "logically incoherent" - The V in MCVE means verifiable. An incoherent example is not verifiable.

  3. "unrelated to the question" - The E in MCVE means example. If the code is unrelated to the question, it is not an example of what the question is asking.

  4. "does something different than intended" - This is a little unclear. But if you mean that it does something different to what the Question is asking, then either it is not an example, or it is not verifiable.

If the problems in the MCVE are minor, they can be ignored.

However, the purpose of the MCVE is to allow people to understand the question enough to be able to answer. So if a question needs an MCVE to be answerable, and the supposed MCVE is in fact not an MCVE (i.e. it is "problematic"), then the Question should be closed as requiring a (real) MCVE.


Is it appropriate for me to edit the MCVE in the question when possible?

If you are sure that it doesn't materially change the question that the OP is / was trying to ask, then I think it is appropriate. Especially for an old question.

But the fact that you think that the MCVE is problematic suggests that that is not the case.

Or would this be seen as conflicting with the OP's original intent?

It depends. See above. It boils down to the above. If you are not sure that you understand the OP's intent, don't fix the question. Closure is an appropriate alternative.

Another alternative is to answer the question like this:

"Your question is a bit unclear, but assuming that you mean X Y Z, then ..."

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .