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I want to ask a question that seems to be in the middle of legal stack exchange and stack overflow. Namely, if its legal to have a PHP file return a string of a news feed (i.e. top stories) of one website and have it returned to build a similar widget on my local website.

  • I am not monetizing the app/widget in any way
  • I'd prefer not to have a glaring in-widget "bibliography" to cite the original source
  • I'd be curious to know what is the minimum legally required citing format for scraping external data and feeding into one's own widget

Question: Would this question be on topic at SO? What tags would be best suited for it?

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    I doubt if that is on-topic on SO or anywhere else as it would boil down to giving you personal legal advice. That is also off-limits on law.se. Hire a lawyer or call the lawyer of the website you plan to get the feed from.
    – rene
    Commented May 12, 2018 at 15:04
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    @rene I guess that's what it comes down to... (sad trombone sound) Commented May 12, 2018 at 15:05
  • Out of interest, why would you prefer not to have a “bibliography” to cite your sources? Just say “News from Reuters <link>”, it isn’t that obtrusive. All it does it prevent people from giving you credit for someone else’s work.
    – Dan Bron
    Commented May 12, 2018 at 17:25
  • @DanBron Yeah I'm not opposed to that in principle. The key word is "glaring". I just don't want a glaring bibliography. I'm not sure if it should be done in under the feed or in the feed or as a tooltip. Maybe it's about aesthetic preference or maybe there is a convention already. Commented May 12, 2018 at 17:28
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    IANAL but I don't see what the problem with that would be. Google does it. Provided you're linking to the article, or otherwise making it clear that this is not your content, why would a news org be opposed to the free publicity?
    – Michael
    Commented May 14, 2018 at 9:24
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    IANAL either, but (for balance) I think it would be a breach of copyright by default, unless the website's terms and conditions explicitly allowed republishing their content or you had permission. Free Publicity on one hand, lost advertising revenue on the other! Just reinforces that you need to ask a good lawyer.
    – JeffUK
    Commented May 14, 2018 at 9:38
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    read the terms of service on the sites you plan to scrape. Commented May 14, 2018 at 20:08
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    Since Reuters was already brought up as an example; they have a page listing their RSS feeds reuters.com/tools/rss, which also includes the terms of service for said feed. Many (Most?) news agencies have(used to have) similar setups.
    – visibleman
    Commented May 15, 2018 at 4:54
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    I find this very refreshingly honest and thoughtful - your whole approach about making sure your questions are on topic, and how you are going about this particular question. Well done.
    – user4843530
    Commented May 15, 2018 at 5:57
  • Thats not a code technique. Its functionality. A code technique is HOW you implement something, which in this case would have no bearing on the output. You may or may not be breaching copyright, but thats completely off topic for SO.
    – JK.
    Commented May 15, 2018 at 23:56

1 Answer 1

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We can't provide legal advice in this capacity. You should seek counsel out and ask them these questions. Besides, you wouldn't want to take legal advice from random strangers on the internet living in completely different jurisdictions, anyway.

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    'Besides, you wouldn't want to take legal advice from random strangers on the internet living in completely different jurisdictions, anyway.' - I mean, what could possibly go wrong I wonder.
    – Script47
    Commented May 12, 2018 at 16:28
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    'Besides, you wouldn't want to take legal advice from random strangers on the internet living in completely different jurisdictions, anyway.' (sad trombone sound) Commented May 12, 2018 at 16:29
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    I love how confident everyone is that no one should ever seek legal advice from anyone except lawyers. But in reality, we all do this, all the time. It just depends how much is at stake. Commented May 15, 2018 at 4:18
  • At least we seek some legal advice, unlike many who don't understand computers as well.
    – rassa45
    Commented May 15, 2018 at 5:08

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