3

I ran into this question: Are newlines stored internally as \n or a literal newline character?

This seemed like a perfectly fine question, and I saw it was downvoted twice.

It was also marked as a duplicate of: Difference between __str__ and __repr__?

I don't see how these questions are duplicates. Sure, the explanation of the OP's confusion in the first question will have to do with the answers provided in the second, but the primary question seems unique ("how are newlines stored?").

I typically downvote questions that are obvious duplicates of other Stack Overflow questions. So I think that by marking this (to my estimation, reasonable) question as a duplicate, it's tempting for people to think that it really is a duplicate and therefore it should be downvoted.

Specific questions:

  • Does the community think that these questions are truly duplicates?

  • Is there a way of distinguishing true duplicate questions verses separate unique questions that just have a similar core issue? (In my opinion, the answer should link to the similar question, but marking it as a dupe seems odd when the main question clearly isn't a dupe.)

  • Am I employing bad judgement by downvoting obvious true duplicates (as in, the question is literally the same as another question)? I thought this would encourage users to search first, but I also don't like discouraging questions from being asked, and if we're going to mark-as-duplicate questions that aren't really duplicates, but have a similar underlying explanation, then maybe I need to re-think whether duplicates are deserving of a downvote.

  • Related: meta.stackoverflow.com/q/361421/4909087 ... ;) – cs95 Apr 25 '18 at 18:58
  • I find it easier to just vote based on clarity and usefulness to be honest, when you put research effort into the equation things just become difficult with too many variables. Push comes to shove, a lack of research tends to result in unclear or pointless questions anyway. – Gimby Apr 26 '18 at 12:11
  • Don't downvote duplicates! They're very useful. People think about problems in different ways, and having the same question worded differently may help future searchers. – Cássio Renan Apr 27 '18 at 22:03
10

Does the community think that these questions are truly duplicates?

Yes, technically these are duplicates. It's not obvious at first glance, but that's why it's a good idea to link them together. So people can learn the underlying causes of their problems, instead of having us repeat the same answers over and over again.

Is there a way of distinguishing true duplicate questions verses separate unique questions that just have a similar core issue?

Not a systematic way (like voting to close as duplicate), but people often just link to related questions in comments if they think two questions are related but not duplicates.

Am I employing bad judgement by downvoting obvious true duplicates (as in, the question is literally the same as another question)?

No, I don't think so. People showing no research effort is one of the main reasons to downvote. If they're asking exactly the same question that they would have found via Google, it's ok in my opinion to use your downvotes.

I thought this would encourage users to search first, but I also don't like discouraging questions from being asked, and if we're going to mark-as-duplicate questions that aren't really duplicates, but have a similar underlying explanation, then maybe I need to re-think whether duplicates are deserving of a downvote.

Not all duplicates deserve downvotes! Some duplication is expected, and can even serve a useful purpose in helping people find the original question and answers. So you're right to hesitate to downvote a question like this, but it's also ok to vote to close it as a duplicate. Trust that most people will use the same judgement that you are when deciding whether or not to downvote.

  • Not sure about the downvote on this answer? It's a perfectly valid answer to me... then again I shouldn't go dissecting votes on meta... – cs95 Apr 25 '18 at 19:15
  • 3
    @cᴏʟᴅsᴘᴇᴇᴅ Any time I say "it's ok to downvote" on Meta, I expect at least one irony downvote. ;) – Bill the Lizard Apr 25 '18 at 19:16
  • 5
    I would go one step further. Some duplicates deserve upvotes. Yes, I said it. If there is a drastically different wording of a problem with some obscure connection to a separate answered problem that cannot reasonably be traced, then a well-researched question should still deserve an upvote. – jpp Apr 25 '18 at 23:31
8

Well, since I'm the user who hammered the question, let me explain myself.

I was not the user who cast the initial close vote, but I agreed with the action to close, and here's why. The current target, albeit a little broad, answers the question the OP should be asking. The root of the question is essentially the difference between the __repr__ and __str__, which, judging by the nature of the question, the OP is not aware of. In closing as duplicate, I'm pretty much addressing OP's question in a broader sense.

If someone asked you what "1 + 1" was, would you say "the answer is 2, go figure it out", or would you explain how basic arithmetic works instead?

Anyway, since you seem dissatisfied with the closure, I found a more specific link and have already edited the duplicate list: Python newline display in console and also Print "\n" or newline characters as part of the output on terminal

If you're still not convinced, feel free to search around a bit more, I'll be happy to add whatever you find to the list of duplicates (as long as it's valid).

  • 4
    As the OP I found the actual answer on the question to be the most helpful. The duplicate is only helpful once you have the added information that "interpreters use repr() when printing values." But ironically while I wouldn't have been satisfied with just the close votes, I was indeed satisfied with the combination of the answer and the close vote. So everybody working together led to the best possible outcome :) – Stephen Apr 25 '18 at 19:05
  • Coldspeed, I think I'm just not using the same definition of duplicate that you are, and from the community vote, it appears that I may need to change my definition :). I absolutely agree that part of the answer should explain why he was seeing the different forms of the data in his interpreter, but the core of the question just doesn't appear to be a duplicate, since asking how Python stores newlines is different than asking what the difference is between __repr__ and __str__, and both are different from asking how newlines appear in the console, even though they are all very related. – Greg Schmit Apr 25 '18 at 19:09
  • 2
    It's tough. I only condone this closure because there was a good answer beforehand. The other way round, I would be disappointed, because the chances are OP wouldn't be able to make the connection. If the order matters, there's an argument that it's not a dup. – jpp Apr 25 '18 at 19:14
  • 1
    @jpp I agree that the answer on the closed question makes it a lot easier to see the connection. It is spelled out in an answer on the linked (original) post, but you have to scroll all the way down to Mangu's answer to see it. – Bill the Lizard Apr 25 '18 at 19:22
  • 1
    FWIW I also thought there was some ambiguity as to whether this was a true dupe. This is why I merely suggested the link as a related post rather than voting to close. – pault Apr 25 '18 at 19:37
  • 1
    @pault I was vacillating a bit myself there, otherwise I'd have cast the first vote. DyZ's vote was probably my tipping point. – cs95 Apr 25 '18 at 19:38

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .