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The current minimum time is 15 minutes.

My proposal is the minimum should be increased to 30 minutes.

The reasons this limit should be increased are:

  1. Accepting an answer discourages more answers.
  2. SO has a growing Fastest Gun in the West Problem.
  3. SO is suffering from Duplicate Question Infestation. More time to close as duplicate before an answer is accepted focuses resources on better questions.
  4. All the above discourages true expertise and encourages rep farmers.
  5. The median time for an accepted answer to be posted is 32 minutes. So good answers are generally produced after 15 minutes.
  6. Asking a good question is difficult and requires time-consuming effort. Waiting for and sparing time to understand solutions often require a similar effort.
  7. Encouraging slower answering will yield better quality and a larger number of valid distinct answers, and via a feedback loop you will get better questions.
  • 6
    Mostly agree, but I may be missing something on point (3). Closing a question does not prevent an OP from accepting an answer, unless the questions are also merged. – S.L. Barth Mar 8 '18 at 15:20
  • The idea is: a question will get closed as duplicate before a solution is accepted. The questioner will go to the duplicate, upvote there, and make accepting a solution from the duplicate less likely. – jpp Mar 8 '18 at 15:22
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    Cynical me thinks that the OP will accept an answer anyway... but if we implemented this, we could actually get the data and see. I for one believe it's worth trying. – S.L. Barth Mar 8 '18 at 15:25
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    FGITW is not motivated by accepted answers. Users get way more rep from quick upvotes. – Sotirios Delimanolis Mar 8 '18 at 15:29
  • @jpp: I often see simplistic answers get up to ~8 upvotes within minutes of it being posted in [javascript]. (Usually, it's on simple duplicate questions) – Cerbrus Mar 8 '18 at 15:52
  • @Cerbrus, I'm all for having a time lag for upvotes on questions too. – jpp Mar 8 '18 at 15:53
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    No, that'd mean we'd have to wait before we can end (downvote) a spree of horrible answers on any question. – Cerbrus Mar 8 '18 at 15:54
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    Ah, but I said time lag for upvote only :) – jpp Mar 8 '18 at 15:55
  • SO has a growing Fastest Gun in the West Problem: [citation required]. That's a post from 9 years ago, how is the problem been growing? In what way is it a problem, how does quality or other metrics suffer? – Martijn Pieters Mar 8 '18 at 21:47
  • @MartijnPieters, While it's smart of you to pick up on the word growing (which, you're right, I can't justify), it doesn't detract from the point that it is a problem. Quality suffers because 1-liners are not always the best answers. – jpp Mar 8 '18 at 21:50
  • Closing a question as a duplicate doesn't disable the ability to mark a post as accepted. Increasing the delay will have no impact on how quickly a post is closed as a duplicate. We gave gold badge holders the right to close posts as duplicates with a single vote (the dupe hammer), so close voting as duplicates is now easier and faster. Why would delaying marking an answer as accepted improve the situation? – Martijn Pieters Mar 8 '18 at 21:50
  • But you have no evidence that quality is suffering. Sorry, we don't just take your word for it, I want to see metrics instead. – Martijn Pieters Mar 8 '18 at 21:51
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    Your median calculation is skewed by the long tail; answers posted after years. You are looking at the wrong statistic, what is the mode? – Martijn Pieters Mar 8 '18 at 21:53
  • Would specific examples where bad coding practice is propagated suffice? Such things can't be measured with SO statistics.. – jpp Mar 8 '18 at 21:53
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I'm not convinced a change like this will have any positive effect.

  1. Accepting an answer discourages more answers.

True, but I'm pretty sure most answers are posted within 15 minutes of the question being posted. I'm not convinced doubling the "accept" timeout would have any effect, in this regard.

Furthermore, more answers isn't something we should strife for. Quality over quantity. For an average programming issue, there's probably 2 or 3 good approaches, and a bazillion hacky attempts that "work".

  1. SO has a growing Fastest Gun in the West Problem.

These FGITW answers are usually posted within minutes (or even seconds) of the question's inception. These early answers are often easy to recognize as correct, usually because they're extremely simple. They usually get more rep from votes, than an accept vote would get them. When a couple of minutes have passed, FGITW isn't relevant any more.

  1. SO is suffering from Duplicate Question Infestation. More time to close as duplicate before an answer is accepted focuses resources on better questions.

Duplicates are best handled by hammering them with a gold badge in a relevant tag. Whether or not an answer is accepted isn't relevant.

  1. All the above discourages true expertise and encourages rep farmers.

And changing the timeout resolves that, how? The rep one gets from an accepted answer is insignificant compared to a couple of upvotes.

  1. The median time for an accepted answer to be posted is 32 minutes. So good answers are generally produced after 15 minutes.

Correlation != causation. I often see good answers within minutes. I often see duplicates of existing answers added later in the lifetime of a question.

  1. Asking a good question is difficult and requires time-consuming effort. Waiting for and sparing time to understand solutions often require a similar effort.

A well written answer can be very easy to understand.

  1. Encouraging slower answering will yield better quality and a larger number of answers, and via a feedback loop you will get better questions.

This won't encourage slower answering, simply because voting is still a thing.


A major issue with this change would be an even more reduced ratio of accepted answers.

There are way too many questions where proper answers aren't accepted, simply because the OP isn't aware of how SO works, or they've left the site after reading the answer. Extending the cooldown to 30 minutes will only increase this.

  • I won't comment on the individual points yet. But I don't see why reduced ratio of accepted answers is a problem. Mine is only 35%, I'm not bothered. It's not necessarily a reflection on the quality of my answers, over time good answers generate enough up-votes to compensate for that +15. – jpp Mar 8 '18 at 15:43
  • I'm talking about percentage of my answers which are accepted. I'm not bothered about 35%. Sometimes I go for the performance answer rather than the 1-liner. Sometimes the end user doesn't accept any answer. Sometimes I'm slow and the user has got his answer and run away. Sometimes I spend time explaining an answer, when the user doesn't want an explanation. – jpp Mar 8 '18 at 15:47
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    @jpp: It may not bother you, but (imo) it's a waste if the OP doesn't accept an answer, especially if that OP comments with something like "This worked for me!". – Cerbrus Mar 8 '18 at 15:49
  • Some of the most useful answers I've seen sit beneath the accepted answer, because it gets upvoted. No harm in seeing these at the top. – jpp Mar 8 '18 at 15:51
  • True, but then you're talking long term. This change wouldn't affect that. – Cerbrus Mar 8 '18 at 15:52
  • You're right, I'm talking long term. A forum is short term, but a Q&A site should be long term. – jpp Mar 8 '18 at 15:54
  • The rep one gets from an accepted answer is insignificant compared to a couple of upvotes. Unless you hit the cap. Since accepts are not capped, together with bounties they become the only additional reputation you can earn beyond the cap. That does play a role, at least for me. However, you still need to earn the accept, so I do make sure that my answers are as complete and helpful as I can make them. – Martijn Pieters Mar 8 '18 at 22:02
  • @jpp: the OP is still the one that makes the choice as to what to accept. In how many cases where the accepted post is not the highest voted answer, was the accept mark awarded in the 15-30 minute window? Before or after the other, higher-voted answer was posted? How much have the posts been edited since? Those are all important metrics. – Martijn Pieters Mar 8 '18 at 22:04
  • More distinct valid solutions is absolutely what we should strive for. The community decides which are the best by upvoting / downvoting, which also serves as a natural motivator for good answers. – jpp Mar 8 '18 at 22:44
  • "The rep one gets from an accepted answer is insignificant compared to a couple of upvotes." This is mathematically incorrect. +15 and +20 not comparable? – jpp Mar 8 '18 at 22:44
  • "A well written answer can be very easy to understand." For you, yes. Not for the questioner or visitors, who could not come up with the FGITW one-liner. A well written answer is useless without a careful reader. – jpp Mar 8 '18 at 22:45
  • +15 and +20 are close yes. But consider 6 upvotes, which isn't unseen in a FGITW scenario. The point of well written answers is that they are easy to understand. If a answer is difficult to understand, it's poorly written. – Cerbrus Mar 8 '18 at 22:56
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Accepting an answer discourages more answers.

You're stating this as fact, and yet the link doesn't really demonstrate that. In my experiences having a high quality correct answer to the question will sometimes disincentivize additional answers, and it's possible that there is *some effect of accepting an answer, but that link doesn't really definitively indicate this. And of course what we really care about is whether accepting an answer significantly decreases the odds of an answer of higher quality than all of the existing answers being posted, over the same answers being there but not being accepted. It may be the case, but I don't think we have enough information to say definitively either way.

SO has a growing Fastest Gun in the West Problem.

You're linking to a description of the problem from eight years ago. This problem isn't really notably different now than it was then.

SO is suffering from Duplicate Question Infestation.

Agreed. How does preventing people from accepting an answer for even longer address this concern?

More time to close as duplicate before an answer is accepted focuses resources on better questions.

How does making it take longer to accept an answer help questions get closed as a duplicate more quickly? It's not like the duplicate needs to be closed before an answer is accepted either. Ideally duplicates would be closed before answers are posted (to avoid people spending time/effort repeating answers, and spreading out the useful information in those answers over more questions), but waiting to accept an already posted answer doesn't really impact this.

All the above discourages true expertise and encourages rep farmers.

How does making those rep farmers waiting 15 minutes to get their rep address the problem? I know many of them are impatient, but I don't think they're that impatient that waiting an extra 15 minutes to get some of the rep is going to stop them from low quality answers.

Asking a good question is difficult and requires time-consuming effort. Waiting for and sparing time to understand solutions often require a similar effort.

The question is, are the people that take the time to post those types of answers any more likely to do it if the OP needs to wait an extra 15 minutes to post their answer? My experience with the types of people that post answers like these, spending considerable time to write them, they're not too concerned, both because they know that there are decent odds of the accepted answer moving to theirs after they post it, if their answer really is that good, that it's likely to get lots of upvotes, which tends to have a greater impact on reputation than accepted answers anyway, and (most importantly in my mind) these types of users tend to simply not be as concerned about reputation at all. The users that spend a lot of time crafting a really high quality answer typically aren't doing it for the rep, so changing the rep incentives is unlikely to have significant impacts on them.

Encouraging slower answering will yield better quality and a larger number of answers, and via a feedback loop you will get better questions.

Given that this would only affect acceptance, and not voting, there's still large incentives to post an answer more quickly, so that isn't really going away. Additionally upvotes an earlier answer gets over a later answer will move it closer to the top of the page, increasing the odds that it gets accepted when the minimum time is hit, so posting earlier still even increases one's odds of having their answer accepted, if that's what an answerer is worried about.


So all in all I'd say that the problems you've identified are accurate enough, but your proposal doesn't seem quite as likely to have the effect on those problems that you've described.

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