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I often see highly upvoted basic questions (and answers to them), like Create a dictionary with list comprehension in Python.

While I do agree that they are valuable to the community (and thus shall be further upvoted), I have a feeling they are making it hard to catch up (in terms of reputation) with their authors by new users.

My impression is that most of the easiest (and common) questions has already been asked. It is hard for new users to ask/answer equally popular questions, thus making them handicapped in terms of reputation gain, as old users benefit from a constant reputation income due to these basic Q&As they have answered.

May we have a policy reducing reputation gain for each new upvote depending on the time since Q/A posting or its score? For example to reduce reputation gain on upvote of a Q/A by 1 point for every 100 upvotes (or every year since posting) for that paricular Q/A (as long as the gain is greater than 1).

The issue of "old users advantage" has been raised before: Advantage to Old Users, Are reputation points working as intended? but the only solution proposed (but "just cope with it") I have found was: Reputation limit per question?

[EDIT]

As Makato mentioned - we shall focus on creating good questions and exceptional answers. The current reputation policy rather promotes focus on popular questions instead. An upvote to an average answer is worth as many as for exceptional one. However, average answer to a popular question receives much more upvotes than exceptional one on much less specific topic.

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    My post now on meta.stackexchange.com also proposes no rep for new votes after 6 months: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/136059 (I can't believe that was back in 2012!) – Jon Skeet Feb 28 '18 at 18:29
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    I'm confused by the expressions "hard to catch up" and "handicapped" in this question. There may be some friendly competition around here for meaningless internet points, but at the end of the day, is there any harm that comes from having long-timers with huge amounts of rep? I know I'm never going to "catch up" to Jon Skeet, and that says precisely zero about my skills, knowledge, proficiency, or value as a person (or his, for that matter). So why does it matter? (I speak as a relative long-timer myself: I joined Stack Overflow in 2009.) – Daniel Pryden Feb 28 '18 at 18:34
  • One thing that may happen is that not much will change. If upvotes give half of what they used to, twice as many as before can count before you hit repcap. Ofc it s on when the votes came in, but as a fix it may not be as helpful in reducing rep as it can look at first glance. I''d be curious to see more data about how much impact that change would have. – Patrice Feb 28 '18 at 18:48
  • tech is always changing.. you can answer questions plaguing devs using those to gain rep. You really dont have to compete with "old users". Rep is not a zero sum game – Suraj Rao Mar 1 '18 at 6:05
  • @Patrice I see your point and agree that the change may not affect active users with many popular answers. Personally I do not like the idea of "daily rep cap" as it makes it harder to gain rep for active users (I have never hit the cap nor I am a very active user BTW). Surely, it prevents hyperactive freshers from gaining privileges too rapidly. Also it prevents reputation hunters from spending their whole time at SO. – abukaj Mar 1 '18 at 12:20
  • @DanielPryden it is how gamification works. People tend to pay attention to theoretically meaningless features as "reputation" or "badges". It is irrational, but as long as there is a reputation indicator, there would be competition for it. Even when it is no longer giving them any new privileges. – abukaj Mar 1 '18 at 12:31
  • @SurajRao surely, but IMHO there is a difference between answering a basic syntax question for a popular language and answering a very specific question which requires expert knowledge and even research on the topic. For example, I have seen a lot of users put a lot of effort answering my very specific questions. I believe they shall be awarded basing on quality of their answer, not on popularity of the question. – abukaj Mar 1 '18 at 12:40
  • I have seen a lot of users put a lot of effort answering my very specific questions.I believe they shall be awarded basing on quality of their answer, not on popularity of the question. They will be rewarded as more devs come across the issue and vote. How many votes an older answer for a different question gained has no bearing on that.. Is there? Also how will depreciating older question solve the issue you stated of new users not being able to ask basic questions? They will still be duplicates – Suraj Rao Mar 1 '18 at 12:49
  • @SurajRao There indeed is. It is because of a mechanism similar to inflation in economy. n points gained on an answer is worth much less if average answer is rewarded m points, where m >> n. I am not addressing the issue of "not being able to ask basic questions". I am raising issue of constant source of reputation gain (from popular basic Q&As), hardly available to new users. – abukaj Mar 1 '18 at 13:08
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    as long as there is a reputation indicator, there would be competition for it Sure, but that doesn't cause harm. How does it hurt the site or the community if it's hard or impossible for new users to "catch up"? – BSMP Mar 1 '18 at 15:44
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Straight away, your motivation is wrong.

You should not be thinking about creating a popular question, nor should you be thinking about creating a popular answer.

You should be thinking about creating good questions and exceptional answers. Reputation comes after that.

One of my favorite answers came in the form of Jon Skeet explaining why there was a particular time discrepancy between two dates in Shanghai in the early 20th century. The question itself is one of those "wtf dates"-type questions, so it's passed the "good" barometer. The answerers were able to identify the exact cause, which satisfies the "exceptional" barometer.

Had either poster been focused on anything other than posting something clear and understandable, neither post would've earned much rep.

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    Agreed, that answer and the most upvoted post on branch prediction failure are likely my 2 favourites and I've read both multiple times purely out of interest. Truly exceptional answers always deserve reputation, IMHO. – Nick A Feb 28 '18 at 19:50
  • I am pretty sure you do not know my motivation. All I have stated is my impression, not motivation. Basically I agree that we shall focus on quality of Q&As. The current reputation policy is however rewarding popularity of the addressed problem, not the quality of the answer. You may have an excellent answer in a very specific area of expertise which never would gain as much reputation as an average one on a very popular topic (like basic syntax of a popular language). – abukaj Mar 1 '18 at 12:48
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    @abujak depends how you qualify 'quality', I guess. You seem to focus on 'effort and expertise'. Stack was setup to focus on 'usefulness'. – Patrice Mar 1 '18 at 13:55
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I have a feeling they are making it hard to catch up (in terms of reputation) with their authors by new users

This is false. You could add a rule saying that posts can only earn reputation for the day that they're posted (just as an extreme example) and it would still be just as hard for new users to gain rep as quickly as the users with the most rep.

The real reason that it's close to impossible to gain rep faster than the users with the most rep is the rep cap. The rep cap means that the only possible ways for you to earn more rep than the top rep earning users is to consistently rep cap every day (because they all will), get more accepted answers than they do, and get more bounties.

My impression is that most of the easiest (and common) questions has already been asked.

There are an infinite number of super easy questions that aren't actually of value that people can (and unfortunately do) ask. I wish this were true, but sadly it's not.

It is hard for new users to ask/answer equally popular questions

This just isn't true. We see very popular questions asked all the time, even now.

thus making them handicapped in terms of reputation gain

This just isn't true. Again, because of the rep cap. If there was no rep cap, then yeah, this would be true, but because it exists, these questions often provide no reputation at all to the users with the most rep.

old users benefit from a constant reputation income due to these basic Q&As they have answered.

It means that some of those users don't need to post new content to consistently hit the rep cap. Of course, most of them are still posting answers anyway, and would be hitting the rep cap even without those posts.


Note that I also very much stand behind Makato's point that you really shouldn't be focusing so much on the reputation. Post good content, consistently, and the rest will follow. If you're here to try to "win the game", and not to help the programming community, then it's pretty likely to cause problems. I certainly don't want to focus on optimizing the system for those users. If people decide not to participate in SO because they can't "win the game" and that's what matters most to them, I consider that a benefit, not a drawback.

  • New Super easy questions will always turn up as new tech come up and are adopted and become popular. Devs will have to keep up with them and hence there will be questions and answers. – Suraj Rao Mar 1 '18 at 15:35
  • May you give an example of such a basic question repeatadly asked, which has not been almost immediatelly downvoted and closed as a duplicate? As a side note: if I were here to "win the game", that would mean I am a terrible player with my 901 rep so far... – abukaj Mar 1 '18 at 16:04
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    @abukaj If a question has been asked repeatedly we want it to be downvoted and closed as a duplicate. It's clearly poorly researched. We don't want people earning reputation for just re-asking the same questions over and over without doing their research. It's bad for that to happen. If you want to find an example of a simple question that isn't a duplicate and isn't asked repeatedly, and that was actually well researched, despite being simple, just do a search for highly scored recent posts. There rare (both now, as in the past) but they happen. – Servy Mar 1 '18 at 16:06
  • @Servy That is exactly what I had in mind: duplicated questions are effectively not asked (as they are closed - which I do agree is good). I didn't know that questions that are both good and popular were also rare in the past. However, there are highly upvoted old questions with no visible research effort by the OP, like stackoverflow.com/questions/231767/… (the answer is indeed a masterpiece). At the time there was python.org online manual covering the yield statement, but the question is not "I do not understwnd the docs, please help" one. – abukaj Mar 1 '18 at 16:39

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