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This question already has an answer here:

TL;DR - a request to avoid pedantic door-slamming on documentation- related questions, specific in this case: re. TensorFlow.

More of a comment than a question. I try not to use Stack Overflow since it has changed into what it is now, but I felt I had to comment on the fellow who asked about how to get access to TensorFlow documentation - and the question was closed as being inappropriate. Query was "How can you download TensorFlow API documentation". Of all all the questions ever asked on Stack Overflow, that might be one of the most useful I have ever seen - yet it was shut down. Most annoying, and nothing I can do.

Look, the folks at TensorFlow have made it clear they are using SO for interaction with their user-community, so that is just how it is. I have been looking for any written-down technical or user-doc for TF, and all I ever get is referrals to youtube videos or tutorials that target folks trying to do image processing. The MNIST tutorial is interesting, but not what I am involved with, or focused on. It is astonishingly frustrating, but such is life, eh? It's "open source", and you take what you can get, such as it is.

But the OP's question about TF Documentation is a critical and important one. Heck, at least for me it was. I've done Google and DDG searches,and they often lead to SO posts. And SO posts are sometimes an excellent source of undocumented, critically important information. So, perhaps before we slam the door on a question, perhaps we might think about basic purpose first? Much of the internet has become a shill-shack full of hype, fraud and dis-info, but this question re. documentation was rather important.

I've been unable to find any proper written documentation on TensorFlow. It is very frustrating, so I clicked thru to this Stack Overflow query with some relief - only to find a user group had slammed the door on it.

So, my modest proposal: When an open-source collective has made the decision to rely on Stack Overflow as its primary bug-track and user-contact/support tool, perhaps we might be a little more tolerant of folks who - by necessity - are trying to use this vector to engage in some sort of communication.

marked as duplicate by gnat, HaveNoDisplayName, S.L. Barth, Blackwood, Toto Apr 16 '18 at 13:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    Stack Overflow is a question-and-answer site, not a bug-tracking service. If TensorFlow wants a support/bug-tracking system, they should invest in one themselves. – Joe C Apr 15 '18 at 22:01
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    Devil's advocate here: can someone explain why What are the correct version numbers for C#?, which could be deemed a documentation question, entirely acceptable? – jpp Apr 15 '18 at 22:37
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    Whether or not you agree with this viewpoint, I don't understand the downvotes. This question/proposal is a valid discussion of what's "appropriate" on SO. Where else are people supposed to go to discuss these things if not meta SO? Even if YOU personally don't agree with their question or proposal. – Alex Apr 15 '18 at 22:38
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    @Alex ...and the downvotes indicate disagreement with the OP's proposal - that's how meta works. I disagree even with the title: 'good questions'; no. 'closed too quickly':no. Note that there are no close votes - nobody is trying to prevent discussion. The OP is entitiled to his/her viewpoint, (even though it's totally wrong:). – Martin James Apr 15 '18 at 22:43
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    @jpp a good question - I would have voted to close it. If you ever find out, please let me know:) – Martin James Apr 15 '18 at 22:48
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    @Alex BTW, you know those almost-worthless imaginary internet points you get as rep on the main site? Well, meta votes are worth less than that. – Martin James Apr 15 '18 at 22:52
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    The reason why Stack is successful, and why product teams send users to it for support, is because it doesn't lower its standards for these types of reasons – Patrice Apr 15 '18 at 22:56
  • @Alex, I'm with you on this one. The problem is within minutes this question gets demoted from the front page as it gets heavily downvoted. It deserves a little more air-time. – jpp Apr 15 '18 at 23:37
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    @jpp: "It deserves a little more air-time." No, it doesn't. There is nothing redeemable or useful in this question. – Nicol Bolas Apr 15 '18 at 23:48
  • @NicolBolas, Well, I offered an alternative answer. Maybe you don't think it's valid, but others might. That's why air time is important. – jpp Apr 15 '18 at 23:54
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    More air time? It's been up for an hour, at a time when murricans have long finished work and it's the middle of the night in Europe. and gained -9 votes already. I don't think this question can take much more more air time. – Martin James Apr 15 '18 at 23:56
  • ...besides, it's currently top of the 'active' tab and second in the 'newest'. It does't seem to have been demoted much ATM. – Martin James Apr 16 '18 at 0:01
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    @jpp This question doesn't deserve more air-time, just due to the derogatory tone/terms it takes/uses towards some actions/people/groups. If you feel that it brings up issues which should be constructively discussed, then you should create a Meta post about those issues which lays them out in a manner which is conducive to discussing them, rather than largely being a rant (or at least having the tone of a rant). – Makyen Apr 16 '18 at 0:14
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    @gemesyscanada The question which you are concerned about was open for more than 9 months. It was only closed once it came to more general attention, due to someone posting a spam answer to the question (that such questions attract answers like that is one of the reasons that those questions are not permitted). I don't see how you can consider a clearly off-topic question being closed after 9+ months to be "closed to quickly". – Makyen Apr 16 '18 at 0:23
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    When an open-source collective has made the decision to rely on StackOverflow as its primary bug-track and user-contact/support tool Regardless of what any open-source collective decides, Stack Overflow is not a bug-tracking or customer-support tool. – EJoshuaS Apr 17 '18 at 4:12
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this question re. documentation was rather important.

You can always argue that a question is important. It's "rather important" to know how to get started programming C++. It's "rather important" to know how to write web browsers. It's "rather important" to know how to parse HTML with regexes. It's even "rather important" to know how to change the oil in your car.

Just because you deem a question "rather important" does not mean that it is appropriate for Stack Overflow.

When an open-source collective has made the decision to rely on StackOverflow as its primary bug-track and user-contact/support tool, perhaps we might be a little more tolerant of folks who - by necessity - are trying to use this vector to engage in some sort of communication.

No.

Stack Overflow cannot control whether some builders of some tool decide to try to use SO "as its primary bug-track and user-contact/support tool." We therefore cannot and should not treat questions about such tools any differently from questions on any other topic. We are not responsible for the TensorFlow community's problems, and we should not change our standards just for them.

We're happy to answer appropriate questions, of course. That's what SO is for. But if it's OK to ask how to download TensorFlow documentation, then it's OK to ask that about JavaScript documentation. Or any other tool.

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    Parsing html with Regex? H̘Ë͖́̉ ͠P̯͍̭O̚​N̐Y̡ H̸̡̪̯ͨ͊̽̅̾̎Ȩ̬̩̾͛ͪ̈́̀́͘ ̶̧̨̱̹̭̯ͧ̾ͬC̷̙̲̝͖ͭ̏ͥͮ͟Oͮ͏̮̪̝͍M̲̖͊̒ͪͩͬ̚̚͜Ȇ̴̟̟͙̞ͩ͌͝S̨̥̫͎̭ͯ̿̔̀ͅ ;) – EJoshuaS Apr 16 '18 at 4:10
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Look, the folks at TensorFlow have made it clear they are using SO for interaction with their user-community, so that is just how it is.

I have seen how the TensorFlow (TF) developers have tried to handle requests for support. In general, their guidelines on the Community menu seem fair:

Technical Questions

To ask or answer technical questions about TensorFlow, use Stack Overflow. For example, ask or search about a particular error message you encountered during installation.

Calling Stack Overflow a point of interaction to TensorFlow is fine, but such interactions should still conform to how this site works as usual: ask questions which are on-topic for the site, and receive answers, with no discussions inbetweeen.

Their issue tracker's template form on GitHub also explains why they send support to Stack Overflow.

Please go to Stack Overflow for help and support:

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/tensorflow

If you open a GitHub issue, here is our policy:

  • It must be a bug, a feature request, or a significant problem with documentation (for small docs fixes please send a PR instead).
  • The form below must be filled out.
  • It shouldn't be a TensorBoard issue. Those go here.

Here's why we have that policy: TensorFlow developers respond to issues. We want to focus on work that benefits the whole community, e.g., fixing bugs and adding features. Support only helps individuals. GitHub also notifies thousands of people when issues are filed. We want them to see you communicating an interesting problem, rather than being redirected to Stack Overflow.

We could argue that we also prefer questions which help more than an individual, but the taking point here is that the issue tracker should be designated to concerns which the TF developers would appreciate looking into. There are also some cases in which I would disagree with a redirection, albeit subjectively. In this issue for example, the user requested an example of a specific use of an experimental API. The respective question made afterwards on SO, in spite of having some upvotes, is not in a very good shape for our standards and is unlikely of being useful to future visitors. But then again, this is only my point of view on this particular occurrence.

However, that other question requesting for a downloadable documentation is not in a borderline and it was properly closed. Users of TensorFlow, as in any other technology, should seek to make good quality questions as well.

  • It must be a bug, a feature request, or a significant problem with documentation I just realized that TensorFlow has come up on Meta before. I didn't remember based on the name of the tag but the other question was about their documentation too. – BSMP Apr 16 '18 at 11:34
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The question is out of scope because SO already provides a solution separate to Q&A.

If you have sufficient reputation, edit the [tensorflow] tag wiki to include links to official documentation and other relevant resources.

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    That last part is what I've been missing from the other answers - it's OK to have official resources listed in a tag wiki. – S.L. Barth Apr 16 '18 at 13:26

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