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I recently asked a question on Stack Overflow, and it received 94 views, but yet, no answers. I edited the question to make it easier and more clear to answer it, but yet, still no answers.

And this isn't a problem that's unique to me, there are nearly 2 million questions posted on Stack Overflow that don't receive any answers at all. And over 3 million without an accepted answer. In addition there are more than 725 thousand questions that have no answers and were viewed less than 50 times, that's almost 40% of all unanswered questions. There's also nearly 1.5 million questions without an accepted answer and were viewed less than 50 times.

Now tell me there isn't a problem.

Now granted, a lot of these questions might be not specific or too broad or have some other reason why they weren't answered, but if this is the case, then it should be flagged as such and let the user who posted the question to fix the question or delete it. But most of them simply didn't have the right person view their question who could help solve their question.

And sure, a lot of the users that posted an unanswered question on this site might be inactive nowadays but this is a community and other people should be able to know the answer to their own question without having to ask the same question again.

And while the Community ♦ moderator does offer bounties on random unanswered questions I feel like Stack Overflow should have an additional tab on the Questions page called Recommended. This tab will list a bunch of questions without an accepted answer that are ranked by the predicted user's ability to solve a certain question based on the tags they use in their own questions or based on the tags used in previous answers the user gave. If the question has been flagged it will not show up in this tab. The less answers on a question the higher the chance it will pop up on the user's Recommended tab. There should also be some kind of cap on the number of users that receive the same question in their Recommended tab; I suggest that the cap should be somewhat related the the number of views on a question.

This would allow questions like mine that weren't lucky enough to have the right person view their question would have a better chance at finding the right person to answer the question. And hopefully that answer will be the correct one and be accepted as such.

In Response to JDB:

Tell me how often you think comments answered a question. I would guess almost none of the questions got their question answered in the comment. And how many people realistically search using the parameters you used?

There are over 1.6 million questions that had a score of 0 or higher, are still currently open, AND had an accepted answer. There are also 145 thousand questions that also have under 50 views in addition to the conditions listed previously. In addition, just over 58 thousand of those questions were just last year as well.

Now, there are 151 thousand with no answers, less than 50 views, and less than 3 comments. Now there are 352 thousand questions that don't have accepted answers, less than 50 views, and less than 3 comments. And reducing those conditions to last year makes it nearly 105 thousand without no answers and over 190 thousand with no accepted answer.

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    I mean, it's certainly possible a lot of people just skipped it because of how big it is. Surely something with that much copy and code hasn't been reduced enough kind of thing. – Kevin B Jan 17 '18 at 17:30
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    and... after reading through the whole thing, it just looks like a work request. You don't appear to really have a problem... other than not knowing how to move forward. I'd skip too. – Kevin B Jan 17 '18 at 17:33
  • @KevinB It's a site wide problem. I was using my question as an example. I'm just suggesting a way to get unanswered questions answered. I'm sure my question isn't of much importance compared to other unanswered questions. – ChippeRockTheMurph Jan 17 '18 at 17:35
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    I don't think it is. The interesting and useful questions get answered quickly, because they're interesting and useful. The others don't. – Kevin B Jan 17 '18 at 17:35
  • @KevinB Questions that are easier to answer get answered much quicker and often then harder questions. There should be answers to more complex questions rather than just basic questions. And if nobody wants to answer my question that's fine, but there are 2 million other questions that don't have any answers at all. – ChippeRockTheMurph Jan 17 '18 at 17:37
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    Right, but, the ultimate goal is to have a repository of useful questions and answers. There's no real incentive to getting a question that almost no one will benefit from other than the OP answered. – Kevin B Jan 17 '18 at 17:38
  • @KevinB What I'm asking is how to assemble a list of title's of HTML elements. I'm not sure how that's not relevant at all to anybody. Anyways, the main focus is again on the unanswered question problem, not just my own. – ChippeRockTheMurph Jan 17 '18 at 17:41
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    We have bounties, we have community's auto bumps, we have edit bumps, we already show 'tag relevant' questions to people.... I don't see this as being as big a problem as you. If we dig in these 2million questions, how many TRULY deserve an answer, and how many of these answers would truly help accomplish the site's goal? I think that number will be way smaller than 2 million. And as everything when looking at a site this massive... ratio is more important than absolute number. – Patrice Jan 17 '18 at 17:49
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    FYI, there is actually an "unanswered" tab, which contains a sorted page of unanswered/not accepted questions. This is somewhat similar to your "recommended" tab proposal. – abccd Jan 17 '18 at 17:56
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    I like the current system -- it puts the main responsibility of making the question as clear and answerable as possible on the person asking, and that's as it should be since this is, after all, a volunteer-staffed site. If you the asker want to improve your chances of getting an answer, then strive to make it easy as possible to understand your problem and code in a clear and succinct question. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 17 '18 at 19:53
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    Why would such a tab of unanswered questions be titled 'Recommended'? Would not 'Unwanted' be a better titile? If you really want to lower the already low amount of unanswered questions, why not umm.. answer some of them? – Martin James Jan 17 '18 at 20:02
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    @ChippeRockTheMurph 'simple/complex' is not an overriding reason for questions getting attention or no. Try and put yourself in front of the other users' box as they look at Q's. You need to frame your Q so as to avoid reactions like 'Meh - mutiple pages of HTML/JS/CSS.jQuery/whatever, no clue as to where the problem is, or even if there is a problem, prolly another works request, but I can't be bothered to look through all that crap to be sure enough to close it. Meh, waste of time - next...'. You have to sell your Q as a good Q that deserves attention. – Martin James Jan 17 '18 at 20:41
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    @Chippe "if my theory is right". That one is a big if, but it's clear that I believe that these 2 million questions have more crap than anything else. Therefore I believe whatever would show in this tab (except recent good questions that haven't had time to have an answer, but I would say that if that tab is to help unanswered, it should only look at older questions) will be a cesspool of bad/off-topic/closable/deletable content. It's easy to see that if my theory is right (which again is why I prefaced my conclusion with an "if"), then that tab will be so bad, no one will want to use it. – Patrice Jan 18 '18 at 0:10
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    Btw again, for your point to make more sense to experienced users, I would use the same "unanswered" definition as Stack uses: non-accepted, non-upvoted. Whenever you focus on "non-accepted", to me it just means you are interested in the green checkmark, which most veterans see as pointless. I'd be way more interested in the other data – Patrice Jan 18 '18 at 0:11
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    @CHippe I'm not ignoring anything. I am telling you that I BELIEVE most of these 2 million questions are not worth it. What stats you have here don't change my belief. The fact these questions have been seen less than most doesn't mean anything in the context of me believing that most of these aren't worth this site. Whether they've been seen once, or a million times, if they are bad questions they are bad questions. Now I am more than open to being wrong on my theory. Which is why I preface most of my points with that belief & theory. Your stats aren't changing that stance on my end, is all. – Patrice Jan 18 '18 at 0:21
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TL;DR

The premise of your question is that really good questions aren't getting answered, and your numbers are really high. To me, that's a rather troubling claim, and one that I felt was worthy of additional attention.

So I took the time to look at your queries and try to understand what's going on. While it is certainly true that some decent questions slip through the cracks and don't get an answer, it would appear to be a far more exceptional case than your numbers suggest. Also, there are many tools already available to the question asker and the question seeker to find one another. A "recommended" tab looks to me like a noisy and potentially obnoxious solution to a rather rare problem that already has several solutions (including the ultimate pinnacle of solutions: a self-answer).


Breaking Down Those Numbers

Those numbers are pretty compelling, but they don't really stand up to close scrutiny.

First, as regards your 2 million... you are counting all questions that have 0 answers. This would include questions where the answer was given in a comment (which is pretty common... one of my own, for example), questions that were closed before an answer was offered, questions that were downvoted into oblivion and questions that were abandoned (no edits were ever made). If we filter those questions out, we get less than 180,000 (a reduction of more than 90%).

If we apply the same filter to some of your other numbers, they are reduced by about the same amount:

725,000 with less than 50 views becomes 72,000
1.5 million with less than 50 views and no accepted answer becomes 186,000

Stack Overflow automatically removes unanswered questions after a certain period of time, so it's probably more helpful to restrict our timeframe so that we understand these numbers. Let's look only at 2017:

72,000 with less than 50 views becomes 58,700

Putting Those Numbers in Context

Now, that still sounds like a pretty big number, so let's put that in context. We'll compare that number against all questions in 2017 that got at least one answer:

Answered questions with the same criteria (< 50 views, etc): 260,000
All answered questions: > 1.7 million

So, if we count all questions that were answered in 2017, the ratio of answered to "quietly ignored" (no answer, no comment, no edit, < 50 views) is about 30:1, or less than 3.5% (which, following the pattern, is an order of magnitude less than your claimed 40%).

If we are super generous and say that all of these questions were high caliber, then yeah... maybe you're on to something. 30:1 might be a troubling ratio. But we haven't actually established that yet. We've only established that for every 30 questions with an answer, there's going to be 1 question that doesn't get much immediate attention (sometimes answers arrive many, many months later). But why is that 1 question ignored?

Examining the Candidates Individually

I don't have time to comb through 58k questions, so I'm going to take a random-ish sample and give each of them the once-over. Of course, the relative quality of these questions is going to depend on the reader. My opinion will be different from others... but we are looking for really stellar questions that have been overlooked, questions that undeniably should have been answered and would be if only a few more people would have seen them.

  1. How to load all activerecord associations for Tire::Results::Collection

    The OP appears to already have a solution, and is just looking for a "more elegant way"

  2. what kind of result of Google API Pagespeedonline response?

    The OP wants to know how one of Google's tools is calculating the size of a request file. That's it. The OP doesn't share how this is relevant to anything he or she is working on. So... if you are a Google product engineer... now's your moment.

  3. Print Preview of HTML text is different to source (writing-mode setting)

    The OP answered their own question in the question body.

  4. Make component variables available trancluded HTML

    The OP is asking a very dense question, one which leaves me baffled. What does "transcluded" mean? More than that, this is a "tell me how to accomplish some very niche and extremely complicated thing" rather than a "here's a specific problem that can be answered in a reasonable amount of time", so no surprise no one wanted to take it on.

  5. How to avoid duplicates when storing new objects in a database?

    This should probably be closed as too broad... with extreme prejudice.

  6. How can I return the JSONArray response using the function below?

    Wall of code. These kinds of questions are difficult to penetrate... there's just too much code to sift through, and the end result is only going to be useful to the OP. Personally, I'd take one look and walk away.

  7. VB type Error with Graphics

    The OP messed up their build. This question isn't answerable without access to their source code. It should probably be closed, but no one even bothered to flag it (or not enough people flagged it, so the close votes expired).

  8. Why are different query plans generated for partial and full tsvector indices?

    This question is going to require a Postgres genius. It really digs deep into the bowels of the database, and the OP seems to have no motivation other than curiosity. Even if I were capable of answering the question, I probably wouldn't as the answer is almost certainly extremely long and heavy on theory. It'd be a rare soul that would consider this worth the effort.

So, of the 8 I've randomly selected, I see 4 that are either unanswerable or were answered by the OP (2, 3, 5, 7) and 2 that are poorly written (4, 6). Which leaves 2 questions (1, 8) that were decent, but are difficult to answer and the OP appears to have little urgency or need. So we'll be generous and say that the ratio of high quality to low quality unanswered questions is about 1:3, which changes our 30:1 ratio to 120:1, or about 0.8%, which is two orders of magnitude less than your 40%.

Final Analysis

So far, I'd say that Stack Overflow is actually doing extremely well at getting questions answered, or at least generating some activity on them. (Note that an "answer" doesn't mean that the OP was satisfied with the answer, but that's a very difficult metric to measure.)

That said, I could see some justification for a feature allowing users to find unanswered questions with low views that are, say, more than 6 months old. Except you can already do that.

The other piece to the puzzle... an AI that attempts to match you with a question you can answer, sounds fascinating, but it also sounds like one of those "AI is magic and can do anything" solutions. It might be more achievable and reasonable to let users create very specific filters so they can find exactly the kind of question that they want to answer.... which is also already possible

So while I agree that it's really annoying to write a question and not get any answers for a long time (believe me, I know), it seems like it's a relatively rare problem that already has a number of solutions. Forcing "recommended" questions into users faces doesn't guarantee that the answer rate will increase, and honestly I would find something like that annoying and just avoid it.


In regards to your Stack Overflow question (which was the original inspiration and justification for this feature request):

So what I'm asking is this, when you click the Export to Excel button, it checks all of the input tags in each row with the following name attributes: "skating", "shooting", "passing", "puck_control", and "team_play". If a certain row has between 1 & 4 of those radio buttons with the listed name attributes selected, a appears with the list of the data-id's (Or the unique title's I've added for each row; whichever is easier.) of the offending rows; if you click Okay it will download the Excel file, otherwise if you click Cancel it will remove the popup and then simply do nothing.

Wait, where's the question? You lead with "So what I'm asking is this", and then fail to actually ask anything.

I already have code for the first part of my question (var checkedItems = row.find(":checked:not(:radio[name='attendance'])") and checkedItems.length), so all you need to do is figure out how to collect a list of all the data-id's or title's that meet the listed criteria and add this info to a simple popup. I haven't been able to find anything that could help me with this so hopefully I can pick your brains to help solve this problem.

Nice to see that you already have code for this first part of your question... but if you already have a solution, then why is it in your question? (A question you've failed to actually ask so far.)

But here's the real issue with your "question":

so all you need to do is figure out how to collect a list of all the data-id's or title's that meet the listed criteria and add this info to a simple popup

It's not a question at all! It's acceptance criteria for a project! Maybe that's why no one is bothering to answer you. As nice as +25 rep might be, there are much more interesting and/or easy questions to answer, depending on the user's motivation.

Maybe if you removed all the unnecessary code (is the CSS really required?) and boiled this down to a more succinct question (that actually asks a question) you would get more answers. Also, "I haven't been able to find anything" is a pretty good giveaway that you probably haven't actually looked very hard. Getting HTML data-* attributes is pretty common and well documented, but the fact that you "haven't found anything" strongly suggests that you haven't tried anything.

  • I haven't tried anything? I've looked all over Stack Overflow for a question related to mine and I haven't found anything. Again, I don't know how to apply any of it. How would I be able to collect the data-id's or title's of a <tr> if they meet certain conditions? Anyways, I was using my own question as an example but if you want to substitute a better question go right ahead. Again, I added the CSS so it would be easier to visualize what I wanted done and to give you more code. I get I need a if/else statement but I don't know how to collect the data I need. – ChippeRockTheMurph Jan 17 '18 at 18:27
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    "How would I be able to collect the data-id's or title's of a <tr> if they meet certain conditions?" <-- There! Ask that question! – JDB Jan 17 '18 at 18:39
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    As to finding a better example... that's not my job, it's yours. You come bearing a proposal, so you need to show why your proposal is necessary. Personally, I don't think I could easily find a good example because I think they're exceptionally rare. Now go prove me wrong with a list of examples the length of your arm. – JDB Jan 17 '18 at 18:40
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    @ChippeRockTheMurph "I wanted done and to give you more code" That's exactly the problem. You should be providing a Minimal complete reproducible examples of your problem, not just including code for the sake of having more code. That dramatically lowers the quality of your question. – Servy Jan 17 '18 at 18:42
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Some point-by-point notes on your question and proposal:

I recently asked a question ... but yet, no answers. .... And this isn't a problem that's unique to me, there are nearly 2 million questions posted on Stack Overflow that don't receive any answers at all. And tons more than that don't have an accepted answer.

This is easy to explain in that 1) there are a lot more people asking questions then there are answering them, 2) many don't realize how important the first 20 to 30 minutes of a question's life is, that this is the time when the question will have the most views, and 3) most of the unanswered questions are in fact low-quality questions, as you yourself mention in your question:

Now granted, a lot of these questions might be not specific or too broad or have some other reason why they weren't answered, but if this is the case, then it should be flagged as such and let the user who posted the question to fix the question or delete it.

Which brings up another problem with the site: there are too many low-quality questions, and not enough folks willing to put in time to review questions, make comments, or to even up- or down-vote them. We are awash in questions, and need more help husbanding the site in an effort to improve quality and cull low-quality questions.

But most of them simply didn't have the right person view their question who could help solve their question.

Getting the "right person" is often solved by using appropriate and specific question tags. This is why tagging is so important -- it gets the proper expert's attention.

And sure, a lot of the users that posted an unanswered question on this site might be inactive nowadays

Yet another huge problem, that of "drive-by" questions, where the user posts a question and then ignores it. We see this day-in and day-out.

but this is a community and other people should be able to know the answer to their own question without having to ask the same question again.

I have no idea what point you're trying to make here

And while the Community ♦ moderator does offer bounties on random unanswered questions I feel like Stack Overflow should have an additional tab on the Questions page called Recommended. This tab will list a bunch of questions without an accepted answer that are ranked by the predicted user's ability to solve a certain question based on the tags they use in their own questions or based on the tags used in previous answers the user gave. If the question has been flagged it will not show up in this tab. The less answers on a question the higher the chance it will pop up on the user's Recommended tab. There should also be some kind of cap on the number of users that receive the same question in their Recommended tab; I suggest that the cap should be somewhat related the the number of views on a question.

OK, enough preamble, now we're entering the real meat of your suggestion -- You're suggesting a wholesale change in how questions are presented, essentially adding another queue for answerers to review. The problem though is not that there aren't enough questions for me or you to review and answer, there are already too many, and so you're suggesting increasing selective views based on

  1. Question tags that are relevant to the current user -- but understand that if I'm an expert in a certain specific area of programming, I'm already searching on those specific tags, so this will accomplish nothing new
  2. Lack of "flags" on the questions -- Not sure what you mean by "flag" but the question's rep is also already readily viewable.

But why bother? We already have a fine mechanism for questions like yours: give it a bounty. You might say, but the bounty costs you rep points, and I say "good", since this will limit bounty use to those who are already making positive contributions to this site.

If you really want to improve the number of questions answered and improve the quality of this site, then the solution is to answer them yourself, every day, and to spend time and effort culling through the questions on this site, making suggestions for improving questions, editing them for clarity, and up and down-voting questions and answers for quality. Don't add more work for others to do, and yes, I stand by my suggestion in comments that you need more experience in answering more questions, you've answered a total of 2, before making suggestions on how to improve the process. You only truly understand the difficulties involved in understanding someone else's problems and their code, and in how important MCVE program posts are, and clarity of problem expression when you've been in the trenches. So please, join us, answer, contribute, and together let's make this site better.


Regarding your edits:

... over 3 million without an accepted answer. In addition there are more than 725 thousand questions that have no answers and were viewed less than 50 times, that's almost 40% of all unanswered questions. There's also nearly 1.5 million questions without an accepted answer and were viewed less than 50 times.

Now tell me there isn't a problem.

No one is telling you that there "isn't a problem", but we are telling you (again) that there are a lot more questions asked than there are folks that are answering them or that are willing to moderate them. Re-jigging how folks see the question is not the solution, answering the questions and contributing to moderation is. Again, until you've been in the trenches answering questions, you won't have a horse in this race. Again, please join us, the water is fine.


TL;DR

Become a fully engaged question answerer first, if only to understand that side of the site, before making suggestions on how to improve it.

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    Unfortunately, as you know, the most frequent kind of 'site improvement' feature suggestions are 'some work needs to be done, so someone else needs to do it' :( – Martin James Jan 18 '18 at 0:25
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Why not call the new tab 'Lemmings'?

The legacy, unanswered questions get moved there and, after, say, a week of life there, they are deleted by the roomba.

This 'last chance' platform would allow the neglected questions one last chance and, if still unanswered, then they fall off the books.

Perhaps saving a lemming question could give an extra badge or a bit more rep than normal, but need to beware abusers, as normal:(

  • Well if were going to have a Lemmings tab we should probably somewhat restrict the amount of questions in that tab at any one time so that users can actually view all of the questions. There should also be some kind of restrictions based on the number of votes/views the question received. So that questions with 100k views don't get removed. – ChippeRockTheMurph Jan 17 '18 at 20:33
  • We still haven't actually established that there's a problem to be solved. Hypothetically there could be a problem, but no one has actually analyzed the data to prove it. In my opinion, the "Lemmings" tab is going to be 99.99% crap questions that have already been viewed and no one is interested in answering. But my opinion counts for squat... someone has to actually run some queries and prove it one way or the other. Since @Chippe cares the most, it's natural that Chippe should run those queries. Otherwise, this idea is DOA. – JDB Jan 17 '18 at 21:51
  • @JDB I'm sure you're right - there is no problem, well, not one of sufficient magnitude and import that it justifies the large amount of work that would be needed for ANY kind of additional tab. If it was decided by SO that a tab for unanswered questions WAS needed, then it should be used to vacuum up the legacy lemming-questions and, after a week or so in the limelight, shove 'em off a cliff. – Martin James Jan 17 '18 at 22:09
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    @MartinJames If you just want to get rid of old bad questions, you don't need to show them to people first, just start getting rid of old bad questions. The only reason to spend time working on an unanswered quesitons tab would be if you attempted to put the good unanswered questions that would be worth saving in there, so that people looking for unanswered questions to answer would be finding questions worth answering. – Servy Jan 17 '18 at 22:35
  • @JDB I've run the queries. Maybe you should change your mind about whether we have a problem or not. – ChippeRockTheMurph Jan 17 '18 at 22:43
  • @ChippeRockTheMurph - I've reviewed your queries and updated my answer. I readily acknowledge that some decent questions don't get answered, but I have not changed my mind that this is a relatively rare occurrence and that your proposal doesn't offer a compelling solution. – JDB Jan 18 '18 at 15:28

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