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Some questions I see have accepted answers with other answers that are far more detailed and efficient.

Would it be appropriate to appeal this in that case?

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    It's up to the OP to award the checkmark. It is their choice, up to and including not awarding it at all. It's fine to educate someone new to SO on how accepting works, but that's about it. Don't fall into the trap of expecting it to be your right to be given the accepted answer mark. – Martijn Pieters May 19 '18 at 18:28
  • Certainly not! I just ask because some answers take a lot of time. And in the event they are an objectively better answer...well, you can see where I'm coming from. Thanks! – Aaron Brandhagen May 19 '18 at 18:32
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    Remember that you'll be naturally biased towards your answer being better! But again, it's still not your choice which answer is awarded! Instead of answering for the check mark, answer for the future visitor that has the same problem. Aim for long-term usefulness, and you'll be rewarded with upvotes over time. – Martijn Pieters May 19 '18 at 18:35
  • That's great advice, good perspective. Thanks man. – Aaron Brandhagen May 19 '18 at 18:36
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    Popularity has never been a decent substitute for correctness. – Hans Passant May 19 '18 at 18:36
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  • Popularity? Nah. Just the perks that come with a higher rep. – Aaron Brandhagen May 19 '18 at 18:37
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    @AaronBrandhagen On smaller sites, there is often an active effort to respond to quick acceptances by the asker with comments that say 'thanks, and it's your right to accept, but we typically recommend waiting 24 hours before accepting an answer, to encourage more people to contribute great answers' or something along those lines. It doesn't happen on Stack Overflow likely because there are just way too many questions to keep up with. – TylerH May 19 '18 at 18:41
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    I really really dont understand why not even one out of those 12 (at least 12) down voters left a comment with the reason for the down vote. Its really annoying and people dont realize that there is no hope for improvement in such case after all one can only learn from mistakes. – Rishav May 20 '18 at 9:28
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    @Rishav It just means that people are answering "no" to this "should I?" question. It is a common way to vote here on Meta but it does have the unfortunate effect of hiding the question as well as sending potentially confusing signals to the OP. – TylerH May 20 '18 at 13:18
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    @TylerH Interesting observation -- I don't think I have ever seen anyone spell that out in any of the downvotes-on-Meta discussions I have seen. On Meta, downvoting for lack of research can be okay (if a full answer to the question is indeed easy to find), and downvoting for disagreement sometimes makes sense (if the question involves a feature request or advances a thesis). However, I'd say that downvoting as a way to answer "no" in other cases is flat out wrong, even on Meta. – duplode May 20 '18 at 13:38
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    @AaronBrandhagen "no" is a statement. And no, neither you nor I "absolutely know" why the downvoters downvoted. You can't know unless all 11 people come in and own up to their reasoning here. – TylerH May 20 '18 at 13:47
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    @AaronBrandhagen I would advise that you not take the score of your question so personally. Meta votes do not affect your reputation or your ability to ask questions on the main site at all. Even if 11 people think your question lacked research or was low quality... so what? They don't bother to explain why or provide a way to improve, so just ignore that. I mean even the CEO of the company has asked questions and posted answers here that have gotten hundreds of negative votes. You got a good answer and a decent amount of healthy discussion under the question... that is a win in my book. – TylerH May 20 '18 at 15:07
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    @TylerH you're right. I need to pump the breaks a bit. Thanks. – Aaron Brandhagen May 20 '18 at 15:39
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    @Aaron comments by their very nature are meant to be ephemereal and deleted at a whim. Someone posting a comment should be aware that if it gets removed, it doesn't matter. If someone posts an answer they intend to add to our long lasting repository of knowledge in a permanent way. You shouldn't have the unilateral power over that (especially when 11 members of the community upvoted that answer, indicating they see value in it) – Patrice May 20 '18 at 15:40
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No, it is never appropriate to solicit for the accepted answer checkmark. Such comments should be flagged as noise and such content in posts should be edited out. It is the asker's prerogative to pick the answer that helped them the most and/or solved their problem.

When it comes to answers of your own competing with an existing accepted answer, if you have some constructive criticism or important flaw to point out in a competing answer, feel free to do so via comments. But don't say "this is not as good as my answer" even if your answer is better and everyone agrees with you.

Likewise you can also refer to the other answer(s) in your post by pointing out some shortcomings or problems in them (if such things exist). It is okay to say in your answer something like "I didn't feel like the accepted answer was efficient/elegant enough, so here is my attempt, which differs by" etc.

If OP comments on a post saying "thanks, this solved my problem" and they simply haven't picked an answer as the accepted answer yet, then do feel free to nudge them in a comment asking to accept that answer, even if it's yours. Just don't do multiple times, and once they have done so, be sure to go back and delete the comment.

  • "ikewise you can also refer to the other answer(s) in your post by pointing out some shortcomings or problems in them (if such things exist). It is okay to say in your answer something like "I didn't feel like the accepted answer was efficient/elegant enough, so here is my attempt, which differs by" etc. " great point. – Aaron Brandhagen May 19 '18 at 18:47

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