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About this 2015 question: "My Xcode installation is taking up loads of space; how to reduce space used by simulators?"

  • is it on-topic on SO? If yes, how so? (it has +10/0 upvotes). How did it manage to escape being migrated/closed?
  • should it be migrated to AskDifferent?
  • or else SuperUser?

(Also it doesn't specify either an XCode version or MacOS version. This matters because answers discuss directory sizes under /Library, ~/Library, /Applications, which Apple has been changing around in recent releases. Just because an answer solved an issue back in 2015, it may not even be correct or relevant today. Not having version numbers makes it harder to determine if this is even still an issue)

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is it on-topic on SO?

Yes.

If yes, how so?

Xcode is an IDE - a tool specifically for programming - and this is a question about Xcode. It's therefore on-topic under the clause at https://stackoverflow.com/help/on-topic that says:

if your question generally covers…

  • [bla], or
  • [bla], or
  • software tools commonly used by programmers; and is
  • a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development

… then you’re in the right place to ask your question!

To your remaining points:

should it be migrated to AskDifferent? or else SuperUser?

It shouldn't be migrated because: 1. It's on-topic here, and 2. It's too old to migrate

However, based upon my understanding of what's on-topic on those sites, I believe this question would be on-topic on them as well.

(Also it doesn't specify either an XCode version or MacOS version)

Given that folks succeeded in answering the question anyway, and nobody has commented to complain that the answers don't work for them, presumably nothing relevant has changed across versions. In any case, it's probably safe to guess that the asker was using the latest version at the time that he asked.

If anything does change in a later release that invalidates existing answers, somebody can give an answer specific to the new version, and edit the previous answers to indicate what versions they apply to. This kind of approach is frequently more reader-friendly than indicating exact versions in questions.

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  • We know what XCode is. Is it correct then that questions about reducing the size of an XCode install are on-topic (since it's an IDE), but questions about reducing the size of a Windows/Linux OS installation off-topic (just an OS)? And here are some borderline questions on IDEs Speed up VisualStudio 2010 and Resharper 6.1: Is it worth to use RamDisk?. Some clearer guidance would be useful. – smci May 10 '18 at 23:56
  • Thanks for mentioning Questions older >60 days are too old to migrate, I wasn't aware of that. – smci May 10 '18 at 23:58
  • "Is it correct then that questions about reducing the size of an XCode install are on-topic (since it's an IDE), but questions about reducing the size of a Windows/Linux OS installation off-topic (just an OS)?" - that's my interpretation of the rules, yes. – Mark Amery May 10 '18 at 23:59
  • Can you answer what I asked: how borderline offtopic would a question on XCode have to be to be offtopic? (Give us an example of one that would be offtopic, IYO?) – smci May 11 '18 at 0:12
  • As to "it doesn't specify either an XCode version or MacOS version", this is because the answers discuss specific directory sizes under /Library, ~/Library, /Applications, which Apple has been changing around in recent releases. Just because an answer solved an issue back in 2015, it may not even be correct or relevant today. Not having version numbers makes it harder to determine if this is even still an issue. – smci May 11 '18 at 0:13
  • 2
    @smci "(Give us an example of one that would be offtopic, IYO?)" - not sure if it's what you're looking for, but here's a clearly "too broad" one: stackoverflow.com/q/1402174/1709587. But if a question is specific and objective and not a resource recommendation question or some other class of verboten question explicitly covered by the close reasons, then being about Xcode generally makes a question innately on-topic, I think, in the same way as being about, say, Swift. – Mark Amery May 11 '18 at 0:20
  • Agree with most of what you wrote but this part is simply wrong for things which change as frequently as Xcode and MacOS, which break every couple of releases: *"If [that's not an if, but a when] anything does change in a later release that invalidates existing answers, somebody can give an answer specific to the new version, and edit the previous answers to indicate what versions they apply to [you must be joking! this is less scalable, the more versions and answers there are]. This kind of approach is frequently more reader-friendly than indicating exact versions in questions [no it's not]" – smci May 20 '18 at 9:30
  • Just stop and think about it: that's perfectly for fine for something which is very reliable and rarely changes (and thus also has few questions). But for things like MacOS and Xcode which break every couple of releases, that's like O(N^2) or O(N^3) maintenance overhead. In any case almost noone on SO feels obligated or incentivized to constantly maintain other people's answers. And anyway, it seriously isn't hard to simply state the version number: "Xcode 7.0" or "9.3" or whatever. I think you're quite aware that suggestion is a non-starter. – smci May 20 '18 at 9:35
  • @smci I'm not sure where you're getting the quadratic (let alone cubic!) maintenance overhead from. It's not like every solution has to be tested against every version ever released; answers generally have a minimum version from which they work and a maximum version that they work up to. If we do things your way, are users supposed to re-ask the same question once per version release, whether or not the answer has changed? How is that any more "scalable" than what I propose? – Mark Amery May 20 '18 at 11:22
  • The breakage is proportional to how often they break things, i.e. the rate of releases times the propensity of each release to break stuff. The rate of questions is proportional to the breakage rate. The rate of answers is proportional to the rate of questions times the volume of change and obscurity of the breakage, i.e. quadratic or worse. The maintenance overhead of maintaining all the old questions is thus worse than quadratic. And as we all know, essentially noone maintains old questions. Whereas simply asking people to state version numbers in questions is easy and scaleable. – smci May 21 '18 at 4:30

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