21

I am really sorry, but I don't give my credit card data to anybody.

The reason doesn't matter. The disadvantages I incur don't matter. How much I trust them doesn't matter.

Not even PayPal has my credit card data.

The only place I am willing to give my credit card data is the site of my own bank or credit card company.

I would like to pay Stack Exchange; I trust it, but I will not share my credit card number with the site under any circumstances.

Please enable a way to pay for Teams via PayPal.

  • 17
    Perhaps broaden this a bit? There are other options besides just Paypal, and I've heard a few companies that refuse to use Paypal because they've been screwed in the past. So, for example, "Please allow non-credit card payment options for Teams" – Kendra May 3 '18 at 16:24
  • 5
    @peterh we anticipate offering an invoicing option in the future. – Chance Heath May 3 '18 at 16:26
  • 19
    Peterh, I'd suggest rewording the feature request a bit. I suspect the downvotes are because of the negativity towards CC payments. This distracts from the point of the feature request: Different payment options. – Cerbrus May 3 '18 at 16:39
  • 4
    @peterh A company wanting customers just needs to have different options, not necessarily Paypal. They can be as choosy as they want, in the interest of protecting their business. I've seen plenty of successful companies reject Paypal. Granted, they are smaller, but they were small before they moved off Paypal. All I'm saying is, it doesn't necessarily have to be Paypal to make this better. – Kendra May 3 '18 at 16:41
  • 1
    @Cerbrus The important thing is, the reason is that I simply don't share my CC card number on the Internet. Not even for people/companies I trust - even if I can trust their goodwill, I can't trust the security of all of them, until the eternity. Furthermore, I read though 100 page long "Terms of Service" and analyze them with a lawyer knowing well the U.S. law. Thus, the only way for me to make me paying on the Internet, if it is a prepaid service, I pay before I would use the service, and if I don't pay in any circumstances, then the contract will be revoked automatically, – peterh May 3 '18 at 16:46
  • 19
    @peterh: But that's not really relevant to this feature request, is it? "Please add more options to pay, instead of CC. I don't want to use a CC." is a very good reason already. Especially considering the fact it's not that "normal" to have a credit card, everywhere. – Cerbrus May 3 '18 at 16:49
  • 1
    @user1114 First, as a company, you need to have such terms of services and pricing, what doesn't forbid "abuse" (in the sense of over-using the service), but makes it better paying. For example, if a user creates 20million questions by you with a script, I think it is reasonable to allow it - but only after they paid for it. In more serious cases, you can terminate the contract with them. Or what abuse are you talking about? – peterh May 3 '18 at 17:19
  • 17
    You don't trust Paypal with your CC but you trust it with your bank account? – 0xFF May 4 '18 at 13:31
  • 5
    @MartinBonner AFAIK, pretty much the same would happen with a credit card no? In my experience CC transactions are very easy to reverse. – 0xFF May 4 '18 at 14:15
  • 5
    @0xFF Even easier, in fact, and they come with quite a bit of fraud protection on the consumer's side which does not exist for checking/savings accounts. If someone defrauds your CC, you will not be on the hook for much or any of the money. If someone defrauds your savings or checking account... sorry, that money is gone. – TylerH May 4 '18 at 14:21
  • 1
    @peterh Most companies don't accept PayPal as a form of payment for B2B transactions. I don't think this makes them "choosy", it's just not necessary when there are easier, safer, and more ubiquitous methods of payments available. – TylerH May 4 '18 at 14:24
  • 3
    @peterh Your bank is just another company like a credit card company is. They are both required to adhere to the exact same privacy and security standards with regard to your credit card information. – TylerH May 4 '18 at 23:56
  • 3
    @peterh That's not true; you pay the bank all the money you have stored with them. They then use that money to make loans and investments. That's how they make money and stay in business. They are able to always give you "your" money when you ask for it in person because regulations typically require that they keep X dollars in cash on hand. But they don't take your cash and then put it in a box and never touch it until you come asking for it... that's not how banking works. Banking is a big business. – TylerH May 5 '18 at 14:33
  • 4
    @peterh Look, any introductory course in banking will show you that I'm not making this up. I'm sorry you don't believe me. Just know that your money may be your money legally, but that doesn't mean you'll always get it. That's what made the stock market crash of 1929 in the United States so bad. Everyone went to withdraw "their money" from the banks and the banks didn't have it because (surprise) that's not how banking works. Even today US banks are only required to have enough cash to dispense up to a certain amount of your money when you ask for it. – TylerH May 5 '18 at 14:40
  • 2
    Given that capability through the bank, I don't see why you would want to involve Paypal, who have somewhat of a reputation for seizing funds that people trusted them with. The recipient can't start any new transactions through the system -- if they could convince a court that you owed money and the court ordered garnishment, they could perhaps take that court order to the bank and save some time finding your account using the transaction number from one of the transactions you authorized -- having an intermediary wouldn't prevent that process, and probably not slow it down very much. – Ben Voigt May 6 '18 at 2:05

You must log in to answer this question.

Browse other questions tagged .