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This question already has an answer here:

I teach IT and Computing to (predominantly) 16-18 year olds, which includes some JavaScript and Python programming. Part of my job is preparing these learners for work in the IT industry.

While I encourage them to use Stack Overflow as a resource, I'd like to go one step further and set up an account for my class (I'd make clear in the bio that that's what it was). I could selectively give out the password for students to ask questions and learn to use Stack Overflow and we could even attempt some answers as a group; the goal here being to educate them on how to use this site.

Are there any problems with me doing so with respect to Terms and Conditions and similar? And are there any other problems with doing so? Clearly I already have an SO account (and hopefully obviously I wouldn't be upvoting my answers with this account or vice versa) but are there any other problems with this sort of pseudo-duplicate account?

marked as duplicate by Alexei Levenkov discussion Apr 26 '18 at 15:11

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    In principle, no: cf. Can multiple people operate one account?, Posting questions by bots and Selling Stack Overflow accounts (Meta.SE). It is not completely inconceivable that Stack Overflow (the company) might grant you an exemption if you ask nicely. I wonder, though, what would be the gains in doing so vs. letting your students have their own accounts they can keep after the course ends. – duplode Apr 26 '18 at 4:29
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    @duplode Well, I would (and do) encourage some of the higher ability students to do that. But there's an element of shielding SO here - if I encourage students to set up their own account and use SO as a resource then we'll quickly be flooded with duplicate low quality answers. Doing it as a class account where I control the password allows the benefit of teaching them how to use the site while preventing some of the (frankly inevitable) abuse that would come with just pointing them to it and turning them loose. It's about scaffolding their interaction with the site. – MrB Apr 26 '18 at 4:33
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    That's actually quite reasonable. It would be good to have an answer from staff here. – duplode Apr 26 '18 at 4:39
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    Tangential note: You might find the guidelines for class projects at Wikibooks an interesting read, even though they of course aren't directly applicable here. – duplode Apr 26 '18 at 4:58
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    Let say one of your student ask bad question.... So account will be disabled... And let say even more worst case happen.... How do you track which student use SO in that time – I am the Most Stupid Person Apr 26 '18 at 5:47
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    As I mention, I'd be controlling the password. While I haven't got the entire classroom workflow clear in my head yet, I'd imagine it would be something like "Show me the quesiton in notepad++" "Yeah, that looks good lets get it posted"/"Nope, you've not asked that right. You need to blah blah blah" – MrB Apr 26 '18 at 5:50
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    @MrB Understood... Why you think that having one account for all student is benifitical than having separate accounts for alll????. I mean after they having separate account also you can apply ""Show me the quesiton in notepad++" "Yeah, that looks good lets get it posted"/"Nope, you've not asked that right. " part...... – I am the Most Stupid Person Apr 26 '18 at 5:53
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    @MrB It seems to me that students having their own accounts and you still apply the benefit of teaching them how to use the site would be a good solution here? That way - your students can build up their own profiles and can continue to use their account afterwards and you don't risk a bad apple ruining it for everyone? – Jon Clements Apr 26 '18 at 6:25
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    Having the common (class) account does not prevent them from using their own account to post low-quality questions. That's the problem. If each of them have their own account and you can still control them then there would be no problem. – user202729 Apr 26 '18 at 7:22
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    (as a side note, I find the existing questions and the documentation 100% suffice to answer everything. The chance that there are anything to ask is very low, especially if they're homework) – user202729 Apr 26 '18 at 7:24
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    @user202729 you hit the nail on the head. Stack Overflow is far from a tutoring service, the entire incentive to want to go these lengths is based on exactly the greater truth: they're going to ask unwanted questions and their experience will be very poor for it. The better course of action is to teach these kids/juniors/novices how to search rather than how to ask. – Gimby Apr 26 '18 at 9:20
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    If you give them a password to a shared account there is a chance they will post nonsense just to goof around because they are unaccountable for their actions. What you could do, instead, is to ask everyone on the class to open an account and to give you the link to the user page. Then implement the process you mentioned about when they have a question, search before ask, format the question etc. That way, they won't post nonsense just to goof off, they build a profile and you actually can check their profiles to see how they are doing and give them pointers. – Dzyann Apr 26 '18 at 14:54
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    So far I don't see how this is different from meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/356923/… as suggested by @duplode. As an option to reopen you can edit post into something like "Benefits/drawbacks of sharing SO account for education purposes (hypothetical as SO TOS prohibits it now)". – Alexei Levenkov Apr 26 '18 at 15:14
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    Another option is to check out cseducators.stackexchange.com which probably has some similar topics already, and probably would be good place to ask on guidance how to teach of using SO. – Alexei Levenkov Apr 26 '18 at 15:20
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    Wow, that conversation took off. In answer to the various people who have asked "why not just give them/get them to set up an account each" , its to do with a concept called scaffolding. The key point is that (with some students, not all) saying "here's a site where you can ask questions" will be overwhelming and they'll never use it and with others (again, not all) will ask every single question that comes in to their mind - not out of malice, out of lack of experience. Students need to be taught to use resources and to have a structured way of learning. Or at least some do, we...cont – MrB Apr 26 '18 at 16:02