-4

I recently came to realise that the See vote counts feature isn't available to everyone. (I had actually wondered why some SE sites had it and others didn't!)

In particular, new users, who have not reached the Established User level don't get to see the breakdown of up and down votes on their contributions.

New users need high quality feedback, and denying them this seems to be a mistake. The only possible motivation I can see for making it a privilege is so that people have something to win. Although SO makes significant use of gamification, the goal of the site is not to be a game. That's a means to an end, and one which is not served by this game feature.

A similar suggestion has been made for Meta, but not as far as I can see for the main site: Please let every member see vote counts on meta, regardless of reputation

Another question asks: What is the purpose of viewing vote counts? and the answers all seem to be things that would also help new users.

Another question asks: Why does it take 1000 reputation to view the vote count? yet it is asked and answered in terms of the technical costs. My question is about whether removing this feature from new users is the right thing to do, especially as new users are the very ones who need feedback to learn how to interact properly with SO. If performance problems really can't be mitigated technically, and use of the feature needs to be limited, then perhaps a different strategy would serve the overall good better.

  • I was always thinking that you always see that breakdown on your own posts? But I could be wrong. At least you know from your reputation history which votes happened. – BDL Apr 15 '18 at 9:56
  • 1
    Related discussion: Why does it take 1000 reputation to view the vote count? – honk Apr 15 '18 at 10:02
  • 1
    What is this: a game? Yes, very much yes. Gamification is a core design principle of the sites. – rene Apr 15 '18 at 10:08
  • 1
    The cost of the dbase query is surely the original reason. Caching data that is not often used and frequently changes is not very useful. The perhaps unintentional benefit is that it makes it less likely that new users get their underwear in a bundle about downvotes. They almost always do, it is a very non-facebooky feature of the site. – Hans Passant Apr 15 '18 at 10:09
  • 1
    You can already see the up and down votes on your own posts via your reputation tab: https://stackoverflow.com/users/<your id>?tab=reputation. This functionality only: 1. makes that slightly easier to consume, which isn't much of a problem for a new user with few posts; and 2. lets you see the split for others' posts, which isn't relevant to your argument. – jonrsharpe Apr 15 '18 at 10:12
  • The duplicate answers your question explicitly: Should everyone be able to see the vote counts? No, because of resources needed to display them natively, however a user actually can get around that with a script that is provided in the answer. No reason to add this feature since doing it would just add load to SO for something that can already be done. – Davy M Apr 15 '18 at 13:26
  • @DavyM (1) That question sufficiently explains the reasoning behind not making that available to everyone (in particular, it refers to answers from staff). However, this question shouldn't be closed as a duplicate: as a [feature-request], it amounts to proposing to reconsider that decision. (2) "No reason to add this feature since doing it would just add load to SO for something that can already be done." -- Making the feature more accessible is, in principle, a relevant motivation. While it "can already be done", it requires a SEDE query, something new users are unlikely to reach out for. – duplode Apr 15 '18 at 14:24
  • @duplode The OP may have tagged feature request, but the question is «Should "see vote counts" be available to everyone instead of as a privilege?» to which the duplicate answers no. – Davy M Apr 15 '18 at 15:49
  • @DavyM I feel that is too literal a reading of the title -- in fact, given the question body and the [feature-request] tag, I believe changing it to "Make 'see vote counts' available to everyone instead of as a privilege" would be a reasonable edit for someone other than the OP to make. There appears to be no consensus on the general matter of closing [feature-request]s as duplicates of [discussion]s; in any case, I lean towards the views of Tiny Giant and Braiam in this Meta Q&A. – duplode Apr 15 '18 at 15:58
  • The "duplicate" does not answer the question. My question is explicitly about desired functionality, not technical implementation. The other question is "Why is viewing the vote count that expensive?". Even given that it is expensive, using a badge might still be the wrong way to solve the problem. – Dominic Cronin Apr 15 '18 at 16:03
  • The real answer to this question is not technical. The answer is that the SE wants content from us. It uses rewards to reach this. The SE wants us to working hard for reputation. This is not the single "privilege" what could be given easily to everybody. This is why we can't see vote counts below 1000. | Note also, with a little knowledge of the data.stackexchange.com , we can see the vote counts, even without a registration, because it is public data. Although it is not so comfortable and it has some delay. – peterh Apr 15 '18 at 17:03
  • SE wants us working hard for reputation, but equally does not want to alienate new users before they get hooked on the system. Understanding up and down votes is one way to help them realise that it's fair, and worth their engagement. – Dominic Cronin Apr 15 '18 at 17:30
  • As for whether privileges are there to keep us busy, that's certainly not why I contribute. Privileges should really only be used to make sure that certain tasks can only be carried out by people who are sufficiently integrated into the community, and know its ways. Like the old custom that you don't poke someone's fire until you've known them seven years. Then you'll know how they like their fire to burn. – Dominic Cronin Apr 15 '18 at 17:37
-3

I think, the real answer to this question is not technical. The answer is that the SE wants content from us - to collect yet more users and visitors. It uses rewards to reach this. The SE wants us to working hard for reputation, thus you get the reward if you produce for them content. Useful content.

This is not the single "privilege" what could be given easily to everybody, but it is not.

The most funny part of this line is the highest meaningful privilege in the system: at 10000 reputation points, you get access the site's.... trash box. Yeah. You will be able to see deleted posts.

This is why we can't see vote counts below 1000. | Note also, with a little knowledge of the data.stackexchange.com, we can see the vote counts, even without a registration, because it is public data. Although it is not so comfortable and it has some delay

But it is only one side of the thing. The other side is, that using the SE,

  • you can learn quickly a lot, while you enjoy it
  • you can help good people a a lot, while you enjoy it
  • you get an above average protection from the flood of crap filling the whole Internet
  • ...and also an above average protection from the childish power misuses of old, high-rep site members.

Thus, the important thing is, that we shouldn't ever depend on the SE. We should only enjoy it. Most of the privileges are meaningless, and in my opinion, the last meaningful rep level which has some worth, is at 3k (with it, you can vote in close/reopen decisions).

The 1k rep "privilege" belongs to this line. It wouldn't be a very hard task to write a userscript which asks the vote counts from the SEDE even for <1k users. The problem is that it simply doesn't worth the effort. Most of the <1k programmers could implement it in some hours. But using these some hours to ask and answering questions is simply more enjoyable.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .