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As far as I understand it, Stack Overflow tries to advertise permanent, salaried positions only, with all that entails (pension, holiday entitlement, sick pay, travel allowance, car, etc). However, I'm looking to get back into contract software engineering work, and I believe that this is not an area that Stack Overflow presently caters to.

For the avoidance of doubt, I am using the UK understanding of "contract work". In the UK, we tend to go through an established IT recruitment firm, and ask a recruiter to find work of a specified duration (3 or 6 months is common), in a certain geographical location, matching a certain skillset, for a specified day rate. Contractors are regarded as self-employed, are usually registered as a Limited Company, and will usually have their own accountant.

Of course, recruiters are well remunerated, sometimes for very little work! However, of course, they work on a no-win-no-fee basis, which can make them an attractive proposition for hirers looking for engineers. As a guideline, the recruiters who operate an "open book" accounting system will charge between 15% and 30% of day rate, for the duration of the contract. Recruiters also tend to charge the client directly (and chase for monies if necessary) and will pay the engineer, usually on a weekly or two-weekly basis.

Now, I'm not a big fan of traditional IT recruiters, perhaps with some honourable exceptions, and I wonder if this is another area that would be ripe for disruption? I believe LinkedIn has made some impact here, but I imagine the brand value and trust that software engineers have with Stack Overflow is a lot better than LinkedIn, and Stack Overflow will understand the needs of this specialist market much better.

If anyone wishes to comment on whether this hiring approach is common in their country, please do - it'd be interesting to see what other countries have this sort of skills marketplace. And, of course, if you think it would not be good for Stack Overflow to get into this, do say why.

It'll be traditional recruiters for me this time around, but maybe next time? :-)

Update

Dean helpfully points out in the comments that in fact (UK) contract roles are accepted on the platform already. However, as he points out, they are few and far between, and this contrasts a fair bit from my view of the contracting market as being quite vibrant.

Thus, any answers about stimulating that market so contractors might be more likely to obtain roles via Stack Overflow, rather then Quite Evil Recruiters R Us, would be in scope.

I would expect that any change here would be in the expectation that the recruiter role is cut out entirely, such that an engineer and a client would draw up a pro-forma contract between themselves. However, being a recruiter is a lucrative business, so in countries where Stack Overflow actually has a legal presence, they might consider becoming the recruiting agent themselves. I'd rather that fee went to Stack Overflow than some traditional recruiters, and I expect SO could offer competitive fees to paying clients.

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    We do support contract roles, it's just not many employers tend to advertise such positions with us in the UK: stackoverflow.com/… – Dean Ward Apr 9 '18 at 10:48
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    Ah right, thanks @Dean - I'd not spotted those before. Are those roles placed by a traditional recruiter, or do they tend to be placed by the hiring company, and they write up a contract without a middle party? – halfer Apr 9 '18 at 10:52
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    We tend to deal directly with employers rather than contingency recruiters. Having worked in the UK and Irish contract markets myself I don't think this is an area we're particularly strong in. E.g. as you mention we don't have any support for hourly or daily rates. This is mostly because it's hard to normalise renumeration for job searchers in the UX and we haven't invested any effort in a good solution to that yet. There's certainly room for improvement; I'll bring it up with the team and see if they have any thoughts on the matter – Dean Ward Apr 9 '18 at 10:57
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    I expect it's the latter, since companies have to be named on Stack Overflow - and once one has a company name, one can just approach them directly! In relation to the number of contract positions available, I tend to think of the market as reasonably healthy, since there are more positions available for good engineers than there are good engineers. – halfer Apr 9 '18 at 10:57
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    Righto, thanks @Dean. I wonder also whether it might be a marketing issue too - perhaps the customers you would be most likely to attract here just go to traditional recruiters (and tolerate the high fees) because they don't know of alternatives? – halfer Apr 9 '18 at 10:59
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    FWIW I would love to cut out the agencies from the contracting market. It's disconcerting discovering how much of a cut they take that could be going directly into your own pocket :) – Dean Ward Apr 9 '18 at 11:02
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    Yes, indeed. Some recruiters who are not open book (and I presume that is most of them) will try to haggle down an engineer's price, not in order to pass on the saving to the client, but in order to take a bigger profit from someone else's labour. Some recruiters' business practices are unethical to say the least. – halfer Apr 9 '18 at 11:08
  • Is it something like freelancer? How it would be different from other freelancer portals? – Jeegar Patel Apr 9 '18 at 23:16
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    @JeegarPatel: I'm not familiar with that site, but contracting in the sense I mean it is not like freelancing. Freelancing is generally about short-term project work, and is not an area I think Stack Overflow should get into. It is often a source of low-quality clients and business disputes that SO would want to stay well away from. – halfer Apr 10 '18 at 0:31
  • Almost entirely pure speculation on my part, but I wonder if lots of UK companies use agencies to find contractors as a way to outsource finding suitable candidates. Agencies aren’t always particularly good at this, but from my understanding of Stack Overflow Jobs, it doesn’t seek to perform this function. – Paul D. Waite Apr 10 '18 at 8:50
  • Agreed @Paul. It's partly an initial filter, partly insuring against the high cost of self-advertising and self-searching, and partly hirers know that recruiters put the time in to keep their candidate database full. Even IT specialist recruiters don't have a sufficient understanding of technologies appearing on CVs, and that there are transferable skills between, say, Oracle and PostgreSQL. However, this situation will persist until new entrants shake the market up! – halfer Apr 10 '18 at 9:14
  • @halfer: indeed — or that Java and, say JavaScript are different languages. I don’t think Stack Overflow Jobs is going to be a new entrant in the initial filter space though. A hiring company would have to actually search Stack Overflow Jobs themselves, right? I think even that half a day’s worth of work would be a hard sell. (Not that that means they shouldn't look into it.) – Paul D. Waite Apr 10 '18 at 10:25
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    @Paul: London firms paying 500GBP a day for a specialist, if they were going through a recruiter charging 25%, would be paying an extra £30K+ a year on top, even without VAT (sales tax) factored in. Admittedly these figures are off the top of my head, and I don't know the London market, but nevertheless some firms might be persuaded to self-search (or indeed use Stack Overflow as the recruiting agent). – halfer Apr 10 '18 at 10:40
  • @halfer: true true. – Paul D. Waite Apr 10 '18 at 11:52
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    @DeanWard would you be so kind as to convert your comments into an answer? I think there's enough substance between the three of them, but it would be unwieldy for me to do it and have to say "According to Dean" ad nauseum – Jeutnarg Apr 11 '18 at 18:21
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(Posted Dean's comments as an answer).

We do support contract roles, it's just not many employers tend to advertise such positions with us in the UK:

https://stackoverflow.com/jobs?sort=i&l=United+Kingdom&d=100&u=Miles&j=contract

We tend to deal directly with employers rather than contingency recruiters. Having worked in the UK and Irish contract markets myself I don't think this is an area we're particularly strong in. E.g. as you mention we don't have any support for hourly or daily rates. This is mostly because it's hard to normalise remuneration for job searchers in the UX and we haven't invested any effort in a good solution to that yet. There's certainly room for improvement; I'll bring it up with the team and see if they have any thoughts on the matter.

FWIW I would love to cut out the agencies from the contracting market. It's disconcerting discovering how much of a cut they take that could be going directly into your own pocket :)

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