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If:

"Stack Overflow is a place for programmers to share information relevant to other programmers" (Source)

…and, if:

"…each community decides which specific topics are and are not allowed on their site." (Source)

…then shouldn't really popular Closed Questions be re-opened?

Closed questions could be queried regularly, and if found to now meet certain criteria that they did not previously, could be either:

  • automatically re-opened, or,
  • automatically placed "back" into a review queue, for human review.

If, for example, we only looked at the Top 0.001% of Scored, Favorited or Viewed questions, we get potential criteria:

  • score of top .001% scored questions : Average = 1280
  • fav's on top .001% fav'd questions : Average = 1881
  • views of top .001% viewed questions : Average = 2161612

111 closed questions meet one of these three "average criteria". (View the list here.)

Two questions even met all 3 criteria:


I thought this topic deserved some discussion, although I imagine it won't take long to get flagged as off-topic or duplicate of others like this or this or this, although a good point in an answer by apaul to the last one:

Old questions that don't meet the current standards may be eligible for a historical lock:

What is a Historical Lock?

A historical lock is a mechanism by which moderators can mark posts as historical artifacts. Questions which are historically locked feature the following post notice:

locked by Moderator♦ Mar 16 at 20:01

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site, so please do not use it as evidence that you can ask similar questions here. This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed. More info: FAQ.

What is the purpose of a Historical Lock?

A historical lock preserves older content that was very popular when it was originally posted, but is now off-topic or otherwise out of scope for the site it is posted on. Historically locking a post ends the debate over whether a question should be kept on the site or deleted, and is often the final state of a question that has been deleted and undeleted more than once.

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    Why should we be reopening unambiguously off topic questions? You've just stated that we should, and given no reason as to why that would be beneficial to reopen questions that have been very specifically determined to not be appropriate for the site. – Servy Feb 16 '18 at 14:37
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    Honestly, the difference between a locked and a closed question is pretty small. For deleted question, this makes some sense, but questions are often deleted for good reasons, and highly upvoted questions are rarely deleted. Locked might even be more restrictive, as comments can be blocked on locked questions. – Erik A Feb 16 '18 at 14:37
  • No to the power of Skeet rep. – Martin James Feb 16 '18 at 14:43
  • @Erik Honestly, the difference between a locked and a closed question is pretty small - actually there's a big difference - a "historical lock" prevents everything on the entire post be it voting, closing, deleting, commenting or editing etc... - it puts it in a (the way I think of it) frozen and final state. A "closed" question prevents addition of answers which doesn't affect anything else except that. – Jon Clements Feb 16 '18 at 14:47
  • @Jon I didn't know it was that limiting, but I really mean: it makes no real sense to me to reopen locked questions or reopen and lock questions, since interaction is limited anyway (probably should've said just that). – Erik A Feb 16 '18 at 14:50
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    A lock also prevents flagging, in addition to the things mentioned above, which can be a pretty big problem when it's overused. – Servy Feb 16 '18 at 14:56
  • @Servy ideally no lock is applied until said post and everything related is in it's "final state" and fixed. – Jon Clements Feb 16 '18 at 14:57
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    @ErikvonAsmuth You'll find that basically all historically locked questions are closed. The whole point of the historical lock is that the question isn't acceptable on the site because it meets closure criteria. The historical lock exists both to prevent reopening, to prevent deletion, and also basically every possible interaction with the post, because the whole point of these types of posts is that they're a type of question that is very likely to attract low quality contributions. – Servy Feb 16 '18 at 14:58
  • @JonClements Indeed, which is why it should be used sparingly. It's also worth noting that preventing flags no only makes it hard to deal with problems when a mod misses something (which happens rarely, but does happen) but it also inhibits dealing with problems that arise from its old age. Things like links dying, things becoming obsolete, changes to site rules changing what content on the page would merit moderation action (whether small things like tags, or big things like what's in scope), and so on. All of those things suddenly require a big meta discussion instead of a simple flag. – Servy Feb 16 '18 at 15:01
  • @Servy I thought it was more 50/50. In untagged, 3 are closed and 3 aren't, and I've encountered more non-closed locked questions. They are all off-topic, though. – Erik A Feb 16 '18 at 15:02
  • @Servy that's why I said "ideally" - ideally we shouldn't be putting a post in a historical lock state prior to cleaning up everything and having at that. – Jon Clements Feb 16 '18 at 15:06
  • @Erik I can ask my fellow site-mods their opinions about those ones - but... why? If they're not causing harm etc... they're not serving an example of future questions (hence the banner)... what'd you expect to happen there? – Jon Clements Feb 16 '18 at 15:15
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    @Jon I'm certainly not saying something should be changed there. I'm just replying to Servy that basically all historically locked questions are closed is untrue. But I personally don't see any reason to close locked questions, since the lock message already says it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site – Erik A Feb 16 '18 at 15:18
  • @ErikvonAsmuth The purpose is to explain why it's off topic. This is why I consider Will's behavior of even going so far as to reopen those questions before locking them to be simply wrong. – Servy Feb 16 '18 at 15:32
  • You guys are brutal but y'all sure know your stuff. I disagree with certain points -- For example I believe that "off-topic" to 5 voters may be extremely relevant to several other programmers, and thus, at least some of the closed questions could make SO more valuable if treated differently. Nonetheless, this is only a limited democracy, and I acknowledge that it's veterans such as yourselves that have built this site into such a uniquely invaluable resource. (...anyhow I'll return to explaining the rules to newbies even newbier than me!) Thanks again. – ashleedawg Feb 17 '18 at 10:38
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No.

They may be popular, but they're too broad, opinion based, or otherwise off-topic for SO.

This is exactly why the historical lock exists. I see no reason to change anything about that. (Nor have you provided one)

  • "we discovered that these posts... truly start to drown out everything else on the site... it's too addictive and too easy, and in the absence of any moderation, the community would do nothing but add and upvote the easy, fun stuff. This is why community moderators have real power; they need that power to intervene, educate, and refocus the community's exuberance on more substantive content..." (The Trouble With Popularity) – gnat Feb 16 '18 at 16:59
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Sufficiently popular questions are already added to the reopen review queue automatically. For example, the second example question you linked there had a reopen review created 6 minutes after it was closed due to its popularity. Reviewers unanimously decided it should remain closed.

However, this review does not happen if the question has been locked for any reason, because regular users cannot reopen a locked question.

  • What defines a "Sufficiently popular question"? – ashleedawg Feb 17 '18 at 10:38

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