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In a majority of countries running elections results are private and in some even polling outside of polling stations is disallowed. Why should we allow it here then?

Main disadvantage: Seeing the count of registered votes for candidates is skewing our own personal opinions.

Main advantage: Vote counts is a 'primary' function of stack overflow, this makes the elections transparent to the whole community.

Gaining a critical amount of votes at the start of the election therefore makes it 'easier' for a candidate to prevail. (In my opinion I have no facts to back this, but it only seems like common sense.)

This question: In Stack Overflow elections, should the vote counts be hidden until after the election? from 2015 has gained unanimous votes pro private election counts.

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    I can assure you that my votes on the candidates have a different purpose then the 3 votes I cast in the actual election. And in that period you can't see which candidate got how many votes. So privacy is guaranteed there until the election is over. – rene Mar 23 '18 at 9:40
  • We don't have any power over why and what for people vote and shouldn't have. You are right about only primaries being public, however why should they be? – pijemcolu Mar 23 '18 at 9:56
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    primaries votes should be public so that we can verify that top 10 candidates were selected for election. However it possibly wouldn't hurt if these votes are published after primaries completion and stay hidden in the process. To me for example it would be more comfortable to vote in primaries without seeing the current counts – gnat Mar 23 '18 at 10:04
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    My (critical) comments I left on some nominations are no longer visible, I can no longer voice my concerns / support. I can only wave with my vote to get some final attention before the real thing happens. – rene Mar 23 '18 at 10:31
  • @rene Your comments are still visible if you open the nominations tab or are you talking about something else? – DavidG Mar 23 '18 at 12:09
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    Without bandwagons, it wouldn't be the internet. If we can't see how the other sheeps have voted, how would we know what to do? – Lundin Mar 23 '18 at 12:16
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    @Lundin funny, sure there is a bunch of sheeps out there, but I have fate that most of the voters have made their mind by verifying each candidat and reading their answers to questions – Antoine Pelletier Mar 23 '18 at 14:35
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    In a majority of countries running elections results are private and in some even polling outside of polling stations is disallowed. Stack Overflow is based in the United States and how each state votes in the primaries is made public ahead of the conventions for each of the main political parties. (Exit polls are also legal there.) – BSMP Mar 23 '18 at 14:41
  • Without the real-time voting info, we would be unable to target our requests for finanical incentives. I mean, it's pointless asking for a brown envelope full of cash from a candiate who is going to win anyway:( – Martin James Mar 23 '18 at 15:04
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    @DavidG - I believe rene is referring to the fact that comments are only visible if you took the effort to go back to the nominations tab in later stages. Most people don't make the effort, so visible vote counts might be a way of showing some of that community sentiment towards candidates. Related feature request. – Brad Larson Mar 23 '18 at 15:10
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    @BSMP As far as I know, that logic only applies to one election in the country -- the presidency -- which is unique in a number of ways. Primary elections for most others positions do just take place in a single day without intermediate results being revealed before the end of voting. But Stack Overflow isn't an American community, it's a global community, so the appeal to the wisdom of "a majority of countries" works either way. – Jeremy Banks Mar 24 '18 at 5:04
  • so the appeal to the wisdom of "a majority of countries" works either way @JeremyBanks It makes sense going forward but as far as explaining, "Why are vote counts for moderator elections public?" right now, it's likely due to it being an American company and probably most/all American employees at the time the system was set up. – BSMP Mar 24 '18 at 17:57
  • In many countries you can see voting predictions which can affect voters as well. – Victoria Mar 26 '18 at 8:02
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There is a slight mischaracterization of the way elections are being run here. Votes in the election are private.

Keep in mind, there are three phases here. A nomination, a primary, and an election. During the primary, the votes are made public, along with the ability to downvote a candidate, which to be frank I have always wondered about, but I digress. During the election, the votes are private.

Right now, being several days before the end of the election, no one knows who will be elected, or even who is currently winning, although historically the candidate winning the primary has always been elected.

As for seeing the vote count playing a major factor, I just don't see evidence of that. Rob gained 251 votes in only 11 minutes at the beginning, at a time when everyone's visible vote count was even. He also maintained that relative lead throughout the primary. Each user sees a randomized list of candidates. Each user can vote multiple times. Users who vote within the first several minutes of the election are probably rather well informed, or at least for the most part fairly aware (especially considering from my observation it took 7 minutes for the actual inbox notification to hit). I am inclined to believe those votes were merit based.

The public voting during the primary, while also convenient from a "just stick a upvote/downvote button on it" perspective, is very similar to actual electoral primaries. In electoral primaries, it is common for several votes to take place for candidates in a series of time, with each iteration becoming available to see prior to a candidate actually winning the primary.

The primary is generally a more open part of the election process, as groups tend to coalesce around the most formidable candidates. In my opinion, that is what is happening at Stack Overflow, and I think the process is open and fair.

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  • "Users who vote within the first several minutes of the election are probably rather well informed" Could you expand on this? – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 25 '18 at 18:39
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit - I am not sure what you mean, which part of that seemed improbable? – Travis J Mar 25 '18 at 23:25
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    I did not claim it is "improbable", or anything else. I asked you to expand on why you think it. Thanks – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 26 '18 at 9:28
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit - It is explained, what I don't understand is what part of it seemed unclear or improbable to you. Perhaps you are reading too much into this one sentence. – Travis J Mar 26 '18 at 17:52
  • It's quite simple really. You have made an assertion as part of your answer. I am suggesting that this assertion needs backing up with some rationale or explanation, otherwise you are asking us to take it at face value without telling us why we should do that. In other words: [citation needed]. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 26 '18 at 18:22
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit - I assert that it is probable, from my observation, that users be well informed as a result of voting prior to the notification being issued, implying they were informed that the primary had started prior to that information being released. Or, as also stated, that they were at least fairly aware. As noted, it was explained. – Travis J Mar 26 '18 at 18:36
  • An assertion is not an explanation. I guess we'll have to disagree on this one. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 26 '18 at 18:56
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit - I never state this as fact though, I only assert, by saying it is probable from my observation, which is also why it is followed by "or at least for the most part fairly aware". It was not intended to trigger people, and I would hope that it would be read fully in context instead of narrowly in a vacuum. – Travis J Mar 26 '18 at 18:58
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    Moreover, this is not even the basis for any of the explanation given in my answer. It could be removed, and the point would remain, election votes are private. Primary votes are public. Positing that primary voting influences election voting, as opposed to voting being merit based, requires evidence not presented anywhere by the OP, and it is that core amount of speculation that I am refuting in this answer. That there is only assertion in the original question leads to my using an observation here as well; albeit on a related topic. – Travis J Mar 26 '18 at 19:01

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