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According to Why are answers for completely unrelated languages attempts to answer the question? , answers that attempt to answer a question other than the one asked, for instance by answering with a different programming language than the question-asker was using, are not NAA and should not be flagged or deleted as part of review.

Does this apply to answers that attempt to answer a non-programming question when posted to a programming question?

For example (Thanks to @Kendra and @ryanyuyu for asking for clarification on associated questions):

Q: Why can't I edit a string in Java without creating a new string object?

A: Beryllium has four protons. See this essay on Moby Dick for more information.

Q: Why does this C program crash with a Segmentation Fault?

A: This is failing because you can't run a Diesel engine on gasoline.

Q: How do we know that JavaScript is Turing Complete?

A: In the universe of My Little Pony, Princess Luna was banished for a thousand years.

Let's look at the third "answer" according to the criteria given at https://meta.stackoverflow.com/a/265553/6471538 , where a taxonomy (possibly not exhaustive) of NAA answers are given:

Thanking the posters

Is a factual statement about the plot of My Little Pony a "thank you" message? I think not.

Asking a new question

A factual statement is not a new question.

Asking for clarifications

Again, a factual statement is not a question, even if it is wrong or not useful.

'Bumping' the question

A completely irrelevant answer could be an attempt to bump the question, but the guidance indicates that this really refers to "me too"/"I'm having the same problem!" answers.

Links to an answer

There is no link in the answer and thus it cannot be a link-only answer.

The "answer" isn't a thanks, a new question, a request for clarification, a bump, or a link-only answer, so it would seem to pass the NAA test, but....it's not useful to persons facing the problem specified in the associated question. So, is that downvote only and move on? Should I raise a different flag (VLQ? Rude or Abusive? Custom mod flag?)? Is there (or should there be) another category of NAA of "Is an answer, but not a programming answer"?

A marginally better "answer":

What about this "answer"?

Q: This Lisp code seems to run forever and consume all of my system's RAM, why?

A: The Great Old Ones are angry and are trying to prevent your goals from being reached. Pray : "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn!" and they will rise from the abyss in which they sleep and grant you blessings. Iä! Shub-Niggurath! Iä!

Here is an answer which is more clearly a highly misguided attempt to answer the question (in that they are claiming that the question-asker's underlying problem is religious in nature). Is it any different in terms of NAA? Is it non-NAA but flaggable as VLQ? Rude or Abusive? Spam (as a form of religious proselytism)? Downvote only and move on?

Question Rationale

One might argue that the question I am asking here is highly nitpicky and that I should recognize that all of the example "answers" here are crappy and should be sent straightaway to the bit bucket through whatever mechanisms are most convenient at the time. I know that. I have, however, gotten too many more-or-less "Yeah, this was a crap post, but I don't agree with the flag you used, Declined" reactions from the moderators, so it is only natural for me to seek out highly detailed information so that I (and we!) can win the "pick the right flag" game.

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    for example, if someone asked how to foo the bar and someone answered "you should try riding tony the pony"? that's just a not useful answer. but... it is an answer. – Kevin B Jan 18 '18 at 21:49
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    @Kendra when a user posts a non-programming answer to a programming question. – Robert Columbia Jan 18 '18 at 21:50
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    I'm confused by your question. Is the question in question on topic? Or does just have a non-programming side-question that and answer tries to answer, instead of the main question? – ryanyuyu Jan 18 '18 at 21:54
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    @ryanyuyu The question itself is on topic, the answer is the odd one out. It was a bit confusingly worded originally. I think the edit helps clarify. – Kendra Jan 18 '18 at 21:54
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    I think I confused myself. Although corresponding example question of those example "answers" would have been helpful for discussion. – ryanyuyu Jan 18 '18 at 21:56
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    Technically... with 0 knowledge of JavaScript, someone might think there is a My Little Pony library/JavaScript program where there is such a programming concept as a "Princess Luna" being "banished for a thousand years" and could take that as reasoning for why JavaScript is Turing complete. Hell, even with JavaScript knowledge I would accept that as as good an answer as any. – user4639281 Jan 18 '18 at 22:15
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    Lo and behold, there is a My Little Pony JavaScript library. of course there is, why would there not be a My Little Pony JavaScript library? – user4639281 Jan 19 '18 at 0:56
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    Ah yes, I remember why I don't use that description anymore: because I don't like having to spell these things out, because spelling them out just creates more potential loopholes for people to attack. I dunno, maybe this is just me, but I don't think it takes a lawyer or professor to tell that these answers, consisting of lone statements that are 100% non-sequitur on a programming site, don't belong. I'm sure other moderators will have no trouble recognizing these as NAA in much the same way we recognize unsolicited advertising as spam. Right Martijn? Right? – BoltClock Jan 19 '18 at 5:33
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    probably related: Using NAA on jokes that make no attempt to answer the question – gnat Jan 19 '18 at 9:37
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    The root of the problem seems to be that everyone is interpreting the use of the NAA flags in different ways. If the use of a flag isn't obvious to the vast majority of users, then that flag is bad and it needs to go. Nobody should need to be a lawyer, read half of meta or know about the inner workings of review queues etc when picking a flag. Since everyone on meta seems completely anal about the use of the NAA and VLQ flags, perhaps these flags should simply be nuked and replaced with something that makes more sense. – Lundin Jan 19 '18 at 14:55
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    @Lundin if moderators weren't so anal about them, perhaps we wouldn't. I have gotten too many "Yeah, this was a crap post, but I don't agree with the flag you used, Declined", so it is only natural for me to seek out highly detailed information so that I can win the "pick the right flag" game. – Robert Columbia Jan 20 '18 at 13:22
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    Sometimes I think that all the flags should be replaced with a single "OMG Problem!" flag that requires the flagger to download, fill out, and upload the correct cover sheet in triplicate as a ZIP file between 5 and 20 MB in size. – Robert Columbia Jan 20 '18 at 14:37
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    Not sure if those examples (about ponys and apples etc) are helpful here, why not stick to what we actually deal with on a day to day basis: Someone asks how to cast a string to a float and someone's answer tells how to convert a float to a string. It doesn't answer the question, so for sure it is not an answer. But if it qualifies as NAA is apparently disputed heavily here, although the meaning of the words not an answer is NAA. – ImportanceOfBeingErnest Jan 21 '18 at 16:52
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    @ImportanceOfBeingErnest it's called reductio ad absurdum and it tries to illustrate how impractical policies are, or that policies leads to absurd results. – Braiam Jan 22 '18 at 15:13
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According to [...], answers that attempt to answer a question other than the one asked [...] are not NAA

That's not what you were told. You were told that answers that attempt to answer the question are answers, even if they fail in their attempts to answer the question. A post doesn't become NAA just because you don't think it succeeds in answering a question, so long as the author is making a sincere attempt to answer the question.

There's more than enough evidence that an answer like your example is not even attempting to answer the question. It's not a failed attempt, it's just someone trolling; they honestly know that what they posted isn't an answer to the question. That said, for such a case I wouldn't even flag it as NAA (even though it's not an answer) I'd flag it for a mod to look at, because it's abusive and almost certainly requires moderator intervention in addition to deletion.

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    Keep in mind that it has to be reasonably obvious to someone without domain knowledge that the post is not even remotely attempting to address the question. If it looks like it might be an attempt to someone with no domain knowledge, then it should not be flagged and should instead be downvoted and delete voted. (no filtering in the LQPRQ) – user4639281 Jan 18 '18 at 22:11
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    @TinyGiant Hence why I said that if you see something that is an answer, but so egregious off that it's obvious the author wasn't even trying to answer the question (like in the examples provided) you should be casting a mod flag, not NAA (even though the post is technically NAA). Not only is there a good chance the mod will do something other than just delete it, but it gives you an opportunity to explain the flag more; to explain why the post is so bad that even the author must have known it wasn't an answer. – Servy Jan 18 '18 at 22:14
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    NAA is now meaningless. Anything that is grammatically correct is now "an answer" even if it has nothing to do with anything. – Draco18s Jan 18 '18 at 22:20
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    @Draco18s What's your basis for that statement? The only one who I've seen say that is you. I certainly said no such thing. – Servy Jan 18 '18 at 22:21
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    @Servy You asked a question, I shall answer it thusly: "Captain Jack Harkness once rode on the outside of the Doctor's Tardis to the end of the universe." – Draco18s Jan 18 '18 at 22:23
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    @Draco18s You're not actually proving your point. I never said that such a response is actually an answer. In fact, I specifically said that it isn't an answer. I said that you should use a mod flag for such an answer, rather than NAA, as it's the best way to resolve that particular type of non-answer. Did you just not get around to reading the second half of my answer? Or are you just actually trolling, rather than pretending to be trolling. – Servy Jan 18 '18 at 22:27
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    yea, that's still NAA. but NAA isn't the only flag we have. Flagging spam/abuse as NAA isn't that useful – Kevin B Jan 18 '18 at 22:27
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    @Kevin B: I mean, seriously, why is it so hard for everyone else to grasp that "NAA is for the following enumerated obvious cases and custom flags are for everything else"? – BoltClock Jan 19 '18 at 5:39
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    i dunno. maybe some combination of following the guidelines/words too literally and wanting less objectivity. i mean, we're developers afterall ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ – Kevin B Jan 19 '18 at 5:49
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    I doubt it. If people actually followed, to the letter, the NAA guidelines of only using it for the listed cases and custom for everything else, nobody would be complaining about their NAA flags getting declined - the majority of complaints we'd be getting would be about custom flags, which are at least, by definition, more interesting to discuss. Usually. – BoltClock Jan 19 '18 at 6:12
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    oh, i meant less subjectivity, less opinion. but meh. It is pretty well outlined – Kevin B Jan 19 '18 at 6:26
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    If an answer does not answer the question, it is NAA. Read the flag description. It doesn't matter what the answerer's intention was. We only care about technical quality. We don't care about "feelings" and "intentions". If I ask how to print "hello world" and someone gives me an answer for how to cook noodles, because in their insane mind they think that is the correct answer, then the answer should naturally be deleted because it is NAA. The "intention" of the answerer be damned. – Lundin Jan 19 '18 at 10:13
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    According to this answer, if I go and answer a PHP question with c# code which actually answers the question, it is actually an answer and cannot be flagged otherwise. The flag system is broken – SO used to be good Jan 19 '18 at 10:22
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    @Lundin Did you actually read the flag description? I'll quote it for you here anyway, "This was posted as an answer, but it does not attempt to answer the question. It should possibly be an edit, a comment, another question, or deleted altogether." And again for emphasis, "it does not attempt to answer the question". Just in case you missed it, it says, attempt in there. We absolutely care about what the intentions of the answerer are. – Servy Jan 19 '18 at 14:25
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    Sorry but Stack Overflow is a technical Q&A site about programming. We do not care about intentions, but technical quality and accuracy. Preserving utter crap answers that are not anywhere near technically correct fills no purpose, which is obvious to anyone with common sense. Stack Overflow does not exist for the purpose of making some fanatic literalists on meta happy, it exists for the purpose of high quality programming Q&A. An answer which is incorrect makes the site worse and therefore needs to be deleted. How anyone can even raise an argument against that is truly beyond me. – Lundin Jan 19 '18 at 14:44
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I really need to quote Shog in this one, because stuff is just beyond ridiculous:

But is Orange an apple, @Marti? If I ask you for an apple and you hand me an orange, are you fulfilling my request? There are plenty of places to get oranges if that's what I want; there are plenty of ways to get rid of an orange if you're determined to do so. But if you go to an apple market, you'll be expected to trade in apples; in the same way as when you go to a question on a Stack Exchange site, the expectation is that you'll want to read or provide an answer. – Shog9♦ Feb 23 '16 at 17:32

If I ask you for an apple that can be made into a pie while maintaining a complex flavor and holding its shape... And you give me a Red Delicious... That's a wrong answer, @Marti. If you give me an orange, you're not even wrong; you haven't answered at all. We can rank every apple on earth according to its suitability for an apple pie, but there is no useful score for an orange when it comes to this purpose. Similarly, no amount of downvoting will turn "I have this problem too, halp?" into even a wrong answer. – Shog9♦ Feb 23 '16 at 18:10

And my point, @JPmiaou, is that we're not here for things that bear superficial resemblances to answers, for whatever words someone cares to type into the form. We're here for answers. They won't always be correct, but they'll damn well be recognizable as an honest attempt to answer the damn question and not just share your train of thought with the world. – Shog9♦ Feb 24 '16 at 3:27

Bold formatting for the parts that, well, should be bold. Interpret at your own peril as I rest my case.

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    None of the bolded parts really apply here as far as I can tell. This isn't talking about questions in the form of an answer or requests for clarification or such (which is what Shog is talking about there). This seems to be mainly talking about answers that are answers, they just don't attempt to answer the question asked whatsoever, which is an entirely different scenario than what Shog is talking about, except for the last comment, which really says too little on the topic to be widely useful as an answer to this question. – user4639281 Jan 19 '18 at 0:39
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    @TinyGiant How about this proposed change to the flag description then? "This was posted as an answer, but it does not address the problem being asked about. It should possibly be an edit, a comment, another question, or deleted altogether." (the bold comes from source) I think Shog is pretty clear that any attempt of answering, that doesn't even phantom the topic is being asked about, it's not an answer to the question. – Braiam Jan 19 '18 at 0:43
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    Shog views are definitely that off topic answers (like the ones on the example) aren't answers. – Braiam Jan 19 '18 at 0:44
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    If it requires any amount of domain knowledge whatsoever to come to the conclusion that the post does not attempt to answer the question, or it may appear to someone as an attempt to answer the question, it should not be flagged at all. If it is obvious that the answer is not an attempt to answer the question to everyone who could possibly view the answer, then it could be flagged as NaA. The caveat there is that there can be absolutely no doubt that it in no way attempts to answer the question. But again, this is only a secondary use for the NaA flag, which it was never intended to fill – user4639281 Jan 19 '18 at 0:46
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    @TinyGiant [citation needed] really, I need to know who the heck ever said such absurdity that gets tossed around with such frequency. – Braiam Jan 19 '18 at 0:48
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    Uhm... the fact that it is impossible to filter by tag in the LQPRQ indicates that reviewers in that queue should not be required to have domain knowledge to evaluate the review task. It's built into the queue. If they wanted people to have domain knowledge when reviewing tasks, they would have added an option to filter by tag. If you know that the flag is going to put the post in a queue where it is likely to be reviewed by users who have no domain knowledge, why would you flag a post that required domain knowledge to review? – user4639281 Jan 19 '18 at 0:50
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    @TinyGiant oh boy, you really think that the LQPRQ lacks tag filters? (from SU) Now, another source I can debunk? (one from SO, so you can't claim I had manipulated the image i.stack.imgur.com/2HULg.png link for that particular review here stackoverflow.com/review/low-quality-posts/723577) – Braiam Jan 19 '18 at 0:58
  • Weird, that has not always been there (IIRC it was removed when questions were removed from the LQPRQ, it looks like it has made its way back). Regardless it is commonly held that posts which require domain knowledge to review should not be flagged as NaA. As always, simply telling people to disregard community consensus and abuse the system is not helpful. – user4639281 Jan 19 '18 at 1:01
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    @TinyGiant I recommend that before you ever, ever give an information to anyone, at least take the decency of verifying your claims. If I didn't knew you better I could think you never visited the low quality review queue. – Braiam Jan 19 '18 at 1:02
  • I actually do visit it regularly and know that there was a time when there was no filter in the LQPRQ on Stack Overflow, I just don't know when that ended. The fact that you're latching on to that one part of the argument shows that you don't really have much of (actually any) argument here. All you've argued is that Shog said something really general in a comment a year ago which you pulled out of context and interpreted to mean whatever it is that you want it to mean. – user4639281 Jan 19 '18 at 1:06
  • Well @tiny, maybe you are confusing things with the triage queue which still is one of my grips about that queue. – Braiam Jan 19 '18 at 1:16
  • What about a pear? For example, adding a swift answer to an objective C question? – Chris Stratton Jan 21 '18 at 3:42
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    @ChrisStratton is the question asking for a Obj-C solution or a solution to a problem that can be solved with either Obj-C or Swift? – Braiam Jan 23 '18 at 15:39
  • @Braiam - most of the time only one is applicable to the asker but either could be applicable to other readers - because while you can call one from the other, SO questions tend to be about small problems within larger pieces of code, so the changing languages for just one problem is rarely justified. – Chris Stratton Jan 23 '18 at 16:07
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    @ChrisStratton Is this an objetive c question? stackoverflow.com/q/355168 I would say "no". Meanwhile this one stackoverflow.com/q/11013587, I would say "yes". I know nothing about either swift or obj c, yet I'm confident enough to identify whenever it's a language/framework agnostic question or not from context. – Braiam Jan 23 '18 at 16:28
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Think about it this way.

An answer that gives an answer in a different language is an attempt to answer the question. Why? Because they are directly addressing the problem and giving a solution to it. Bad or wrong? Totally, not at all the language the OP was looking for. Answer? Totally, it is giving a solution, however wrong given the language requirement, to the problem posed.

However, an answer that is 100% unrelated to the question at hand and obviously so even to someone with no domain knowledge? Not an answer. Why? Because it doesn't even try to address the problem in the question.

I think you've been focusing on the wrong point. Not everything posted in the answer box is an answer, even if it's an answer to a completely unrelated question.

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    So long as that is clear from the answer to someone with no domain knowledge. You can't filter by tag in the LQPRQ (where these flags end up, unless they end up in front of a moderator). – user4639281 Jan 18 '18 at 22:09
  • I figured "100% unrelated to the question at hand" made that obvious, but I'll edit to clarify. Thanks! – Kendra Jan 18 '18 at 22:13
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    @Kendra There's no real reason to even be looking at the question in LQP, because whether or not a post is an answer really has nothing to do with the question. – Servy Jan 18 '18 at 22:16
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    @Servy By that logic, anything that looks like it could answer any post could be an answer. Such as, "How do you foo the bar in C" being answered with "In JavaScript, you can create an array by doing x y z." Which... Is very clearly not an answer. It has nothing to do with the problem at hand and doesn't even try to answer the question... But you only know that by looking at the question. – Kendra Jan 18 '18 at 22:17
  • @Kendra Have you not read my answer? – Servy Jan 18 '18 at 22:19
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    @Servy I wasn't responding to your answer. I was responding to your comment which asserts that whether an answer is or is not an answer has nothing to do with the question. My comment shows a case that disproves your comment. If I was trying to disprove your answer I would comment there. – Kendra Jan 18 '18 at 22:20
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    @Kendra And my answer addresses the issue in detail. I don't see the need to repeat the same information in a comment to you now. If you've read my answer, then you understand my response to your comment. If you haven't, then you can now read it to see my response to that comment. – Servy Jan 18 '18 at 22:23
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    I have tried to find a way to word my response politely and failed, so I will just leave you with this, @Servy: I was not responding to your answer and should not have to read your answer to respond to your comment on a different post. – Kendra Jan 18 '18 at 22:31
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    @Kendra I'm well aware that you were not responding to my answer. I have specifically told you that my answer is my response to your comment. If you would like to see my response to your concerns, you can read my answer. I'm not going to repeat it here. If you aren't interested in my response to your concern, you are entirely free to not read my answer. – Servy Jan 18 '18 at 22:34
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According to your own examples:

Q: How do we know that JavaScript is Turing Complete?

A: In the universe of My Little Pony, Princess Luna was banished for a thousand years.

That's Not An Answer. It is an answer to a question, but it is not an answer to the question.

  • However, a JavaScript answer to "How do I foo the bar in C?" is an answer. How is this different? – Robert Columbia Jan 18 '18 at 22:05
  • See: meta.stackoverflow.com/q/286229/4639281 – user4639281 Jan 18 '18 at 22:07
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    @TinyGiant So the apples comparison is no longer accurate? Princes Luna has nothing to do with JavaScript. It is an orange to the apple. – Draco18s Jan 18 '18 at 22:13
  • Says someone who knows something about JavaScript. See my comment above – user4639281 Jan 18 '18 at 22:15
  • @Draco18s The apples comparison wasn't even accurate when it was written. The policy that an answer by someone who misunderstood the question is not "NAA" is older than that post. – Sam I am Jan 18 '18 at 22:18
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    @TinyGiant Oh my god. The NAA flag is now meaningless. There are now no posts that could ever be flagged NAA, as any attempt to write anything that it grammatically correct could be seen by someone "with no domain knowledge" as being a valid attempt to answer. – Draco18s Jan 18 '18 at 22:19
  • @Draco18s If it looks like the answer-er intentionally posted an unrelated post, then the NAA flag would be valid. – Sam I am Jan 18 '18 at 22:21
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    well, no. Someone answering "How can i foo the bar?" is objectively not an answer, without any need of domain knowledge. It is in fact a question. – Kevin B Jan 18 '18 at 22:21
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    Well... no. NaA is still useful for what it was originally intended for: questions in the form of answers ("Did you ever figure this out?", "Thanks for the answer @xyz, but if my bar is yellow how do I do Z?"). requests for clarification ("What was the error exactly?", "Could you provide an MCVE?"), etc, etc. Things that are not actually answers because the thing that they are is mutually exclusive of being an answer. – user4639281 Jan 18 '18 at 22:22
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    @Draco18s and before you ask me how we judge intent, the vast majority of users on SO have 20+ years of experience in judging other people's intent based on their actions and other contexts. You could say we're experts in judging intent. – Sam I am Jan 18 '18 at 22:22
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    With the given example, you could argue that the Question should be flagged as "too restrictive", because a correct answer is not at all about Javascript but about "What is a Turing Complete language ?". With such question should an answer like "Because you can implement a Turing machine with it" which is correct should be discarded because it's not about Javascript ? It's not uncommon that answers have to fix questions that are missing the core point. In some cases best answers could be along the line "You shouldn't do that, but do something else instead". – kriss Jan 19 '18 at 3:15

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