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I'm thinking about asking a question about using ECMAScript 6 in a live commercial website if it's worth considering or not, noting that 4% of the visitors still use IE11 or less.

And IE11 is still on official support until 2025 or so...

At the moment the code I write could still run in i.e. 8, but it's largely made up of "old" conventions like I largely learned 18 years ago in the days of IE4, Netscape Navigator etc.

The reason why I want to ask the question is that I'd like to poll the minds of fellow developers who already made the transition, issues they encountered, pitfalls to be wary of etc.

Most ECMAScript 6 related questions at this moment focus on specific features, arrow functions, string literals, etc.

What I'd like is what things to consider when preparing for a transition to ES6 on a high volume commercial site, where 4% of the visitors still use incompatible browsers and what strategies are proven to work or to stay as it is because the two don't mix and match. I cannot be the only one struggling with this dilemma.

But before I even start to consider writing up the question, I'd like to "sandbox" it here to prevent it from being to closed as too broad, largely opinion based, etc.

So what would be a good way to frame such a question to the active developer community?

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    IMO, it's more likely to be closed as "opinion based".
    – yivi
    Feb 15 '18 at 9:15
  • Numbers on browser adoption are easily available and the decision of leaving some users behind or not will most likely be considered opinion based. You'll probably just get a mix of people saying yes or no and someone poiting out "Have you considered using a transpiler like babel?"
    – ivarni
    Feb 15 '18 at 9:17
  • Yea, I know, according to caniuse all browsers worth noting currently support ES6, with the sole exception of ie11. But i'm missing one general catch all thing to be a starting point to be able to start out gathering arguments pro and contra, to get all the options to consider etc... Try googling the question, you'll get a lot of mixed signals, but nothing really useful when considering a commercial site. Feb 15 '18 at 9:23
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    "with the sole exception of ie11." So, all browsers worth noting support ES6. Problem solved.
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 15 '18 at 9:24
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    "you'll get a lot of mixed signals, but nothing really useful", that would probably be the exact outcome you'd get if you asked here.
    – ivarni
    Feb 15 '18 at 9:33
  • Anyone still using an outdated version of the worst browser known to man is probably used to the internet being broken. Why take that away from them?
    – user4639281
    Feb 15 '18 at 15:13
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Will the answer that you get right now able to survive the test of time? I would say: heck no. This is a more pressing problem.

using ecmascript 6 in a live commercial website if it's worth considering or not, noting that 4% of the visitors still use IE11 or less.

That's a business decision, not a technical one.

I'd like to poll the minds of fellow developers who already made the transition, issues they encountered, pitfalls to be wary

If that's the kind of answers you are aiming for, it will be both too broad and opinion based.

I'd like is what things to consider when preparing for a transition to ES6 on a high volume commercial site, where 4% of the visitors still use incompatible browsers and what strategies are proven to work or to stay as it is because the two don't mix and match

See this is where I absolutely think that you are doing it backwards. The things you should consider are the things that you identify as important. It's, again, a business decision. How much resources are you willing to invest, risks minimization, etc. There are numerous ways to go about this, in fact, Stack Overflow itself went through something like this for DNS and HTTPS. That's a more valuable experience and it's readily available.

You want to know what things consider? Look at the dev blogs for other sites. It would give you a rough estimation of what to expect. Also, remember that The Plan™ is more likely than not to change due stuff.

what would be a good way to frame such a question to the active developer community?

I can't think off hand how to cut your question in a way that it would be allowed.

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  • Yea, I guessed so much. Was hoping there might be a way to poll the collective knowledge without it being to broad, but I thought so myself. That's why I thought to poll meta first. But I see that it's really a futile question to ask here. Feb 15 '18 at 9:29
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It'll be too broad and primarily opinion based.

In the end, what matters is what browsers you need to support. The only one who can answer that is you, yourself, or your employer / customer.

You can't shape a "What browsers should I support" question into a on-topic format, for Stack Overflow.

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