17

There is a class of questions that admittedly are requests to "find" a "book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource", but which, rather than being recommendation questions, are instead identification questions, with a single correct answer.

Questions in this class typically take a structure like:

  • I am using tool X; where is its official source code repo so I can read the code and contribute patches? (Examples: 1, 2, 3.)
  • I am attempting to understand how notable piece of software X was written. What language/tool/library does it use to do Y? (Examples: 1, 2, 3.)
  • Where are the docs for X? (Examples: 1, 2, 3.)
  • Here is some distinctive output. What tool produced it? (Examples: 1, 2, 3.)

(At the time of asking, four out of twelve of these are closed.)

Does it really make sense to close these? Consider the text of the close reason:

"Questions asking us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it."

Given the first "or", the bolded condition in the close reason is technically met; these are all requests to find an off-site resource. But the rationale for banning such questions simply doesn't apply to them. If it's a question about identifying or locating a particular off-site resource, rather than asking us to recommend one, then the question in no way invites opinionated answers or spam.

I don't think we should close these kinds of questions - at least, not with this close reason. I think many of them are practical questions with value to other programmers, and that it's silly to close them with a close reason whose rationale for existing, explicitly given in the close banner, does not actually apply to them.

Do you agree?

  • 1
    Two issues come immediately to mind. First being when the project maintainer redoes the website and breaks all of the links. The second being how unlikely we are to update links to up-to-date versions. – Joe C May 10 '18 at 23:15
  • @JoeC FWIW, I find that the community is remarkably good at keeping links up to date, especially on popular posts. I will concede that answers to questions that are specifically asking for a link to something are more likely to become completely obsolete over time than the average answer is. – Mark Amery May 10 '18 at 23:32
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    Not something SO ever tried to do. While it might be "best" or "only" today, it certainly isn't guaranteed to be a year from now. The remarkable decline and fall of [jquery] is a pretty notable example, nobody thinks the jokes about it are funny anymore. Flares up at meta repeatedly. – Hans Passant May 11 '18 at 0:24
  • 1
    @HansPassant With "best" you're getting firmly into recommendation territory, which isn't what I'm talking about. The kinds of question I give above are ones where the nature of the question more-or-less guarantees that there is only a single correct answer. In many cases that's an answer that might change over time, but that's equally true of a question like "Is gcc clever enough to optimise away [some complicated thing]?" and we don't close those. Also, while these questions have always been officially off-topic per a literal reading of the rules, many are open and highly-upvoted. – Mark Amery May 11 '18 at 0:33
16

Even if there's only one correct answer, many of these kinds of questions will produce link-only answers. Answers on Stack Overflow are supposed to be inherently useful, not pointers to useful data.

If the only possible answer is just a pointer, then it's not a valid question for Stack Overflow.

As for questions of the form "What language/tool/library does it use to do Y?", I'm not sure why we need to host such information on SO. Especially since such information can change. I don't feel that these kinds of questions produce useful information. And for questions about things that aren't open source, you're dipping into territory where it is likely that only the actual developers can answer such questions.

  • 6
    "If the only possible answer is just a pointer, then it's not a valid question for Stack Overflow." - the thing is, many practical problems, like wanting to contribute a bugfix to a tool but not knowing where it's maintained, specifically require "just a pointer". The questions asking for that pointer are objectively answerable and useful to a broad audience. Why shouldn't we thus choose to permit them? What harm do they do, by existing, that is sufficient to justify banning them? This answer feels circular to me - aren't you justifying the rules by simply stating that they are the rules? – Mark Amery May 10 '18 at 23:23
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    @MarkAmery: What harm do pointers do? You must not program in a language that uses them ;) Pointers may point to invalid objects, objects which have already been deleted or had their memory deallocated. Or re-allocated. Or shuffled around. Pointers are not safe. The analogy works just as well for links. We don't like link-only answers of any form. We want SO to build a knowledge-base, not be a link-farm. – Nicol Bolas May 10 '18 at 23:38
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    I program in many languages that have pointers, and I have no idea why you're pulling that card. Everything is temporal. Without a version or a date, and with time passing all answers approach invalidity. – Evan Carroll May 10 '18 at 23:48
  • 1
    @NicolBolas While I take your point and appreciate your metaphor, it doesn't persuade me. Many questions become obsolete over time. I've asked questions about Facebook APIs that today don't exist; any question about a web API is vulnerable to such obsolescence. So too is a question about coding for a cloud platform, like writing Apex in Salesforce. Even questions about plain old libraries become mostly obsolete as breaking changes happen; the old versions may not literally vanish from the universe, but they become increasingly irrelevant over time as their usage drops. – Mark Amery May 10 '18 at 23:56
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    @MarkAmery: But those questions remain correct... for the versions of the APIs or whatever that they were written against. Maybe that's not useful in cases where you cannot control the version of your APIs, but for cases where you can, those old answers still have value. Once a link is dead, it has precisely zero value. Stack Overflow is not a link farm, and we should not aspire to become one. That is not a door we want to open even a crack. – Nicol Bolas May 10 '18 at 23:59
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    @NicolBolas "But those questions remain correct... for the versions of the APIs or whatever that they were written against" - I might as well argue that a broken link to a docs page remains correct for the version of docs site that it was written against. It's a pretty meaningless kind of correctness, in both cases; if the API a question is about is proprietary and closed-source and its owner removes it from the internet, then questions about it (or answers relying upon it) become every bit as useless as an answer telling you where the docs used to be hosted in 2014. – Mark Amery May 11 '18 at 0:03
-14

If we can't ask for and provide authoritative verifiable links to resources on third-party servers, then functioning as a support service is way out of left field and off-topic.


There are a lot questions under and (not sure why they're separate) and pertaining to third party APIs that are substantially more problematic for StackOverflow because they lack the ability to be independently verified at any point in time.

"Questions asking us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it."

While this close-reason is specific to finding an off-site resource, I can't see why the spirit isn't more applicable to . Publishing involves not just code but policy, and implementation. Take for instance this question,

Debug symbols may be a problem with the App Store accepting your bundle, but how are we to know that won't change tomorrow? In fact, it's a complex problem and we can't verify that the solution even works now without your bundle and total access to Apple's server controlling for your credentials and network access. It has all the problems of finding an authoritative link, except it's not authoritative nor verifiable (there may be confounding factors).

So essentially we accept questions that have the problem of being "pointers" are further encumbered being subject to non-technical bureaucracy and because you're transmitting credentials and a bundle we can never verify the conclusion -- we're just shooting in the dark.

You could probably burninant the entire and the respective 4,628 questions. Just look at the top posts in it,

If we can't ask for and provide authoritative verifiable links to resources on third-party servers, then functioning as a support service is way out of left field and off-topic.

  • 7
    "then functioning as a support service is way out of left field and off-topic" ... yes. Stack Overflow is not meant to be a support service. Also, the point is that we don't want link-only answers. We don't mind links as supplementary information, but answers should provide actionable information even if all the links were removed. – Nicol Bolas May 11 '18 at 3:27
  • You're still making the conversation about the link, but that's not the conversation. "We don't mind answers with API information as supplementary information, but answers should provide actionable information even if all the APIs are removed." Ok.. then we agree that they need to go? If you can't ask for the end point, why should the unspecified response to a proprietary and unversioned third party service matter? – Evan Carroll May 11 '18 at 5:18
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    "We don't mind answers with API information as supplementary information, but answers should provide actionable information even if all the APIs are removed." That doesn't even begin to make sense. If there are no APIs... the question/answer is rendered moot. Whereas if the links disappear, the question/answer may or may not be relevant. Let's not worry about the circumstances where questions/answers are rendered obsolete, and instead work on creating good answers that are useful without outside help. – Nicol Bolas May 11 '18 at 17:31
  • That's just special pleading though. If I want information on docs, and someone tells me to request foobar.com for /docfind and send {name:"index"} how is that different than saying where are the docs and providing foobar.com/docfind?name=index as an answer. You're dancing around semantics when the effects are the same. – Evan Carroll May 11 '18 at 17:35
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    If you want "information on docs"... this isn't the place for it. I don't know what the rest of your post means. Links and actual, actionable textual information are not the same thing. That's not "semantics"; that's reality. – Nicol Bolas May 11 '18 at 17:36

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