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Sometimes I ask a question on SO and a few minutes later I find a brilliant answer.

How was the answerer notified that my question was posted?

I do not think people stare at https://stackoverflow.com/?tab=interesting by pressing F5 compulsively.

Which part am I missing?

Is there a way to set up email notifications? I read here on meta that the way to use SO as a user who asks questions is:

  1. ask
  2. keep monitoring the notification icon in top right for at least 1 hour

This can be effective but it seems to me to consciously renounce to use push notifications.

  • 8
    I started editing your post to fix a few spelling mistakes but when I got to "to consciously renounce" I have no idea what that means. – ivarni Feb 6 '18 at 9:00
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    If you keep a tab open (e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/reactjs) you'll see it in the title on the tab when there are new questions posted. – ivarni Feb 6 '18 at 9:02
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    Tens of thousands of users occasionally sneaking away from work to check whether there's anything interesting to answer on the front page may create the illusion that everyone is furiously F5'ing all day – Pekka 웃 Feb 6 '18 at 9:03
  • @ivarni i never used "consciously renounce" in my life and i got help of google translator to write it. What i mean is that it would be better to have email notifications, but if i ask for this i go against the site, so i "consciously renounce"... – LaBracca Feb 6 '18 at 9:04
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    @Pekka웃 i understand. So tens of thousands of users basically enjoy a moment of pause by contributing to the site. It makes sense and the "illusion" you mention makes me get it better. In fact if there were 10 users, F5'ing all day would be the way, since there are many users we just need "an F5 here and there". THanks. – LaBracca Feb 6 '18 at 9:07
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    Tag pages are ‘live’. When a new question is posted with that tag, a web socket adds a ‘new questions’ banner that you can click on to load those questions. I use this with a combined tags page: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/254592/… – Martijn Pieters Feb 6 '18 at 9:15
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    Strongly related: Fastest Gun in the West Problem – Travis J Feb 6 '18 at 21:14
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    When you've answered the same question a dozen or more times, it becomes quite easy to quickly answer it again. Then all you've got to do is see the question while browsing. – Kevin B Feb 6 '18 at 23:26
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    "I do not think people stare at stackoverflow.com/?tab=interesting by pressing F5 compulsively." - Most people don't but some do, an that's enough. – klutt Feb 7 '18 at 10:27
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    the force and don't think... feel – EdChum Feb 7 '18 at 10:36
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    @kevin If you've answered the same question a dozen or more times why wouldn't you vote to close as duplicate? – Martin Smith Feb 7 '18 at 10:42
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    We have no life. – Tamás Sengel Feb 7 '18 at 11:12
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    @MartinSmith i do, unfortunately there’s a number of high rep users who have a habit of not it seems. – Kevin B Feb 7 '18 at 15:03
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    @MartinSmith sometimes it's quicker to answer a question than to find a duplicate. If you're not copy/pasting you might find that you're coming up with new nuances to make a better answer, or customizing the answer to the question to make it more understandable. – Mark Ransom Feb 7 '18 at 20:20
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    Most of them are Jon Skeet's bots. – BrunoLM Feb 9 '18 at 1:18
75

I do not think people stare at https://stackoverflow.com/?tab=interesting by pressing F5 compulsively.

You may be underestimating that. Or at least, there are enough good people here that at any one particular moment, somebody will happen across your question on the frontpage that can answer it. Even if everyone just glances at the frontpage once every hour while their code is compiling, that's enough brilliant people per minute to answer your question.

That's why a good title to arouse interest and a clear and answerable question is important, and then this site is extremely effective.

  • 8
    Thanks. All the comments to the question above plus your answer opened my eyes. I am a member since years but i never realized which is the real power of the community. I will purchase a new monitor and leave SO at full screeen all day. – LaBracca Feb 6 '18 at 9:09
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    That may be overdoing it. ;) – deceze Feb 6 '18 at 9:10
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    Or we just watch the live-updating tag pages. – Martijn Pieters Feb 6 '18 at 9:16
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    @MartijnPieters I tend to open 20+ tab pages so it is almost impossible to read the title when the tab is just a few pixels wide. Btw for sure a dedicated monitor is an extreme choice and is in the joke domain, but it expresses the idea. Since i accepted the answer i stared keeping SO on my second screen and i experienced the power. – LaBracca Feb 6 '18 at 9:29
  • I think that top users are like Nicholas Bourbaki: in fact, there are a pool of people answering many things at a time in paralell... – Raul Luna Feb 7 '18 at 11:33
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    As a side note, it wouldn’t work the other way round. If only a few users were constantly polling the front page, they stopped as soon as they start writing answer, so new questions posted in that time frame didn't get such fast answers. Only the high number of users can explain why so many questions get fast answers. – Holger Feb 7 '18 at 11:44
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    Now if only we could find a way to keep all those brilliant people from wasting their time reading really horrible questions... – Mark Ransom Feb 7 '18 at 19:59
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    BPS: Brilliance Per Second. I wonder if we can measure each tag on SO using that metric? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Feb 7 '18 at 20:15
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As others have said, many top users, such as @MartijnPieters who actually commented on this post, use a live feed, check during their free time, and do what they can to answer when their interest is piqued.

However, an important takeaway that I think many newer users to the site miss is the result of that process.

Sometimes I ask a question on SO and a few minutes later I find a brilliant answer.

Asking a question at Stack Overflow will immediately yield views in the first 30 seconds, even in the middle of the night. These answerers see questions as they come in, and the first several minutes are extremely crucial to the success of the question. If there is something which may need work with your question, it is very important that you are attentive to commenters during that time frame. Users generally do not immediately action a post without waiting to see if the asker will fix or improve it, and that decision to action the post will happen within the first minute or two of not responding to a comment asking for clarification.

tl;dr;
Please, when you post a question, be prepared to be attentive to comments for at least the first five minutes. If you do not have comment privileges, keep in mind you can still comment on your own posts.

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    Agreed, but be careful to promote SO as "the site where you will get an answer within 5 minutes". That only goes for the most "popular" tags (where "popular" is quoted because it seems to depend on What Is The Hot Language Now and, yes, semester starts and ends). Some highly technical questions can go without an answer for days, if not weeks. – usr2564301 Feb 6 '18 at 23:46
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    @usr2564301 - Or years, I have been in that boat before. However, those are certainly edge cases. A very large portion of questions would greatly benefit from asker attention during the first five minute window. The intention here is not to state that there will be an answer in the first 5 minutes, but to state that there will more than likely be a clarification requesting comment in the first five minutes and it is important to be attentive to those, especially if you are still getting accustomed to composing questions here. – Travis J Feb 7 '18 at 0:05
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    "even in the middle of the night" yes, because it'd be the middle of the day somewhere else. Hurray for the internet ;) – cs95 Feb 7 '18 at 10:34
  • The sun is over the yardarm somewhere in the world... – Toby Speight Feb 7 '18 at 12:32
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    @TobySpeight Yes, some of us do enjoy a light alcoholic refreshment while perusing the questions on Stack Exchange. The tricjk is to know ewhn too much a;poclic refreshment has been periused. – Andrew Morton Feb 7 '18 at 20:03
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As mentioned on your question's comments:

If you keep a tab open (e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/reactjs) you'll see it in the title on the tab when there are new questions posted.

I used to do that. But then I found a way to do more than that. I've discovered that there's a way to monitor multiple tags.

For example: You can monitor all ,, and new questions at the same time. All you have to do is use the or operator on the search bar:

[android] or [firebase] or [java] or [android-instant-apps]

This will redirect you to this tab and you'll see when new questions are posted with these tags.

6

Just for a slightly different perspective, I use the Android app, and routinely browse the "newest" question feed while waiting for my bus/on the bus. It really is constantly (pull-down) refreshing until something interesting pops up. If SO is slow, I'll look over new Meta posts for a couple minutes, then check back on SO to see what I missed.

If you browse the new question feed for ~10 minutes, eventually you're likely to see a few questions that you can give a good answer to, then it's just a matter of picking which question you want to invest time in.


It should also be noted that you can set up email alerts for new questions posted with certain tags. If I set up my phone to alert me when I get such an email, I could be alerted and get to new questions in seconds of posting.

3

You can define favorite tags, which you're interested in, and tags, which you like to be muted, so that the system prefilters the massive amount of questions to your scope of expertise.

With about one message per minute, it is easy to keep track of new interesting questions - multiply this by the number of experts in that field meanwhile online, and you get the answer.

3

You can also use RSS feeds for custom searches. For example, if you take the search mentioned by @RosarioPereiraFernandes (ie this tab) you can easily click the RSS feed link located at the bottom of the page, which in turn will lead you to this page

What I like about this, is that you can also get a quick overview of the question within each item description, meaning that you have more than just the title to go on for an idea of how interesting each item may be to you.

3

I wrote a simple command-line question poller. You specify it some tags, it then queries stackexchange api and displays interesting questions as system notifications. Very effective (some of my highest-voted answers are from this), but perhaps a little bit too effective (distracting from real work). Often I was able to see the question within seconds after it's been posted.

  • What do you mean by "interesting questions"? Does it use some kind of filter to only display specific questions? Or do you consider all questions interesting? :D – Rosário Pereira Fernandes Feb 18 '18 at 21:21
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    @RosárioPereiraFernandes: the tool filters by tags and pops a notification for each new question. Then I judge their worthiness. :) – Sergio Tulentsev Feb 19 '18 at 6:51
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I'm using bookmarks of custom search pages to watch my favorite tags. I sort by newest first and exclude questions that already have an answer and are closed with answers:0 closed:no. Before was removed, I used it in pretty much the same way.

1

If you log in to stackexchange.com rather than an individual site, it also has a filter tab, where you can set up searches across multiple sites, tags etc.

That can also be used to email you at various times (but regularly, not in response to questions being posted. It seems to be every 15 minutes at the most)

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