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Just reading the Help Center notes after flagging a rather rude comment (that I think was a joke) specifically.

Whether you've come to ask questions, or to generously share what you know, remember that we’re all here to learn, together. Be welcoming and patient, especially with those who may not know everything you do. Oh, and bring your sense of humor. Just in case.

It got me thinking - most of my favorite comedians have a very dark sense of humour and many prudish people would no doubt find their language "vulgar" whilst many others would just find it "humorous".

My question is - how best to deal with something that is presumably intended as humor, but is also using terms that some people might find vulgar? (obviously flag it, but then that just passes the problem along to a mod).

My thinking is if someone is offended by a word, that is all that has happened, they felt offense. Offense doesn't actually harm anyone and it is entirely subjective and what causes offense to one person doesn't necessarily cause offense to another (for example I find organized religion deeply offensive but really couldn't give a fig about "bad language").

Also I really hate censorship and am really not into some "flowers and ponies" sterile view of the world where "bad words" are removed from discourse by over sensitive people or prudish people.

I suppose my point is that "be nice" is a pretty much meaningless statement unless we know what is "nice" to the person who wants you to "be nice" and it can run into contradiction with the view to bring your sense of humor.

Really - as is - we specifically don't want people to bring their sense of humor unless it conforms.

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    We can leave our sense of humor at the door but some of it is bound to sneak in through the windows. And through Windows™. – usr2564301 Mar 21 '18 at 11:15
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    As with most things in SO, @Pekka 웃 makes all these decisions. – yivi Mar 21 '18 at 11:19
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    Bringing your sense of humor can be useful not only to post humorous comments, but to avoid being offended by other people's comments. In that sense, I think that line is perfectly appropriate. – yivi Mar 21 '18 at 11:24
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    @rene - "sucks" hmm - is that sexually suggestive language? – anon Mar 21 '18 at 11:26
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    The flags will tell me ... – rene Mar 21 '18 at 11:26
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    Sure we do want them to bring their sense of humor. Even if it doesn't conform. Some jokes work, some don't. Let's not kill everything upfront to prevent ever being insulted. If you are insulted that also learns you something about yourself and about the other person. – rene Mar 21 '18 at 11:38
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    I've always read the sentence as "if you see something that seems to attack you or might otherwise offend you, read it as charitably/non-offensively as you can before freaking out." Not really seeing the problem. Yes, the place is pretty sterile in regards to what kinds of edgy humour work (with few exceptions); while that's occasionally sad, it's a prerequisite for it to work. It's too heterogeneous for anything else, too many different people with different senses of humour and personalities and sensibilities. There's many many other places where great edgy/risqué/dank/dark humour lives on. – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Mar 21 '18 at 11:45
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    with few exceptions ... we wait for Will to respond? – rene Mar 21 '18 at 11:46
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    Downvotes on Meta are frequently used to express disagreement with one's premise or message, not necessarily low quality. My (perfectly justified and innocuous) first Meta post ultimately stood at -8 if I remember correctly – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Mar 21 '18 at 11:48
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    @Fraser Downvotes on meta mean people disagree. I downvoted because I believe keeping SO free of language commonly considered "vulgar" helps SO be a safer place for people of all backgrounds and beliefs. You don't want people pushing their organized religion at you. Why does that mean you should be free to push your vulgar language at them? Of course we can argue where that line should be all day. But I believe the current flagging system is working just fine for finding that balance. – Nathan GoFundMonica Arthur Mar 21 '18 at 11:49
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    we don't want people to bring their own sense of humor that's one way to read it, yes, but my reading above is arguably just as valid. I honestly don't see the problem with the sentence. Concepts like being nice, being offensive, having humour, etc. are all very mushy and in the eye of the beholder anyway and common sense is required to recognize what they mean here. This is a place to exchange programming knowledge; drama caused by overly risqué humour would be an unnecessary distraction. When I need my fill of dark and edgy I go to the comments underneath reason.com articles, or on Twitter – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Mar 21 '18 at 11:51
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    I, too, interpret "bring your sense of humor" as to how one takes up criticism, suggestions, etc. and believe the statement should stay. – Cindy Meister Mar 21 '18 at 12:41
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    "I really hate censorship" well, SO is not intended to be an open forum for free speech. It's inherently designed as a heavily moderated site designed to accomplish a very specific task. Significant moderation pains are taken to keep the site on task, and to edit content such that it most effectively accomplishes that task. There are sites out there where you can go and say whatever you want and have no concerns that someone will edit or remove your statements. SO is not one of those places. It doesn't want to be one of those places. – Servy Mar 21 '18 at 13:15
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    This is certainly unheard of. You bring up something, people disagree; but they do so because they are a "clique" and you are not in the "in" group. Luckily, you already know you are objectively right. Good for you! – yivi Mar 21 '18 at 14:38
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is clear that participation is a closed shop - would prefer to delete/"rage quit" – anon Mar 30 '18 at 12:44
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I think you're misinterpreting and overanalyzing the intended advice. There's a difference between bringing your sense of humor and bringing your taste in humor.

Let's take another look at that quoted advice (emphasis mine).

Be welcoming and patient, especially with those who may not know everything you do. Oh, and bring your sense of humor. Just in case.

My interpretation of that advice is just a continuation of the previous advice to be patient. Don't overreact or take it personally just because someone disagrees with you, and bringing your sense of humor will help you chill out when your brilliant answer gets downvotes and comments from the noobs non-experts.

It also suggests giving other users the benefit of the doubt if there's something ambiguous in their words, and maybe you should see something as a poorly executed joke instead of something more sinister. They are not advising you to force humor into posts, as jokes are often just distracting instead of useful as explanations.


Addressing your question directly:

My thinking is if someone is offended by a word, that is all that has happened, they felt offense. Offense doesn't actually harm anyone and it is entirely subjective

Offending people absolutely causes harm. There is the very obvious harm to the people who are offended, the most empirical being rising blood pressure and stress hormones. Yes it's subjective to a degree, but I think you're drastically overestimating the disparity among the community's sensibilities.

But just as importantly, offending people is bad for the community as a whole. Even if other users aren't themselves offended by a joke of questionable taste, it implicitly suggests that such behaviors are acceptable and that they might find something that truly offends them down the road. If the community doesn't moderate this behavior, pretty soon users will be more concerned with looking over their shoulder to ward off insults instead of focusing on writing quality posts.

I suppose my point is that "be nice" is a pretty much meaningless statement unless we know what is "nice" to the person who wants you to "be nice" and it can run into contradiction with the view to bring your sense of humor.

There is no contradiction. Are you not capable of being polite and appreciating a joke at the same time? Again, this advice does not give you carte blanche to make distasteful jokes just because you think they're funny. "Be nice" is a standard that communities decide on as a collective. Just like in any other crowd, you have to feel out the community's sensibilities. Here at Stack Overflow, we've decided to err on the side of professionalism. If you still don't have a sense for what we as a community consider "nice", feel free to ask another meta question for where we draw the line.

how best to deal with something that is presumably intended as humor, but is also using terms that some people might find vulgar?

Since you think others would likely find this vulgar/offensive, you should edit it into a more professional form. If it's particularly bad, flag it and let a mod decide if any other punishments are warranted. Having a sense of humor doesn't mean that you should forget our standards for creating professional content.

  • Is that just nonsensical semantic games? One's sense of humor is one's taste in humour. – anon Mar 21 '18 at 14:31
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    No, there is a subtle but important difference between the two. A sense of humor determines how likely you are to identify something as being an attempt at humor. A taste in humor determines how you appreciate said joke. You're free to ask this question on ELL (this is a joke, in case you are desensitized to humor). – ryanyuyu Mar 21 '18 at 15:02
  • @yivi - I find your tone rude and obnoxious - learn to be nice or don't comment at all. – anon Mar 30 '18 at 12:43
  • @ryanyuyu - wrong - someone's sense of humour is the fact that they find certain things amusing. Look it up. – anon Mar 30 '18 at 12:52
  • @Fraser I'm really sorry you feel that way. I hope that with time you are able to get over it and move on. Wish you the best. – yivi Mar 30 '18 at 14:58
  • @yivi - no I really want to delete my profile and have nothing more to do with you, or this board. Totally unfriendly, unhelpful and quite snide. Congratulations on pushing long standing members out - kudos. – anon Mar 30 '18 at 16:00
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    @Fraser if you really truly want to delete your Stack Overflow profile, see stackoverflow.com/help/deleting-account. Are you sure you want to delete your profile based on meta disagreements? – ryanyuyu Mar 30 '18 at 16:04
  • @ryanyuyu - I want to delete all my meta content and have nothing more to do with it - is that possible without deleting SO too? I've just no time for the passive aggressive bs. – anon Mar 31 '18 at 2:33
  • @fraser you can’t delete these posts. They’ve been answered. You could ask to dissociate your account from these posts; if search for this you’ll find instructions on how to go on. But it might be too much work for nothing. You do not need to come back to meta at all. If you do not come back you’ll have nothing to do with this part of the site. – yivi Mar 31 '18 at 8:28
  • @yivi - I'll just have to keep vandalizing them then I guess. – anon Apr 17 '18 at 0:05
  • @ryanyuyu - "Offending people absolutely causes harm" - I find your answer really offensive - so it is harmful? – anon Apr 17 '18 at 0:09
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    @Fraser if you truly find it offensive, flag it. And yes, if you are truly offended, then even this innocuous answer is causing you harm, by definition. The moderators handling the flag might not deem this answer worth deletion and judge the community's needs more important than yours. But if this answer really does offend you, might I offer a change in perspective? – ryanyuyu Apr 17 '18 at 13:08
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Responding specifically to this:

My question is - how best to deal with something that is presumably intended as humor, but is also using terms that some people might find vulgar? (obviously flag it, but then that just passes the problem along to a mod).

If you wouldn't say what you intended to say in front of your boss, your parents, or someone with whom you held in high esteem, then don't say it to us. We're professionals here and we are held to professional standards of communication.

...but every now and then, it's okay to be a little silly.