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A particular user frequents the same tag(s) I do so I see his answers a lot. I find many of them practically unreadable due to all the bold, code, links, etc. formatting that he jams into such a small space. He does the same thing on most answers I've seen so it's not a rare occurrence. I'm obviously all for formatting code as code and links as links but the combination of them all at the same time plus all the bold is too much. There's a point where so much is bold that your eye no longer knows what to focus on and it loses all its effect. See link

Because it does stand out, however, too much bold type on a page can be distracting and even disruptive to the reading process

An example: https://stackoverflow.com/revisions/48438662/1

You can look through his recent answers to see more examples.

I could go around and reformat all his answers but

  1. I already have a full-time job

  2. he would take offense and probably change them back (in my experience he doesn't take feedback well)

I've looked at the formatting help and it's purely how to format and no guidance that I saw on when formatting should or shouldn't be applied. I've seen a meta post or two about formatting non-code as code but nothing like this. This is addressing site changes to ban/prevent some portions of this behavior but I was looking for something more concrete/descriptive.

Is there a clear meta question that addresses this that I can link to him to change his behavior or am I being too sensitive?

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    In my view it's unnecessary. This compounds when you have a cold and are on cold medicine and suddenly, all of your focus is drawn to bold text for no value whatsoever. I mean c'mon. Why would you bold and code-format the word "Java"?? – Makoto Jan 25 '18 at 17:44
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    I do think it's excessive. That much emphasis scattered around a post makes it less readable. Unfortunately, if someone likes writing like that, it can be hard to convince them that they're doing more harm than good. – Bill the Lizard Jan 25 '18 at 17:45
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    My poor eyes... this is definitely not helping the answerer get their point across any easier.... – Patrice Jan 25 '18 at 17:45
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    @Makoto I'm not sure that the target audience is users with a cold (lol) but I agree with you. Some of the words emphasized with code and bold tags for no apparent reason make me scratch my head. – JeffC Jan 25 '18 at 17:46
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    Yes, well, right now I have a cold. Right now I'm on cold medicine. Right now seeing that bold text infuriates me because I know I just burned more energy than I needed to just to read it. I admit I'm also highly triggered any time anyone decides to write Java with backticks just for grins. – Makoto Jan 25 '18 at 17:47
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    Maybe it is tolerable around Christmas time ... – rene Jan 25 '18 at 17:48
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    @rene It's a good thing MarkDown doesn't support blinking text. – Bill the Lizard Jan 25 '18 at 17:51
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    @Bill Hmmm... Good idea *writes up a feature request for blinking text, and marquee support while they're at it, answers are better when they bounce – Erik A Jan 25 '18 at 18:07
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    This questions draws negative attention to a specific user and should be generalized to remove the reference to that user. Generalizing an example answer would have sufficed. – Tiny Giant Jan 25 '18 at 18:12
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    If you don't think the answer is clear or useful due to its formatting, downvote it. – Heretic Monkey Jan 25 '18 at 18:21
  • @MikeMcCaughan I don't disagree but the tags I'm talking about are very low volume so I would probably be the only one downvoting for format. I generally try to leave a comment when I downvote and I wanted to have something to back up my comments because this user doesn't take feedback well and likely wouldn't change because I mentioned it because I've mentioned it before. – JeffC Jan 25 '18 at 18:41
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    @DonaldDuck Yeah I noticed that too... I considered pointing it out but I'm trying to avoid this looking like a personal attack and sticking to the parts that matter. If he wants to draw ASCII art on his profile page, I don't really care but if I and others have a hard time reading his questions/answers because of all the formatting, then I think that's something that needs to be addressed. – JeffC Jan 25 '18 at 19:52
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    I commented on one of his posts asking him to stop and linking to this post and some other Meta posts explaining why you shouldn't abuse formatting. I also edited out the worst formatting abuse in that post, but there is definitely more to edit. – Donald Duck Jan 25 '18 at 20:16
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    @Makyen I considered that but I felt like having practically every other word as a link to the same page/class was a bit too much and made the text harder to read. In the end, the text is the same and the link is there for people that want to read the docs. – JeffC Jan 27 '18 at 18:26
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    @JeffC I'm with you, good writing only requires one font, and "detracts" quickly arises otherwise. – philipxy Jan 28 '18 at 8:43
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I'll just leave these here to answer the question of, "is there anything I can point the person towards?"

User adding excessive bolding in otherwise good edits

A user seems to be making a lot of unnecessary formatting edits

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    I don't disagree with some of the comments in those links but they address edits that add this formatting and not users that start with this formatting. I think an argument could be made that it's not worth the edit to add this formatting but it might be OK if it's in there from the start. I think this much is bad in both cases and should be avoided but I wanted to see what the consensus was. – JeffC Jan 25 '18 at 17:52
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    @JeffC why not link this question in a comment at him? – user000001 Jan 25 '18 at 18:23
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    @user000001 That's kinda the point. ;) I asked this question to either get an existing link or create a link that I could post to the user when I commented on his overuse of formatting. I want to have something more than "I don't think it's a good idea" because I don't see anywhere in help or meta the specifically addresses this. – JeffC Jan 25 '18 at 18:44
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    Or my favorite Bulletpoints everywhere – ryanyuyu Jan 25 '18 at 19:10
  • Wait, isn't this a duplicate of the Q&As you've linked here? – cs95 Jan 28 '18 at 1:39
  • @cᴏʟᴅsᴘᴇᴇᴅ That's a good question. The linked questions are about submitted edits by other users. This question is about a user formatting poorly from the get go. Is that enough to differentiate it? – jpmc26 Jan 28 '18 at 3:18
  • @jpmc26 That could be one reason, yes. Although, I thought the discussion of certain formatting habits being inappropriate, regardless of who introduces them, has been handled by those links quite well. – cs95 Jan 28 '18 at 3:27
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Here are some completely and entirely objective rules, that I totally didn't just make up, that would lead to optimal readability.

Anything more is discouraged and anything significantly more should be considered on par with spelling mistakes and edited appropriately.

Bold

Bold text should be:

  • Continuous within a paragraph
  • No more than one line per paragraph (whether that disallows bolding something that starts at the end of one line and ends at the start of the next is left up to interpretation)
  • Not in every paragraph (unless perhaps it's at the start of the paragraph / line)
  • Ideally at the start of the paragraph / line

Code

Non-code should never be formatted as code.

Code should always be formatted as code if it's anything other than lower- or camel-case letters that make up actual words or standard identifiers (I'd generally recommend also using code for the former, but some exceptions can be made).

Excessive use of short code (up to about 10 characters) sections broken up by non-code should ideally be avoided (it might be acceptable to not use code formatting in such instances, but still take the above into account).

Italics

At most 2 instances of 1-2 continuous words in italics per paragraph - these words generally shouldn't appear very close to bold text.

Links

Links are generally acceptable, as long as each link:

  • Adds something directly relevant and useful
  • Is pretty
  • Has link text of at most a single line

Lists (bullet or numbered)

Lists (including nested ones) are generally acceptable, as long as:

  • Each list has multiple items
    • And you're not just using it as a footnote
  • The items in the list should actually be related to one another

Blockquote

Blockquotes should only be used for actual quotes, which may include things you recommend someone saying (on SE sites where it's applicable) or things the computer says (assuming it mostly consists of letters).

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    I think a lot of this is rather arbitrary and sweeping. I mean, I have lots of posts that would not pass your test for one reason or another, but I think they are perfectly acceptable. – Tiny Giant Jan 25 '18 at 21:52
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    I could see avoiding the combination of formatting unless absolutely necessary (code and bold, code and italic, bold and italic, bold and link, etc.), which is ultimately the most intrusive part of the linked post. – Tiny Giant Jan 25 '18 at 21:54
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    I think I agree with at least most of this. I would ask, would you consider HTML as code and allow inline code formatting? I sometimes use (sparingly) things like, "Find the INPUT tag and click on it." because I think it helps the HTML tag stand out from the regular text. I would also add that I don't mind short phrases being bold or italics as long as it' s used sparingly. Restricting italics to 1-2 words is probably too restrictive. I often format error messages a blockquotes.. I'm not sure if that jives with your definition of a true quote. For me the word of the day is "sparingly." – JeffC Jan 25 '18 at 21:54
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    While this is somewhat arbitrary, most of these rules provide good guidelines. Boldfacing and italicizing a single important word, or something you really want to emphasize, can be helpful. Also, I can imagine situations where this is allowed. – Erik A Jan 25 '18 at 21:57
  • @JeffC Edited the part about code formatting. – Dukeling Jan 25 '18 at 22:05
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    @ErikvonAsmuth I prefer italics to emphasise a specific word and bold for highlighting, i.e. something that can mostly stand on its own (for single words, more noun and verb and less adjective and adverb). I get the desire to use bold for emphasis, but I've found that for me personally it draws too much focus from the surrounding text to be used for that. – Dukeling Jan 25 '18 at 22:17
  • @TinyGiant I'd generally discourage combining formatting, but the linked post has 4, 8 and 7 sections of bold text per paragraph (instead of the 1 or less I recommend), which, to me, seems like a bigger problem than having one or two of those code samples be bold (and arbitrarily making one bold makes a whole lot less sense than making none of them bold, which is reason enough to unbold it). – Dukeling Jan 25 '18 at 22:21
  • I have posts that have more than one section bolded in the same paragraph. If there are two important points in the paragraph I'm going to highlight both of them, not just one of them. – Tiny Giant Jan 25 '18 at 22:24
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    @TinyGiant If I have a paragraph with 2 important points that I feel need to be bold, I try to split that into multiple paragraphs or put it in a list (either of which could potentially emphasise the points sufficiently without the need for bold). – Dukeling Jan 25 '18 at 22:44
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    Usually if I'm quoting a paragraph from a language specification or wiki, I tend to want to leave the paragraph formatting alone. – Tiny Giant Jan 26 '18 at 1:08
  • @JeffC: HTML is code. Don't worry about it. Having said that, if you're going to write the tag names in uppercase, that on its own will suffice, too. – BoltClock Jan 28 '18 at 2:01
  • Related (cross site): Six simple tips to get Stack Overflow reputation fast – Peter Mortensen Jan 30 '18 at 2:52
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Let's find out. Here's the post without changing a word, just more appropriate formatting. (I've chosen not to put it in a quote block because the links aren't visible then.) How much of an improvement is this?

As your question is difference between wait(until.elementLocated(element, timeout) and wait(until.elementVisible(element, timeout) and you haven't tagged any Selenium binding so I would explain it from Java perspective.

  • until.elementLocated() : until.elementLocated() in NodeJS is equivalant to presenceOfElementLocated() in Java. The ExpectedConditions presenceOfElementLocated() is an expectation for checking that an element is present within the HTML DOM of a page. This does not necessarily mean that the element is visible. Hence no question of element to be interactable i.e. clickable arises further.

  • until.elementVisible(element, timeout) : until.elementVisible(element, timeout) in NodeJS is equivalant to visibilityOfElementLocated() in Java. The ExpectedConditions visibilityOfElementLocated() is an expectation for checking that an element is present within the HTML DOM of a page and is visible. Visibility means that the element is not only displayed but also has a height and width that is greater than 0. Again this does not necessarily mean that the element is interactable i.e. clickable.

  • I think it looks a lot better. I'm still not a big fan of the repeated small code blocks. I ended up rewording it to remove some of the repetition. Take a look at it and see if you think it's better. – JeffC Jan 28 '18 at 2:39
  • @JeffC Yeah, I know it's been cleaned up now. I was just initially a little skeptical that the poor use of formatting was a huge problem, but having removed it, I think I agree. – jpmc26 Jan 28 '18 at 3:16

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