-15

It would be interesting to have the survey include stats based on data already held in SO, such as whether someone's a moderator.

With this we could see how well the demographics of our moderators matches the demographics of the wider community; or if there's some form of election bias (either in the voting/election phase itself, or simply in who's putting themselves forwards for these roles).

In addition to doing this for moderators it may be interesting to include other data points:

  • Who's in the top quartile by score; e.g. top 10% of users
  • What gold/silver badges people have; i.e. pick a few of the more interesting badges (those which show participation in the community or worthy efforts e.g. constituent, civic duty, good answer) and see if there are any trends in certain demographics behaving differently.

There may be some really interesting finds in there; especially if then compared to other data sets. e.g. How does constituent badge winners by country compare to voter turnout for those countries? Is there any correlation between those giving a good answer and either their first language (i.e. where giving an explanation will be easier) or with their levels of education (i.e. they're better informed; or they're too well informed so struggle to put the answer in terms people can appreciate), etc.

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    Racial profiling is not a survey feature. And it sometimes has to be pointed out that the UK is no longer an empire, it merely happens to be located between India and the USA timezones by chance. Aussies never get a break. Mar 19 '18 at 22:07
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    @HansPassant but what about my plans to breed a master race of moderators?
    – JohnLBevan
    Mar 19 '18 at 22:10
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    @JohnLBevan In a wild diversion from precedence you'll just have to base your eugenics on baseless superstitions and conjecture, rather than evidence-based science.
    – Servy
    Mar 19 '18 at 22:11
  • @Servy Good plan; science tends to show people as being too equal to one another anyway¡
    – JohnLBevan
    Mar 19 '18 at 22:13
  • @HansPassant Are you suggesting using people's web cams to include an emotion score whilst they take the survey?
    – JohnLBevan
    Mar 19 '18 at 23:04
17

Showing survey results for such small populations provide too much of an opportunity for exposing private information of those filling out the survey. The results are only anonymous when aggregated into sufficiently large groups.

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    Good point. Also wow, I'd not realised how few mods there were: stackexchange.com/about/moderators...
    – JohnLBevan
    Mar 19 '18 at 21:51
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    @JohnLBevan And of course not all of them are necessarily going to fill out the survey (and also link their accounts) so that shrinks the population size you're inspecting even more. Because of this fact you'd need to be sure that you don't pick your criteria before the survey happens; you need to check after it's finished that the populations you're considering showing information for have a large enough population that you can't de-anonymize the results.
    – Servy
    Mar 19 '18 at 21:54
  • Any value in my reasking without the moderator bit; e.g. for the badges with more numerous members? Not sure what the numbers are like on those...
    – JohnLBevan
    Mar 19 '18 at 22:02
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    @JohnLBevan See the second half of my previous comment. It takes quite a lot of due-diligence in order to verify that a particular subset of the survey respondents is still large enough to not be de-anonymizing the results. It can also require some analysis of not just the number of users, but the particular results, to see if there are outliers, or other unusual results, which would provide potential for de-anonymizing the results. Honestly I specifically wrote this answer to apply to the badges as well as just the moderators.
    – Servy
    Mar 19 '18 at 22:07
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    @JohnLBevan You could potentially come up with some criteria that is both interesting enough to provide useful insight to readers, but while ensuring that there was anonymity of results (through a combination of a large enough population, even in the subsets, and through omitting the results of particular questions that would be problematic) may be possible, it's still a lot of work. You'd need to show that it's work that is likely to be worth it for a proposal to really have legs.
    – Servy
    Mar 19 '18 at 22:11
  • Good points; agreed.
    – JohnLBevan
    Mar 19 '18 at 22:15

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