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This question already has an answer here:

I asked my first question ever on Stack Overflow and it got two downvotes in the first two milliseconds, so I deleted the question to not receive more downvotes. I was preparing for that question about a week, I have read help center page and "how-to-ask" page, and I also took a tour through this community and I read everything about what is allowed and what is not allowed on this website.

I spent three hours writing my question and preparing it very well, but still I cannot see what is wrong with my question. So, I am therefore asking here: Why has my question received a lot of bad score in such a short period of time?

On-topic

I strongly believe that my question is indeed on-topic, well-defined, clear and about programming.

My question is asking for debug help. There are thousands of questions asking "Why does this code work like this" or "Why does this code print that and not that", etc. Take a look at this question for example - it is a very good upvoted question, but it actually asks the same thing my question asks: "Why does this JavaScript code work like it does".

Comments

In comments a moderator said that I should use a debugger. But, I have already in my question mentioned that I indeed used debugger, but it didn't help very much. While debugging the script, I noticed much nonsense stuff and then... alert(12345) appeared out of nowhere. It actually took more than 12 thousand debugger steps to reach the very end of the script and really I still cannot see why that script works like it does.

Votes

I am not asking downvoters to retract their votes, but I am asking the rest of the community to explain why is that question downvoted. Is it off-topic? If yes, what exactly from the help-center page forbids such question? Is it unclear? If yes, which part exactly is unclear? Is it something else? If yes, what and why?

Here is the link to the question I am talking about (10K+ only, it is deleted).

Enter image description here

To avoid extended discussion in comments, here is a summary of my response.

I'm not a JavaScript coder, and so I can't criticize the programming content of your question, but I'm never usually fond of questions that ask for explanations of found code, as in my Java experience, they are best answered by debugging it and by studying (in depth) the appropriate tutorials. Again, I cannot comment regarding your code/question, but I've seen folks who have asked similar questions and who claim to have looked for a tutorial to explain something that does steps A-B-C when they should be looking for tutorials for each separate step.

There are a lot of questions asking about "Why does this code work like that", etc. It is really not always easy to debug code. Look at the one question I posted a link in this meta post. It has two upvotes, but I don't see why is that question better than mine. Or the one question linked from it, it has more than 20 upvotes, but it is asking the same thing "debug this code for me". Debugging is really not a trivial task, and today websites use a lot of advanced obfuscating techniques, making it very hard for developers to understand their strategy and how the code works.

Take a look at THIS question. It has 67 upvotes, but it didn't even talk about any attempt made from the OP. Why? Why has that question so many upvotes, while my question, full of attempts and explanations has -1? If it is not an injustice, then I don't know what is.

marked as duplicate by gnat, Stephen Rauch, Michael Gaskill, robinCTS, Pokechu22 Jan 14 '18 at 0:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 11
    Code deciphering questions like these are just a poor fit for Stack Overflow. In the end, all this is is "I have some code, tell me how it works". There's no indication of an attempt at deciphering it. You also assume ill intentions. The downvotes on here are probably because you decide to insult SO's users. – Cerbrus Jan 12 '18 at 23:45
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    You seem to tend to overreact in the comments. Insisting on statements such as "why are you downvoting me?" are actually not useful, especially when targeted towards another user. You can't know who downvoted your content, and you should not demand an explanation from downvoters. – E_net4 Jan 13 '18 at 0:26
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    It probably got downvoted because someone clicked the downvote arrow, and someone else clicked it too, and then someone else... that's how downvotes tend to happen. – Davy M Jan 13 '18 at 0:34
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    You throw around the term "injustice" but don't understand how this site works. There's been no injustice here, just disagreement. No one is required to leave an up or a down vote, or explain their voting. That's just how this site works, and asking for explanation (again) can have the opposite effect intended. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 13 '18 at 0:36
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    I would take votes as an indication that I may need to reconsider how I'm asking or answering a question. If someone is kind enough to leave a comment to tell why they voted the way that they did, I would consider it a kindness and would try to avoid arguing with them, but rather try to use the information to improve my question/answer. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 13 '18 at 0:40
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    I haven't finished reading all the comments, but you will delete your account for a +1, -2 question? REALLY?... that is an overreaction....That question actually GAVE you points.... -2 is not horrible.... It's not GREAT, but "horrible" definitely isn't -2 – Patrice Jan 13 '18 at 0:41
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    This place (as in Meta) is a fair place to ask why this happened. However, you will have to accept the possibility of disagreement with you. In particular, this meta question might have been downvoted because someone disagreed with your statements above. Not all of them were particularly nice towards the community. – E_net4 Jan 13 '18 at 0:41
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    I'm not a JavaScript coder, and so I can't criticize the programming content of your question, but I'm never usually fond of questions that ask for explanations of found code, as in my Java experience, they are best answered by debugging it and by studying (in depth) the appropriate tutorials. Again, I cannot comment regarding your code/question, but I've seen folks who have asked similar questions and who claim to have looked for a tutorial to explain something that does steps A-B-C when they should be looking for tutorials for each separate step. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 13 '18 at 0:44
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    For the love of Pete, it is 2 down-votes.... 2. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 13 '18 at 0:45
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    @Hovercraft yeah... while I agree deletion for -2 + 1 is a bit much, I don't believe saying something like that is helpful to anything... it's poking free fun at a user with no benefit. – Patrice Jan 13 '18 at 0:46
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    @9098 however, even if we forget the free fun poked at you, the intent is still there. it's 2 downvotes.... the question is still getting you net + point.... don't you think throwing EVERYTHING out for those two votes isn't you getting aggravated and throwing the baby with the bathwater here? – Patrice Jan 13 '18 at 0:47
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    That other question you linked is rather old. The rules were different back then. – Cerbrus Jan 13 '18 at 8:48
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    @9098conadygawu 'Are you aware that you should represent elite on this website, high-rep users should take care of their speech tone' WHY? Why is it acceptable for OP's to be snarky, rude, abusive etc, but not 'high-rep users'? The skilled and experienced developers who answer many questions on SO are constantly subjected to a tsunami of abusive questions, eg. those that think they can get away with works requests and code dumps. Those users know they can be as abusive as they like,since they can just delete their account and open a new one if the drones don't do their homework as ordered:( – Martin James Jan 13 '18 at 17:50
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    Morever now we'll never know how they do that alert() thing... – TGrif Jan 13 '18 at 18:53
19

'first two miliseconds' don't know about that, but I was fairly sure you question was going to be bad after ~500ms.

OK, how it works from the perspective of an experienced SO user. This may be incorrect, but it's how I think when I read your Q:

'I dont know much about javaScript'

Right, by this stage, I'm 99% sure that your question will be getting a downvote and/or close-vote. It reads like: 'Here's my shield: 'My question is bad, but don't treat me badly because I'm a newbie'

....gets ready on downvote button....

I found this code as a part of some game engine code

I'm now 99.9% sure that your question will be getting a downvote and/or close-vote. It's not your code, and there may be a copyright issue. Assuming there is not, it's likely to be some over-optimized crap that needs a lot of work to take apart and understand, and you would prefer someone else did it. This is gonna be 'Too broad' if not 'Unclear'.

First line of question and it's already over...

....gets ready on close-vote button....

Reads rest of question....

Sure enough, it's a load of obfuscated crap that someone shoveled onto the net. OP wants someone else to work out how it works. It's going be of next-to-no use to future SO users/visitors. OP has shown no evidence of investigation/debug.

'so I am assuming each downvote should correspond to at least one comment' nah, the skilled and experienced developers who answer good questions on SO have little time to waste on explaining why bad questions are bad.

Vote-begging, implication of one-question-per account: 'I will delete this account soon, but I am asking for explanation why he didnt leave upvote'

Down and close vote for sure.

As it happens, other users got there first, so I didn't have to vote on anything except this meta:

Debugging is really not a trivial task, today websites use a lot of advanced obfuscating techniques, making it very hard for developers to understand their strategy and how code works.

Debugging, logging, tracing? No thanks, it's hard work, so I'll get somebody else to do it. I dont know much about JavaScript and I'm unwilling to put in effort on my own problems and so learn more.

Downvote on meta too:(

  • I'm not sure how to react to this... – E_net4 Jan 13 '18 at 13:49
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    @E_net4 send money? (worth a try:) – Martin James Jan 13 '18 at 14:47
15

"De-obfuscate code for me" is not useful for future visitors and hence deserves downvotes and close votes.

Additionally, the post shows no indication of actual debugging - stepping through the code in the debugger (presumably you have real browser like Firefox/Chrome/Internet Explorer/Edge somewhere... if you are stuck with just Safari... you may search for console debugger for JavaScript) which asks for more downvotes.

Please note that there is no way to know what you did to investigate the problem without actual information in the post.

For example, I'd expect at very least a value that is passed to the first eval to be shown,

 var _='[~[(pmqwt{n{|}|{t}....

or even better result of that eval before the second one:

 "[][(![]+[])[+[]]+([![]]+ ..... []+[+[]]])()"

This way one would instantly recognize what is going on and suggest search terms like https://www.bing.com/search?q=javascript+square+bracket+obfuscation or duplicate.

Now at that point you are expected to start ... complaining that duplicates are not friendly - but that is another duplicate :).

  • 1
    Why THIS question has so many upvotes? What is happening there? What it has that my question doesn't have? – user9211067 Jan 13 '18 at 1:00
  • Im still waiting for your explanation. If asking for debug help is off-topic, why the linked question has so many upvotes? – user9211067 Jan 13 '18 at 1:02
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    @9098conadygawu the othe question is 3 years old, times change. – Robert Longson Jan 13 '18 at 8:46
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    @RobertLongson considering the total votes, I think it got into the HNQ instead... (and that question also got shared to many external sites) – Andrew T. Jan 13 '18 at 14:08