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I am reading the blog post on "The Brutal Lifecycle of JavaScript Frameworks", which also presents an "Industry" section.

Ian explains that they use Maxmind to match IP address to companies. However, as far as I can tell Maxmind don't provide info about the industry of matched companies.

Where do the team gather such data from?

To clarify: I'm not talking about geography, which is discussed in the following section. In the "Industry" section, data is aggragated by industry (Academic, Energy, Consulting, Media, Retail, ...), and Ian clearly states that

The choice of JavaScript framework also varies by industry, which we can segment for US traffic by matching IP address to companies

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    The choice of JavaScript framework also varies by industry, which we can segment for US traffic by matching IP address to companies. They're saying they use Maxmind to match IP address to locations and they limit the data to the US. They don't go to Maxmind to get data about the industry, just the location. – George Jan 12 '18 at 15:41
  • @George they actually aggreagate data by industry (Academic, Energy, Consulting, Media, Retail, ...) – Mario Trucco Jan 12 '18 at 15:43
  • They're not getting the "industry" from an IP address. They can probably deduce it from user profiles. – Cerbrus Jan 12 '18 at 15:44
  • @Cerbrus Then why does Ian say "The choice of JavaScript framework also varies by industry, which we can segment for US traffic by matching IP address to companies"? – Mario Trucco Jan 12 '18 at 15:46
  • I think "companies" there refers to ISPs: They're only using IP addresses from US ISPs – Cerbrus Jan 12 '18 at 15:48
  • @Cerbrus Sorry, I don't understand... the wording in the blog clearly states that they use IP matching to segment US traffic by industry – Mario Trucco Jan 12 '18 at 15:51
  • "which we can segment for US traffic by matching IP address to companies" > I read "Segment for US traffic" as "determine what is and isn't US traffic". – Cerbrus Jan 12 '18 at 15:52
  • @Cerbrus Now I see what you mean. However, I don't think that's the intended meaning. The section discusses "What industries tended to use each of these frameworks", and the graph shows data aggragtions by industry (Academic, Energy, Consulting, Media, Retail, ...). "segment for US" means, in my opinion, that they get companies info only for US companies. I might be wrong, though – Mario Trucco Jan 12 '18 at 15:56
  • Maybe, maybe not. A employee could probably answer that. – Cerbrus Jan 12 '18 at 15:57
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The IP address of a visitor can be matched to an "Organization name" through the Maxmind database. Almost all US traffic (>99%) can be matched to an organization.

We find lots of unique organizations that visit Stack Overflow, but there is a long tail to the distribution where most organizations have very little traffic; just a couple hundred organizations make up 90% of our traffic. The majority of US (and indeed, worldwide) traffic can be matched only to the internet company that serves it, such as "Comcast Cable" or "Verizon Fios". These don't help us discover the company a visitor works at. However, larger companies and institutions, such as universities or government agencies, are more likely to own their own ISPs. We use regexes and manual annotation to build a strategy for matching organization name to industry; we estimate that we can recognize the industry of about a quarter of our traffic, biased to organizations that own their own ISPs. For example, Stack Overflow is a small company that doesn't own an ISP so we couldn't recognize our own traffic with this method.

The method we use here has a low rate of false positives but a high rate of false negatives. It's similar to the approach to find student traffic described in this blog post.

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    Even large organisations are unlikely to own their ISPs. They may own IP addresses or an IP address may be dedicated fully to an organisation by its ISP and the organisation can be identified through such registration data. – Shadow Jan 15 '18 at 1:45

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