3

There is a question on Stack Overflow which has an accepted answer which was right, but for quite a while has been wrong.

Updates were added to the answer to point out that this is the case, but the majority of the answer still shows the wrong way of doing things and the update is easy to overlook.

In my opinion, the answer would be more valuable if it had, at the top a line such as:

N.B. See updates.

How acceptable is it to significantly change the meaning of an answer when you are not the OP?

How extreme an edit is acceptable?

Answer in question.

2

I'm no Python expert at all, but I'll use the example you provided to make my point:

You should edit this answer so that it becomes a coherent story, not slap yet another marker onto it.


The answer currently reads:

A requirement file can contain comments (#) and can include some other files (--requirement or -r). Thus, if you really want to parse a requirements.txt you should use the pip parser:

from pip.req import parse_requirements

# parse_requirements() returns generator of pip.req.InstallRequirement objects
install_reqs = parse_requirements(<requirements_path>)

# reqs is a list of requirement
# e.g. ['django==1.5.1', 'mezzanine==1.4.6']
reqs = [str(ir.req) for ir in install_reqs]

setup(
    ...
    install_requires=reqs
)

UPDATE: my answer is old now. Pip does not have a public API so this no longer works (e.g. parse_requirements now requires an instance of pip.download.PipSession). You can do the opposite: list the dependencies in setup.py and have a single character -- a dot . -- in requirements.txt.

UPDATE2: even if not advised, it is still possible to parse requirements.txt file that doesn't refer any external requirements by URL with the following hack (tested with pip 9.0.1):

install_reqs = parse_requirements('requirements.txt', session='hack')

This doesn't filter environment markers though.

 

How about something like this instead?

You can list the dependencies in setup.py and have a single character — a dot . — in requirements.txt.


Alternatively, even if not advised, it is still possible to parse the requirements.txt file (if it doesn't refer any external requirements by URL) with the following hack (tested with pip 9.0.1):

install_reqs = parse_requirements('requirements.txt', session='hack')

This doesn't filter environment markers though.


In old versions of pip, more specifically older than 6.0, there is a public API that can be used to achieve this. A requirement file can contain comments (#) and can include some other files (--requirement or -r). Thus, if you really want to parse a requirements.txt you can use the pip parser:

from pip.req import parse_requirements

# parse_requirements() returns generator of pip.req.InstallRequirement objects
install_reqs = parse_requirements(<requirements_path>)

# reqs is a list of requirement
# e.g. ['django==1.5.1', 'mezzanine==1.4.6']
reqs = [str(ir.req) for ir in install_reqs]

setup(
    ...
    install_requires=reqs
)

I know I'd prefer the latter version.


To concretely answer the questions you pose:

How acceptable is it to significantly change the meaning of an answer when you are not the OP?

This is in general not acceptable. The original intent of an answer should always be maintained. You'll see in practice however that users tend to edit addendums into answers, adding to the knowledge shared by the OP. Given how widespread that practice is, I think it's safe to say that is acceptable.

How extreme an edit is acceptable?

I've seen some very extreme edits, layout-wise. Those were mostly1 acceptable. The same holds for edits touching essentially every sentence of a question or answer, fixing spelling and grammar mistakes. For other types of edits, it is harder to say what is acceptable and what is not. You'll find that this is a gray area, where there is no consensus about what exactly is acceptable anymore.

I'd recommend you to edit in such a way that you feel the post is improved. You'll learn and change what you think is acceptable editing only by doing it (a lot).


Related reading: when/how to update an obsolete answer.

 

________

1 Some edits introduce nonsensical layout, such as formatting HTML as HTML. That's not acceptable.

  • for me, whilst I agree the latter is a better example, is it really better to completely change the structure of the answer? – NDevox May 22 '18 at 12:02
  • 1
    I strongly believe that changing the order of presentation in an answer can significantly improve it, and that edits doing so are welcome. I added a link to a related answer where the community seems to agree with that viewpoint. – Just a student May 22 '18 at 12:35
  • 1
    Alright you've convinced me. Thanks for keeping the story coherent ;-) – NDevox May 22 '18 at 13:08

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