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Suppose I post a question in SO, and someone answers it. I would like to know which of the following outcomes would be considered plagiarism?

Case 1: I did not post the exact same problem I'm facing; instead, I have simplified my issue, asking for the concept. Someone answers (with or without an example) and I use their answer in my work/project/school (without citing the source).

Case 2: I used the answer in my work/project/school (no citing).

Case 3: I studied the answer but still used the same code (maybe slightly modified) in my work/project/school. (Why type your own when someone already does it? And the answer is better than yours.)

Case 4: I did extra research while the answer hadn't arrived yet (looking at documentation, other SO answers, other forums). Then, someone answers, I take the answer and modify it with code I found during the research.

I know that it would be more polite to give attribution but I'm sure most users do not do that.

Before posting, I read Would using an answer from any question and answer site in my source code be considered plagiarism? and When is using an other poster's content plagiarism. I'm a graduating student with half-year working experience, who has gone through all the cases above. I would like to know what others think about them.

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    what are you talking about? do you write an article or paper or do you write a program? – miracle173 Mar 21 '18 at 3:00
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    Plagiarism is simply the practice of taking someone else's work or ideas and passing them off as one's own. 1&2 Are straight up plagiarism - 3&4 are paraphrasing and are also plagiarism. In an academic context you must say where ideas that are not your own are from. It really could not be more simple. – Fraser Mar 21 '18 at 10:43
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    Just a quick thought: case 1 ... "use" is unclear. If you use their content as research and build your own code based on it, this is like consulting any reference material to create your own original work. If you mean you quoted their answer word for word to answer something on your homework, that is plagiarism. You at least want to put the concepts in your own words to prove to your instructor that you understand them. – TMWP Mar 21 '18 at 22:12
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    It really can be more difficult. For example, it is not my own result that Paris is the capital of France or that 2 + 2 = 4 but in that and many other simple or even more recondite cases citing authorities for known, standard facts and ideas is generally deemed unnecessary and absurd. I don't cite Newton or Leibniz if I use differential or integral calculus. But when do such facts and ideas become in need of a citation? That's the rub. – Nick Cox Mar 22 '18 at 10:22
  • In a real argument elsewhere on the internet programmer X accused programmer Y of plagiarism because essentially the same code appeared in Y's program as X's using log base 10 of a number as a start on calculating how much space to use in a display. Y's response was that this method should seem obvious to anyone with even slight mathematical background and he had just reinvented it for himself. In this argument X just seemed very silly to everyone but X, but such discussions are not always so clear-cut. – Nick Cox Mar 22 '18 at 10:25
  • "work" and "school" are very different. In most (not all) businesses, 'plagiarism' (as opposed to copyright or patent violation) isn't a thing. Much of what you describe is actively encouraged - the owner wants a solution to their problem, they don't care where it came from. You might (in coding) put a link in the code to reference why you did something, but that's it. – Rich Mar 23 '18 at 2:30
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    Asking the opposite question... In any circumstance, Why NOT Provide Attribution?. If you spent effort researching something, why not include a link to that resource that helped you. If future you or someone else is looking over it later and trying to figure out why something was done the way it was, they can explore the whole history as to where that code came from as well as any updates or comments that might have been made since. My codebase is littered with Stack Overflow URLs – KyleMit Mar 23 '18 at 17:16
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    How does what anybody else would do have anything to do with ethical behaviour? (Rhetorical.) – philipxy Mar 23 '18 at 23:55
40

Answer

As mentioned, our definition of plagiarism may not match that of any learning institution you attend. That said, I'll take a dictionary definition and give my thoughts based on that.

OED defines plagiarism as:

The action or practice of taking someone else's work, idea, etc., and passing it off as one's own; literary theft.

Merriam-Webster gives these definitions:

to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own : use (another's production) without crediting the source

to commit literary theft : present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source

So, I will gauge your cases against these definitions, highlighting important parts as I go.

Case 1: I did not post the exact same problem I'm facing; instead, I have simplified my issue, asking for the concept. Someone answers (with or without an example) and I use their answer in my work/project/school (without citing the source).

Plagiarism. You have used their work without citing the source. There's nothing in those definitions that say that the work must be copied word for word, or that it needs to meet the exact problem solved.

At its core:

  • you used someone else's work
  • you didn't credit that person
  • thus, you have plagiarised

Case 2: I used the answer in my work/project/school (no citing).

Plagiarism. For the exact same reasons as above.

Case 3: I studied the answer but still used the same code (maybe slightly modified) in my work/project/school. (Why type your own when someone already does it? And the answer is better than yours.)

Plagiarism. For the exact same reasons as above; you have used someone else's work and you haven't explicitly credited them for it.

Case 4: I did extra research while the answer hadn't arrived yet (looking at documentation, other SO answers, other forums). Then, someone answers, I take the answer and modify it with code I found during the research.

Plagiarism. For the exact same reasons as above; you have used someone else's work, in whole or in part, and you still haven't explicitly credited them for it.


Further remarks

I'd like to take a moment to look at some of your remarks in your question.

I know that it would be more polite to give attribution but I'm sure most users do not do that.

Firstly, as has already been answered, this has absolutely nothing to do with politeness, at all.

I'm not sure if English if your first language (or if you're proficient otherwise) so I'll gently explain that, rather than about politeness, this is about honesty, and beyond that, about integrity. These are far more important with much further reaching consequences for you than mere politeness.

Secondly, if the highest standard you set for yourself is the standard of others, if the level at which you want to operate merely reflects that of your peers, then you clearly don't aspire to be much. A conscientious person, whether you are one or not I don't know, should hold themselves to the highest standards.

What you're doing by comparing yourself to others like this is rationalising your own substandard academic conduct. This is obvious, because maybe other people do not plagiarise, yet you don't compare yourself to these people. In my academic experience, cheaters are in the minority.

In any case it should not matter to you what others do, it should only matter what you do.

Why type your own when someone already does it? And the answer is better than yours.

If you don't already know the answer to this (and I think you do) then you fundamentally don't understand the purpose of education.

Plagiarising someone else's work demonstrates that they understand the problem and can develop a solution. Presenting your own work demonstrates that you understand the problem and can develop a solution.

When you cheat academically, usually you're only cheating yourself. Assignments and homework are designed not only to test your knowledge, but to highlight knowledge gaps. That's why people do exercises; to stress their knowledge and skills and to identify where they need help and assistance.

If you cheat yourself into a position that you haven't earned, you're potentially not only going to create trouble for yourself, but others too. You can very quickly become a dead weight to a team of capable people, who thought you were equally capable but later find out that you're not.

Any good teacher would rather spend their own time helping tutor a struggling student, than face them after some sort of disciplinary committee.

I would like to know what others think about them.

Cheating is sad. The cases you outline are disappointing to read.

You may find this helpful; this is an example of a university's policy on what it considers that plagiarism is: https://www.mtsu.edu/graduate/pdf/Plagiarism.pdf

  • 5
    Doesn't it really depend on how much content is being copied? What if you want to know how to do something simple like a nested list comprehension, and you look at a SO answer that covers it. Is it plagiarism to use the answer to that question within your code? Of course it's not. – Arthur Dent Mar 21 '18 at 20:04
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    Of course it is. I think you're confusing whether or not it's plagiarism with whether or not it matters. If I give an assignment to a student and ask them to use knowledge learned in class to demonstrate nested list comprehension, and they turn in a copypasta, you'd hopefully agree that it's plagiarism; it matters because it cheats the ends i.e. the assessment of their ability. But if a developer needs to manipulate a nested list as part of a huge project, and so use an answer from SO, it's still plagiarism; it just doesn't really matter, because the end goal is that it just works :) – Chuppa Chump Mar 21 '18 at 20:57
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    Then how is someone supposed to answer that question without plagiarising? They won't know what nested comprehension is unless they look it up somewhere. Do we have to cite every source of knowledge we have, in order to avoid plagiarism? I'm talking simply a code snippet, not an explanation of said snippet. If a SO question poses 'How do I format nested comprehension' and the first answer is just [[float(y) for y in x] for x in l], would it be plagiarism to use that format in an answer without citing it? – Arthur Dent Mar 21 '18 at 21:02
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    By the way, that snippet is from Andrew Clark's answer on this question. – Arthur Dent Mar 21 '18 at 21:04
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    Remember that the plagiarising is more about the work that was done, not the literal answer submitted. User A and User B both attend the same maths class. They both receive the very same homework assignment. They were both taught to solve the assignment in the exact same way. If they separately solve the assignment with exactly the same working, the answers are the same, but it's not plagiarising. If User B simply copies the written answer of User A, the answers are again the same, but this time it is plagiarising. It's about passing off the work of others as your own. – Chuppa Chump Mar 21 '18 at 21:14
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    How do you define work then? It took effort/work for Andrew Clark to write that answer. If I copy what he wrote (but made sure I understood what was happening), I don't believe that constitutes plagiarism. There has to be some level of discretion to the definition, dependent on how "common-sense" and original the copied work is. – Arthur Dent Mar 21 '18 at 21:54
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    Your example lacks context; if you aren't trying to pass off the work as your own, thereby implicitly involving another party, then you aren't plagiarising. Simply copying a snippet into a small project no one will see is not plagiarism. When you pass the work off as your own, that's plagiarism. If you submit an assignment with said snippet on the understanding that it's entirely your own work, that's plagiarism. If you commit code to your company's big software repo, with the same snippet, it's plagiarism if there's an implicit or explicit expectation that the work is entirely your own. – Chuppa Chump Mar 21 '18 at 23:00
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    @ArthurDent "Then how is someone supposed to answer that question without plagiarising?" By explicitly giving credit to the person who came up with the answer. " If I copy what he wrote (but made sure I understood what was happening), I don't believe that constitutes plagiarism." Um, yes. it does, if you don't give credit to the person who came up with the answer. – Rick Kirkham Mar 22 '18 at 2:40
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    In fairness I think plagarism is rampent to an extent in the programming world, countless people daily google for things, find a snippet, copy it, bend it a little to make it fit with other things they googled until something works. Do they tell their boss all they ever did was align variable names? no they told them they made a script. Does it make it right? not really. with SO I do think there is a bigger chance because we work on things that are broken, any solution may save a company hours/days or more of saved time and money in development. – BugFinder Mar 22 '18 at 11:24
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    Chuppa Chump: "if you aren't trying to pass off the work as your own…, then you aren't plagiarising." Funny... so if I add "Don't expect that this work is entirely my own" to everything I publish, I can copy and paste whatever I want! – Armali Mar 22 '18 at 12:21
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    I'm not well-versed in US law, or in law for that matter, but I do know that ideas in general are NOT subject to copyright. So in the same manner, if you use someone else's idea, but in your own way, it won't be considered plagiarism anywhere, I believe. People use others' ideas all the time, even being unaware of it. However, if your solution has the same structure to a great extent to the other, even if you change a lot of things like method names, that would probably be considered plagiarism. – GregT Mar 22 '18 at 12:37
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    @Armali Good point, I guess the essence of it that when you are expected to include references you should do so. In the internet and the publishing world it is expected of course. But if you gave a lecture to a small audience, maybe no one would expect you to cite all references. – GregT Mar 22 '18 at 12:45
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    @Armali I'm not sure what you find funny, or what you mean. You can "copy and paste" whatever you like. People do it every day, often from Stack Overflow, to the extent that it's something of a meme. Plagiarism arises when you claim, implicitly or explicitly, that what you copied was entirely your own work, when it wasn't. I hope this clarifies what plagiarism is for you. – Chuppa Chump Mar 22 '18 at 22:13
  • @GregT see my maths analogy. Plagiarism has nothing to do with whether or not the resulting artefacts are the same; people can indeed come up with the same solution to the same question, or even the same idea, completely independently. Plagiarism is simply when someone claims that some thing is of their own making, when it's actually of someone else's. Consider it a subset of fraud. There's no fraud if you genuinely have the same idea as someone else, completely independently; there's fraud if you steal that person's idea and pass it off on your own, more specifically, that's plagiarism. – Chuppa Chump Mar 22 '18 at 22:18
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    This casts too wide of a net in my book: Apparently, I should be citing the python documentation every time add from __future__ import print_function. And that's even copyrighted. – TemporalWolf Mar 23 '18 at 23:02
14

which of the following outcomes would be considered plagiarism?

Whatever we might say here won't be of much practical value to you if your teachers, school or company disagree.

Case 1: I did not post the exact same problem I'm facing; instead, I have simplified my issue, asking for the concept [...] and I use [the] answer in my work/project/school

It is not entirely clear what you mean by "use" here. I hope you realise that applying the knowledge you got from an answer is different from copying from an answer without attribution, and also that a novel and original idea deserves different treatment than a small piece of common knowledge.

Why type your own when someone already does it?

Because typing is not the same thing as writing or creating.

I know that it would be more polite give to attribution

Attribution and plagiarism are not merely a matter of politeness. Given that you have read this Q&A, you should be aware of that already.

but I'm sure most users does not do it.

Why do you think that matters?

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    It might not be practical but it does matter to me. And yes, I know that's a huge difference between copying and typing(creating). You're right that does not matters at all. – Max Mar 21 '18 at 3:20
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    "Whatever we might say here won't be of much practical value to you if your teachers, school or company disagree." [Insert scenario where assignment is posted and answered then the OP requests the question to be deleted because they'll get into trouble with their school] – Memor-X Mar 21 '18 at 5:24
2

If the answer boils down to "use this method of this feature" or "you can find this feature by following these GUI options" (optionally "in accordance with the documentation at this link"), then I do not consider it to be plagiarism to use the answer without attribution. In effect, I am following the language or tool designer's instructions for using their product, and the answer "just" told me where to find those instructions.

If the answer is more complicated (such as three lines of code that are not in "the documentation at this link"), I make a point of providing attribution in my source code. I do this even if I have severely modified the code to fit in my source code's context. For example:

Adapted from Jasper's answer to "Thoughts on plagiarism based on mentioned cases" at https://meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/364886#364940

This means that when a developer (such as my future self) has a question about how (or why) the code works, the developer will have a pointer to a useful answer.

  • For links to Stack Exchange questions and answers, most of the link URL is from the URL of the question. The bookmark part of the URL (after the #) is from the URL of the answer's "edit" link. – Jasper Mar 22 '18 at 0:31
2

This is a fantastic question with great answers. See http://www.groklaw.net/ for more information on the actual laws that apply but also legal concepts.

This case was about copying code from SCO unix to Linux. It was found that at least some of the code was in public domain therefore able to be copied.

As a lecturer I would want you to think and to learn. I don't actually want the problem solved, I want you to learn. The distinction is important. So if you google and paste a solution you have failed me as a lecturer.

Regarding plagarism as outlined it technically is. The more important issue here is of copyright. If you post on stack overflow you are implying that you can take the code and use it. This is not about attribution but about copyright.

The works that you are creating are fully copyright. How you license that code is about how others can use it. I may choose to put my code in public domain and you have full right to grab it and use it. No attribution required. public domain is a license. GNU license is a license. Corporate code is covered by trade secret and copyright and is not often licensed.

Back to the original question.

  • If you hand in a piece of code 100% copied from the internet you have failed yourself and plagiarised.

  • If you grab snippets from multiple places and stitched them together to solve a problem. You have created a unique solution that is not plagiarised. (it does depend on the volume of the copying, see snippets...)

  • If you use libraries there is clearly no plagiarism, so use NPM or your library manager of choice. Check the license of what you use first.

  • If you struggle and implement the whole solution yourself by reading theory and implementing yourself. You have not plagiarised but you may not be smart.

Please note that what you do in University has no bearing on the real world. If you don't regularly use code pasted from the internet you are wasting your time. Use and blind pasting of slabs of code is totally different. The difference between a senior dev and one fresh out of University.

Please read up on licensing code. Understand the difference between GPL, LGPL and attribution licenses.

-11

If I understand you (I took business law a long time ago):

1) You ask on a forum how to write a script that can make a 'Tesla keep up with a Mercedes' :) 2) Somebody provides the method. 3) You put it in your 'paper' and get paid for it/graduate.

Although implied, it would still be good to ask the person giving you the solution if he/she needs attribution.

You still need to spceify in your 'paper' that the solution was not yours, although you did the research etc., the follwing method was 'given' to you by another person.

Whichever way, it does not qualify as 'plagiarsm' if the provider does not ask you specifically for attribution (because you asked the question).

If you are copying somebody elses question and answer then it becomes 'tricky'.

At the end of the day, the decision rests with your professor/minister :)

Plagiarism is very difficult to prove and teachers/professors use it to favour or discriminate against, etc....

Also, if your 'professor' specifies that 'It must be your own work', then you should not be askign the question...

Google 'Garry Kildall and CP/M and MS-DOS and Bill Gates' - that is the long-and-short of it.

Hope it helps.

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    Whether the other person asked for attribution or not is irrelevant. If it's not your work and you don't give credit to the person who did the work, then it's plagarism. Also, "the decision" does not rest with your professor/minister. Moral questions are not determined by appeal to authority. – Rick Kirkham Mar 22 '18 at 2:44
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    I didn't downvote, but these days plagiarism is easily detected. Most Uni's have software they run and verify the sources. – Jeremy Thompson Mar 22 '18 at 4:56
  • You don't seem to be aware that all content on stack overflow is licensed CC-BY-SA which always requires attribution, but even if that doesn't wasn't the case, common academic mores require attribution (and plagiary is considered academic misconduct which can have serious consequence, including getting expelled or fired), but on top of that, common copyright laws mean that the author owns that answer, you can just use it without explicit permission. On Stack Overflow, this permission is given through the fact you agreed to license all your contributions here as CC-BY-SA. – Mark Rotteveel Mar 22 '18 at 19:17
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Case 1 might be plagiarism. The rest clearly are.

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