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I was going back over old answers of mine and found this question asking "What the scope operator ( :: ) do in the class name".

The question has a score of -2 with 2 upvotes and 4 downvotes, but what is wrong with the question? It is simple, short, and not something someone new to C++ could easily find out without reading through an entire tutorial on classes.

I searched for existing questions [ 1, 2 ] but couldn't find any that directly answer what OP is asking.

It would seem to me that even simple questions should be welcome on Stack Overflow as long as they are not duplicates.

Why did so many feel this question was not valuable?

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    'reading through an entire tutorial on classes' - is that not to be expected of someone who wishes to use an OO language? – Martin James May 2 '18 at 17:25
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    Although I cannot speak for the users who down-voted the question you linked to, my guess is that they did so because of the poor research. – Christian Dean May 2 '18 at 17:25
  • could even be revenge votes. no way to tell really, and not much to do about it. – Kevin B May 2 '18 at 17:27
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    [2] seems pretty close to me. (Not that that alone would explain all 4 of the downvotes, since no one bothered to link to it let alone vote to close the question as a duplicate.) – BoltClock May 2 '18 at 17:32
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    That question is tagged [c++] and yet it doesn't have a -20 score. What's happening? – Will May 2 '18 at 18:19
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    @Will signed integer underflow - UB. – Martin James May 2 '18 at 20:18
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Why did so many feel this question was not valuable?

Although I cannot speak for the users who down-voted the question you linked to, my guess is that they did so because of the lack of research.

You said in your question: "[The question] is simple, short, and not something someone new to C++ could easily find out without reading through an entire tutorial on classes.". This is exactly the point. We expect users to do a certain amount of research before asking a question here. The answer to the question you linked to could have likely been found by doing a bit of research.

In addition to that, as @BoltClock pointed out in the comments, the question also seems to be a duplicate. Of course, as @BoltClock also pointed out in the comments, it seems odd that no one would vote to close the question as a duplicate, so this may not have been the primary cause.

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    I guess my misunderstanding was with "even simple questions should be welcome on Stack Overflow as long as they are not duplicates". That assumption looks to be incorrect. – Increasingly Idiotic May 2 '18 at 17:49
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    @IncreasinglyIdiotic "Welcome" and "High Quality" are two different things. You can ask as simple a question as you want, so long as it isn't closeworthy and otherwise fits the site rules. Just don't expect it to be considered high-quality unless it's incredibly exceptional. – Kendra May 2 '18 at 17:57
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    @IncreasinglyIdiotic You seem to be conflating the terms "Simple" and "Low Quality". Stack Overflow does welcome simple questions. What Stack Overflow doesn't welcome is low quality questions. Although it may often be true that a question is simple and low-quality, that's not always the case. The quality of a question is independent of its complexity. Also, as Kendra said above, just because a question is on-topic, doesn't mean it will be up-voted. Sometimes a question can follow all the rules and still fall into obscurity because it's just not interesting. – Christian Dean May 2 '18 at 18:02
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    @Kendra I think its a stretch to say this question was "Welcome" on SO. It may not be worthy of deletion but a new user asking 2 questions as "welcome" as this one would get them a question asking ban. I do believe the consensus is that these questions should not be asked on SO i.e. not welcome – Increasingly Idiotic May 2 '18 at 18:59
  • Note that "research" only matters if the answer to the question exists elsewhere on Stack Overflow. In which case closing as a duplicate is the appropriate course of action. It makes no sense to downvote a question because the answer could be found somewhere else on the internet. Most of the content on Stack Overflow could probably be found in one form or another somewhere on the internet. – user4639281 May 25 '18 at 22:57
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    You're attacking a strawman, @TinyGiant. I never claimed it made sense to downvote a question because "the answer could be found somewhere else on the internet". That's not what I'm arguing. Notice how in my answer I used phrases such as "likely been" and "a bit". What I'm arguing is that if the answer to a question can be fairly easily found, regardless of whether the answer is on Stack Overflow or some other site, then one should downvote it. What about a question asking about some aspect of a language that could easily be answered by a quick search in said language's . . . – Christian Dean May 26 '18 at 0:37
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    . . . documentation? Would you not downvote such as question for a lack of research? Just because the answer to a question doesn't exist on Stack Overflow, doesn't mean it's not easily discovered. I'm really not sure why you would define research so narrowly as to only include posts on Stack Overflow. I expect users to search on the internet in general, for an answer, not just Stack Overflow. – Christian Dean May 26 '18 at 0:37
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    @IncreasinglyIdiotic Change "welcome" to "allowed". – user202729 May 26 '18 at 3:22
  • If it's an on-topic reasonably scoped non-duplicate question then it doesn't matter if it can be easily found in the documentation or not. It matters if it is a duplicate on Stack Overflow or not. – user4639281 May 26 '18 at 5:04
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    I have to say I completely disagree @TinyGiant. One frankly, should not care whether the question is well put together or not. If it has no research, it should be downvoted. Whether the question is on-topic and/or reasonble scope has no bearing here. This seems to be the general norm here on Stack Overflow (e.g. meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/261592/…), and as I said above, it seems your new definition of 'research' is quite ad hoc. – Christian Dean May 26 '18 at 6:25

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