18

I have some feedback on the 2018 survey.

"I identify as autistic / a person with autism"

Why can we still identify as autistic, did I miss a memo where a mental disorder is somehow something I can identify as such? Is it to keep continuity from the original questionnaire? And if so, why is the "/ a person with autism" part added while it was not in the question?

I'm mostly confused about this, but also annoyed. Stuff like this contributes to false ideas about how autism and other disorders function or manifest. It implies choice, there is none.

My main reason to repost this issue (since I reported this in the original feedback question as well) is that the results still include the "I identify as autistic". In addition, there has been a change which now devalues the questionnaire in my opinion. The answer now includes "a person with autism". AFAIK: this was not in the original question, and may be perceived as a skewed result.

Can we please leave the option of choice out of the Survey 2019, and if an answer is possible, why was it an option in the first place?

  • 8
    completely agree, this is a medical disorder and must be treated and respected with seriety, it's not a choice. – CptEric Mar 13 '18 at 14:01
  • 9
    I would suspect that the reason for the wording is that Autism has the problem is that it's an ambiguously defined term. It's used to indicate that a series of various symptoms have reached a given severity. There's often a lot of subjectivity of both how severe a given person's symptoms are, and also how severe they need to be before it's defined as "autism". While there will be some people that will be unambiguously having severe enough symptoms, or unambiguously not having them, there is certainly a range where different doctors would come to different conclusions. – Servy Mar 13 '18 at 14:07
  • Are you against having a question about being autist in general or is your request about the formulation "I identify as"? – BDL Mar 13 '18 at 14:07
  • 4
    @BDL I fully support the question regarding autism or other medical conditions, I strongly condemn the idea that anyone has a choice relating to autism. If anyone has any problem with answering this personal question, he or she can choose not to anyway. – roberrrt-s Mar 13 '18 at 14:08
  • 4
    @Servy Changing the 'I identify as' to a 'I experience symptoms that would imply autism' or something would be a welcome change of wording. As I might have not stated that clearly, my main issue with the wording is the implication of choice. – roberrrt-s Mar 13 '18 at 14:10
  • 1
    "I identify as" is quite different from "I identify myself as". – Gerhard Barnard Mar 13 '18 at 14:20
  • 4
    I identify as a purple unicorn. – Columbia says Reinstate Monica Mar 13 '18 at 14:33
  • 3
    @RobertColumbia and even though I do not agree with your chosen identity, I will defend your right to do so. – Gimby Mar 13 '18 at 14:41
  • 4
    The golden rule applies: do not disclose anything you are uncomfortable with sharing with a company who's primary business model is marketing the data they collect on their site visitors. They do have a business case for this, admittedly sledgehammery question, autism tends to be a desirable trait for a programmer but they often have trouble getting through the interview. A backgrounder is here. – Hans Passant Mar 13 '18 at 14:53
  • 1
    It implies choice I disagree that it implies choice though I don't think I've seen that phrase used for a condition before. – BSMP Mar 13 '18 at 15:35
  • 3
    I wonder if the awkward wording and use of the word "identify" in contrast to the other disorders has anything to do with the perennial person-first vs identity-first debate that's unique to the autism spectrum. – BoltClock Mar 13 '18 at 15:41
  • 3
    @Roberrrt: "I am on/identify with the autism spectrum" – BoltClock Mar 13 '18 at 15:53
  • 1
    Being borned with this or that sexual organs is not a choice either, but doomed be the person to dare suggest we should not be able to answer "I identify as [whatever]". Either go against all of these "not choices", or don't. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Mar 13 '18 at 16:26
  • 2
    @FélixGagnon-Grenier You're mixing up sex and gender. One's gender is not about the organs you were born with. Of course, many people would also argue that one's gender isn't a choice either, and that they didn't choose to be transgender, but rather that was simply how they are. – Servy Mar 13 '18 at 17:35
  • 2
    @Veljko89 welcome to the world of today. – Gimby Mar 14 '18 at 15:23
17

We asked all of our demographic questions in a fairly similar way. For this question that references autism, we're making it clear that we're concerned with how you describe yourself, which is why we used an identity-focused framework. It's not at all intended to imply choice.

  • 4
    This is highly exaggerated, but why can’t I identify as a blind person then? – roberrrt-s Mar 13 '18 at 15:37
  • I’m being overly annoying now though- I just think the current wording gives out the wrong signal. – roberrrt-s Mar 13 '18 at 15:38
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    @Roberrrt: The Deaf community would like to have a word with you... – BoltClock Mar 13 '18 at 15:38
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    @Roberrrt: "why can’t I identify as a blind person then?" Some people can. Blindness is not binary; people are declared "legally blind" who can still see to some degree. Whether they identify as "blind" or not is at least partially up to how they deal with their senses. – Nicol Bolas Mar 13 '18 at 15:45
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    @Roberrrt That's fair enough. In that question, we wrote "Which of the following describe you, if any?" Perhaps identity-focused responses are better there, too. For the question that references autism, I did a lot of research into how to best refer to autism and people with autism. Autism advocacy groups are mixed on how to approach it: some felt that "autistic" was best; others thought "person with autism" was best. I tried to be as inclusive as possible, but there's always room for improvement, though. Thanks. – kristinalustig Mar 13 '18 at 15:47
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    I appreciate your research, and value your input, I might disagree on the wording, but this answers the ‘why’ part of my question. – roberrrt-s Mar 13 '18 at 15:48
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    @Kristina Lustig: Heh, I was right! – BoltClock Mar 13 '18 at 15:49
  • @NicolBolas I was mirroring this to the survey. – roberrrt-s Mar 13 '18 at 22:24
  • 1
    @Roberrrt: Yes, and I'm pointing out that the mirror works exactly the same way for blindness as autism. – Nicol Bolas Mar 13 '18 at 23:50
  • Ah, I see, I misread. – roberrrt-s Mar 14 '18 at 0:46
-3

I think the question is vague. What is it differentiating against?

  • Is the point of the question to differentiate people who identify as a "person with Autism" versus those who identify as "Autistic" (or "Aspie", etc.)?
  • Is the point of the question to differentiate people who feel that they fulfill the diagnostic criteria for Autism from those who feel that they do not?
  • Is the point of the question to differentiate people who have received a formal clinical diagnosis of an Autism condition versus those who have not received such a formal diagnosis?

Is the question intended as a linguistic survey? Is it intended to solicit medical information? Is it intended to classify people into social categories?

  • If the purpose of the question was to differentiate between these ways of phrasing things, why would the same question include both? Clearly, the purpose of the question is to not restrict people based on how they choose to refer to that aspect of themselves. The "/" should be read as "or". – Nicol Bolas Mar 13 '18 at 23:49
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    @Nicol Bolas: Not to mention the fact that it's juxtaposed as a single option against things like "I have a mood disorder", "I have an anxiety disorder", and "I have a concentration and/or memory disorder". Really not seeing the ambiguity here. – BoltClock Mar 14 '18 at 3:51

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