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First of all, to one of our dear moderators, Jon Clements ♦, I didn't fail this time. I'm objective to a passed audit.

The audit is here and the question is here.

Thank God I was vigilant and I felt a bit uneasy, and I opened the question in a separate tab to make further investigations.

Noticing its high score, I realized it's an audit, and (of course) passed it by clicking "Leave Open". Then I went to the actual question and gave it a -1, which will prevent the question from being a known-good audit for anyone else.

Reasons I don't think it's a good question:

  • There are only two code blocks of error codes, with no descriptive text around.

  • The title is very vague: Can't do X after doing Y, with no description about what happened after doing what.

... and it ridiculously got a bunch of upvotes (and a working solution in the accepted answer). I guess the answerer had the same problem at the same time, so he managed to figure out what had gone wrong.

So, anyone have any idea how and why it's a good question?

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    I'd say the amount of upvotes aren't due to the question's quality but to do with it being helpful to people with the same error. – George Jan 29 '18 at 14:54
  • @George Yup that's what I'm thinking about it. – iBug Jan 29 '18 at 14:55
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    @PeterHaddad I guess this is one of the very minority of complaints about passed audits. – iBug Jan 29 '18 at 14:57
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    Questions about a common programming tool bombing with an inscrutable error are the meat and potatoes of Q+A. Especially so when it is caused by a recent update and lots of other programmers suffer from it as well. No additional info in the question would be relevant nor required, the exception stack trace is plenty good enough. Closing such a question, possibly on its way to get deleted next, would be a giant mistake. Just don't assume it is an irrelevant question because you don't know the tool. – Hans Passant Jan 29 '18 at 15:10
  • @HansPassant Even a small difference in a minor configuration of your working environment can render the stack trace different, though I believe this isn't the case. The question, however, is likely getting useless in a long run. – iBug Jan 29 '18 at 15:12
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    @HansPassant But talking about review audits, such a question is surely inappropriate for a positive audit, despite the fact that it was helpful at a time.. – iBug Jan 29 '18 at 15:13
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    Say, when JDK rolls out its next update that patches the issue, then the question is left as a stub of nonsense. No one knows what it is, nor can anyone reproduce it before they read the answer and then realized what will have happened in the past. – iBug Jan 29 '18 at 15:19
  • To be clear, what I'm doubting is the quality of the question. I fully agree that the question is useful, but only within a limited time span, to a limited range of people (who installed the buggy update of JDK and ran into the very same problem). – iBug Jan 29 '18 at 15:30
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    Come back in a decade or so, whatever time is needed to ensure programmers don't use an outdated installer they copied somewhere a long time ago. In the unlikely case that the exact same stack trace is caused by a different problem some time in the future then somebody will no doubt add another answer. – Hans Passant Jan 29 '18 at 15:30
  • Just FTR, stuff in code block is indexed differently by search engines, which may further decrease the usefulness if the question isn't improved. – iBug Jan 29 '18 at 15:32
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    @iBug The fact that people are finding it is evinced by the voting and views. That people may be able to find it better if it is edited is a reason to edit, not close. We close questions to prevent them from being answered and to delete them if necessary. I see no point in preventing further answers here, nor deleting the content so why vote to close it? Instead, maybe figure out how to edit it to be the most useful it can be. – user4639281 Jan 29 '18 at 20:55
  • I can understand how this looks like a low quality question, but the title with the exception is really all that is needed in this case to understand what is going on. As a person not afflicted with this problem I wouldn't upvote as no information is given at all about how this person got here; software/OS versions, upgrade steps that were performed, etc. Its a bit of luck that this is a known error that is not localised and thus the information wasn't really needed. – Gimby Jan 30 '18 at 12:49
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I have edited the question to add in some prose at the very least. The added words help describe the issues given the context from the tags, title, and answer. Of course, I'm very limited in what I can edit in as I'm not the OP, nor do I use Cassandra or RHEL.

As for your comment above:

To be clear, what I'm doubting is the quality of the question. I fully agree that the question is useful, but only within a limited time span, to a limited range of people (who installed the buggy update of JDK and ran into the very same problem)

I would argue that usefulness is one metric (of several) used to determine quality. It's true that the other metrics are largely missing, but as has already been mentioned, the question is likely so highly-scored because many people are hitting this problem. For that reason alone, I would say the question deserves to be searchable, at least for now.

But on that timeliness note, just because the answer is "it's a bug in Cassandra" doesn't mean it should be closed right now. In the future, if/when the bug is fixed, then the appropriate response is to vote to close it as "No Repro".

To answer your query about "why is it a good question", as far as the system is concerned a high-scoring question with (at the time) no close votes that is relatively young and has received multiple positively-scored answers is a pretty unambiguous symbol: people are coming to this question, voting it up, answering it with high-quality answers. Given all of that, what part about this question should the system detect as low-quality?

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    I didn't visit the question being discussed. Reading your answer I first thought that Cassandra was a mythological reference to a prophet, meaning you can't really know what OP would have asked. And then it took me a long while to figure out the connection between prophecies and Red Hat... – Andras Deak Jan 29 '18 at 22:45
  • what part about this question should the system detect as low-quality? - Actually, zero-length question body (excluding the error logs) seems like a pretty good metric for questions which shouldn't be used in positive audits. – Dmitry Grigoryev Jan 31 '18 at 13:30
  • "In the future, if/when the bug is fixed, then the appropriate response is to vote to close it as "No Repro"." - no, the appropriate response is to use edits to indicate which versions of Cassandra the question and answer are applicable to. The only common context in which closing an "obsolete" question as no-repro might make sense is if the bug is in some company's proprietary web API (since then, once it's fixed, the bug truly does not exist any more anywhere in the universe). But people use outdated software for all sorts of reasons, and questions about such old software are on-topic. – Mark Amery Jan 31 '18 at 13:30
  • @MarkAmery If this were a major version and a non-breaking bug, then sure. But this bug prevents you from even using Cassandra, so no one will be using it (at least from how I read the question). Further, closing the question is not to say the question is off-topic, but to prevent people from providing new answers where none are really appropriate. But, considering that "no repro" does not have the ideal verbiage for such a scenario, I would not fight it being reopened. – TylerH Jan 31 '18 at 18:16
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As mentioned above (it helps a lot of people), this seems to be a good question not to be closed.

Another question that could be asked: Is this a good question for an audit? And it might be that all agree that audit question selection should not yield this specific question...

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