11

How are Recommended Jobs picked? the text underneath the recommended jobs I recieve reads:

Based on your experience, interests, and preferences

Here are mine just from a few minutes ago: enter image description here

I really only get web development things like Django, but I've only ever answered one Django Question and that was due to it having the tag of pandas (which I do want to work with):

enter image description here

So how are these "recommendations" created? Machine Learning, tags involved in, or just "force-feed"? and how do I get the system to start giving me relevant jobs? Or must I continuously add django, flask, etc..... to tech i don't want to work with?

3

The recommended jobs on your profile (and on your Developer Story) are chosen by our job matching algorithm.

For more details, see this answer, with details about the algorithm.

Currently, the only item of your job preferences which acts as a hard filter is the "disliked tags". You will never be recommended a job which has a tag that you marked as "disliked".

We have plans to change this, so that all the job preferences act as hard filters for job recommendations (on your profile / Developer Story). This means that if you put and in your liked tags, only jobs which have either the tag or the tag will be recommended to you. This will ship in 6-8 weeks.

  • 1
    do you have search history as one of your features? I feel like that would be very accurate. I skip every django question in review queues (because I don't know anything) and never search for it. I'm just guessing, but that might be a very significant predictor if you could quantify it. Ya'll sit on some hefty data and you could really provide a ground-breaking job-site experience! I'm pulling for this to get better in the next 2̶ ̶y̶e̶a̶r̶s̶ 6-8 weeks ;) – MattR Feb 9 '18 at 21:46
  • @MattR In the quoted answer it's said that stackoverflow.com/users/prediction-data is used, but I didn't see any mention of skiped tags, it could be a good addition indeed. – Veve Feb 10 '18 at 16:03

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .