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I just got into my first edit war. After receiving a suitable moderator scolding in response (and being explicitly instructed to take it to Meta), I'd like Meta's help in resolving it.

Creating a new DOM element from an HTML string using built-in DOM methods or prototype is a question from 2009. Back in 2009, Crescent Fresh posted an answer containing two solutions: one which used Prototype.js, and another that used a trick involving setting the .innerHTML property of a div. The full text of that answer, as it was at the end of 2017, is as follows:

Should be obvious, but the link to that MSDN article is regarding an IE only feature.

Generally the following cross-browser trick is what all the libraries do to get DOM elements from an HTML string (with some extra work for IE for <td>s, <tr>s, <thead>s, <select>s and more):

var s = '<li>text</li>'; // HTML string

var div = document.createElement('div');
div.innerHTML = s;
var elements = div.childNodes;

Or var element = div.firstChild if you know you're getting a single root node.

I would recommend you stick to the library-approved method of creating elements from HTML strings though. Prototype has this feature built-into its update() method.

This answer is currently accepted and the highest upvoted answer on the question. This solution is slightly flawed, and has been since the time that it was written, since the div technique doesn't work if you're trying to parse HTML that is illegal as the descendent of a div, such as a td element. (Or at least it doesn't reliably work - the details will depend upon browsers' handling of illegal HTML and for all I know it might work for some elements that are illegal as the child of a div; you'd need to ask somebody with more knowledge of HTML than me. But at least, it doesn't work for tds.) Additionally, the answer is slightly flawed in that it doesn't note this drawback.

In 2016, I posted an answer noting that the template element, included in HTML 5, allows you to perform roughly the same trick but without the drawback of failing on tds, since a template can legally have any elements as children. I also noted that browser support for template is incomplete. Note that this means that Crescent Fresh's answer is not yet completely obsolete - you might well want to favour it over mine for browser compatibility reasons.

On December 21st, I edited the question with the goal of making it more concise. Unfortunately, in doing so I removed the MSDN link from it that was being referenced by Crescent Fresh's answer, rendering the first paragraph of his answer nonsensical. My bad; I messed up. Sorry about that.

Yesterday at 16:00 UTC, the first salvo of the edit war is fired, with mikemaccana making a pair of edits that left Crescent Fresh's answer in the following state:

To get DOM elements from an HTML string:

var createElementFromHTML = function(tagString){
  var div = document.createElement('div');
  div.innerHTML = tagString.trim();
  return div.childNodes[0];
}

Assuming tagString contains a single parent tag.

There are, in my view, a lot of things wrong with this edit. I rolled it back (taking the opportunity to remove the paragraph I'd rendered incoherent in December while I was at it), and explained why in a comment:

@mikemaccana, your edit removed multiple bits of information from the question: the solution with Prototype; how to do this for a single vs multiple nodes; that this solution is (or rather was) used in popular libraries; and that supporting old IE versions requires some additional work. Even leaving aside that this answer is (and always was) flawed, and that I'd recommend modern readers use mine instead, I don't see any good reason for deleting all of that info, and have accordingly rolled back your edit.

Mike responds:

@MarkAmery My edit fixed the minified code, added a wrapper functions, removed the outdated information regarding versions of IE no longer in popular use, and removed the prototype.js info, as prototype is no longer popular. Thanks for letting me know you rolled it back. I'll make the same fixes again and leave in the information about ancient versions of IE for (both) developers who love IE8 and (all three) developers who love prototype.js in 2018,, not for the benefit of readers, but simply to keep you happy.

(Note that I presume the minified code being referred to is the string named s in the original version of Crescent's post; all other variables had full English names.)

Upon reading this, I thought we'd come to a compromise, albeit not an entirely amicable one. I voiced my assent:

@mikemaccana "Minified code" seems like a slightly hyperbolic way of saying "most variables have full English names, but there's also a string named s", but sure - I've got no objection to renaming that to htmlString.

Unfortunately, this was not where the story ended. Mike's next series of edits left the post as follows:

Using HTML templates (for current browsers - alas no node/JSDOM support at the time of writing):

var createElementFromHTML = function(tagString) {
  var template = document.createElement('template');
  template.innerHTML = html;
  return template.content.cloneNode(true);
}

Using innerHTML (for older browsers and node, but may have issues with some elements - see discussion in other answers:

var createElementFromHTML = function(tagString){
  var div = document.createElement('div');
  div.innerHTML = tagString.trim();
  // You can change this to div.childNodes if you need to handle multiple root elements in your string.
  return div.firstChild; 
}

Note: if you are still developing for Internet Explorer in 2018, and target versions of IE more than a decade old: (there is with some extra work to handle bugs in IE 8 and earlier for <td>s, <tr>s, <thead>s, <select>s and other elements).

Note: if you happen to use prototype.js in 2018, prototype has this feature built-into its update() method.

This is a highly flawed attempt at an answer. I noted some of the problems in a comment (though I hadn't seen them all yet), accompanied by a second rollback:

@mikemaccana I've rolled back your edit again, for several reasons: the function at the top was broken in two ways (missing trim() and a variable name error), there were a bunch of English errors, the snark about old browsers and libraries was entirely gratuitous, it invalidated a bunch of comments, and more fundamentally it transformed the post into a totally different answer than the one that Crescent Fresh originally posted; I don't think that hijacking an accepted answer to post an entirely different solution is a legit use of editing powers. If you disagree, we can take it to Meta.

Mike didn't share my point of view, and commented to say so. At this point in the exchange, he stopped @-notifying me, so that I had to manually drop in on the question to see if any changes had been made.

Mark: I added '.trim()` to the answer to handle TemplateStrings. Indeed, I forgot to add it to the second answer: perhaps you should have suggested that as a constructive way of giving feedback rather than revert the answer to it's nine year old state. I don't think there was any snark, but the comments only existed because you personally insisted IE8 and prototype.js be left in an answer in 2018. I've undone the vandalism: if you believe that maintaining old answers should be forbidden on StackOverflow, take it to meta yourself.

I voiced some anger:

@mikemaccana Seriously, your response to a rollback in which I @-notified you with a detailed explanation of my reasoning and invited further discussion is to reapply your edit without notifying me? I've mod-flagged. And yes, I think that on a question tagged with prototypejs and which explicitly asks about answers using Prototype, the prototype solution shouldn't be scrubbed from the accepted answer. "Maintaining" an answer and replacing it wholesale with a different answer via an edit are not the same thing.

I'll admit that this complaint about radical edits is a tad hypocritical. I've made some seriously radical edits before that absolutely violated both the letter and spirit of many of the editing guidelines established on Meta because I thought they ultimately helped future readers, rules be damned; as such, I probably shouldn't be throwing stones inside my glass house. But my frustration here came from the fact that the main change being made to Crescent's answer was, effectively, to tack on (an inferior version of) my answer, when my answer was already posted and a user dissatisfied with Crescent's could just scroll down to it.

I listed, over the course of 3 comments, the errors in Mike's answer, and my reasons for objecting to his edit. Those comments can now be read in chat. Then I retracted my mod flag, because I thought I saw a path forward that would leave us both happy:

@mikemaccana Hmm. I've cooled my head and retracted my mod flag, because I think we can still probably find a final form for this answer that will satisfy us both. I sympathise with wanting the top answer on the Q to not mislead people; I just don't think that basically duplicating my solution into there is the right way, especially when this post still has upsides over mine (compatibility with older browsers). Unless you object and would rather take this to Meta/mods, after work I'll tweak the answer to note explicitly that (unlike some other approaches) this won't work for some elements, like tds, but that it has the advantage of decent support for old browsers. I'll keep all the information - about this (once) being a technique used in library internals, about the Prototype solution, and about the extra work needed to support IE. And then new readers can see up front that this has downsides, and if they want a template-based solution, scroll down to mine. Does that seem reasonable to you?

Mike wasn't having it. Again, without @-notifying me, he replied:

Mark: I've already kept the info about prototype, and old IE, and tds, so I don't understand what work you would be doing by modifying the answer again. I updated the answer with the template as that should be preferable, including a link to the official docs with proper link text (unlike your own answer) as that's a reasonable update to a question whose answer has changed. I suggest that the issue is not updating old answers with new info, but a personal one as you have one of the other answers, albeit with less information. So short answer: no. Please don't remove any further work.

Mark: I see you've ignored your own promise not to vandalise further unless asked. I've reverted the changes again. Please stop vandalising answers and file a meta issue if you dislike updates to decade old answers.

Here's the latest attempt at a revision from him:

Using HTML templates (for current browsers - alas no node/JSDOM support at the time of writing):

var createElementFromHTML = function(tagString) {
  var template = document.createElement('template');
  template.innerHTML = tagString.trim();
  return template.content.cloneNode(true);
}

Using innerHTML (for older browsers and node, but may have issues with some elements - see discussion in other answers:

var createElementFromHTML = function(tagString){
  var div = document.createElement('div');
  div.innerHTML = tagString.trim();
  // You can change this to div.childNodes if you need to handle multiple root elements in your string.
  return div.firstChild; 
}

Note: if you are still developing for Internet Explorer in 2018, and target versions of IE more than a decade old: (there is with some extra work to handle bugs in IE 8 and earlier for <td>s, <tr>s, <thead>s, <select>s and other elements).

Note: if you happen to use prototype.js in 2018, prototype has this feature built-into its update() method.

Most of the issues that I pointed out in his previous revision remain unfixed. There are a slew of both minor English errors, stylistic issues, and significant technical errors, which I'll enumerate:

  1. "Node" should be capitalised
  2. "jsdom" should be all lowercase (see the stylisation in their official docs)
  3. The first createElementFromHTML in fact returns a DocumentFragment, not an element. This is important because it means that the returned value won't have the properties that you'd expect it to have if it were an element - for instance, the result of createElementFromHTML('<input>') will have no value property.
  4. The cloneNode(true) call is unnecessary (since the function's local scope holds the only reference to the DocumentFragment being cloned) and probably incurs an avoidable (albeit unimportant) performance penalty.
  5. The paragraph between the two code blocks wrongly and confusingly implies that the first code block doesn't use innerHTML, when in fact it does.
  6. There's an unclosed left parenthesis in that same paragraph.
  7. Although the second code block includes a comment suggesting how to tweak the function to handle a HTML string made up of multiple elements, the first does not.
  8. The answer wrongly claims that its IE-specific errors only apply to IE 8 and below, when according to comments on the answer they in fact apply up to at least IE 10. (I haven't confirmed.)
  9. The explicit references to 2018 are gonna look pretty silly in 2019 (and come across kind of snarky).

Point 3 in particular is a real showstopper - and I'd pointed it out, explicitly, in the comments, along with several of the other errors here. Despite having had these errors explicitly pointed out to him, Mike just went ahead and reintroduced his edit anyway, knowingly restoring broken content to the post - which it seems to me is, at best, pretty damn sloppy. I rolled back, and then Martijn Pieters arrived on the scene and told us both to knock it off and take it to Meta. So here I am.

In my ideal world, I'd like Crescent Fresh's answer to be modified to read something like this (linking to my answer, as mine links to his):

The following cross-browser trick is what all the libraries used to do to get DOM elements from an HTML string (with some extra work for IE to work around bugs with its implementation of innerHTML):

var s = '<li>text</li>'; // HTML string

var div = document.createElement('div');
div.innerHTML = s;
var elements = div.childNodes;

Or var element = div.firstChild if you know you're getting a single root node.

Note that this won't work for some elements that cannot legally be children of a div, such as tds. However, you might nonetheless prefer this approach over [similar approaches with a template](link to my answer) because it will work in older browsers that do not support the template element.

I would recommend you stick to the library-approved method of creating elements from HTML strings though. Prototype has this feature built-into its update() method.

In my view, this would serve readers best - they would have two separate approaches they could vote on separately, the drawbacks of Crescent's approach would be clearly spelt out in his answer, and anyone wanting to use the template-based approach would get to read about it in my more detailed answer that includes spec links, details about the types and properties involved, and stats from Can I use... about browser support - all useful detail to have before deciding to use the answer - rather than just an unexplained function.

I guess I have several questions:

  1. What final form should Crescent Fresh's answer end up in? Should the template-based solution just be lifted from my answer and added to his older one (with the various issues present in mikemaccana's versions fixed), or is that inappropriate? Is my proposal above a good one?

  2. How should I have handled this differently? I've definitely voiced some anger and assumed some bad faith that I oughtn't've over the course of the conversation, but there are other questions here. Martijn Pieters is of the view that I should've escalated to the mods at or before the second rollback - at a point when dialog was still ongoing and it still seemed to me like Mike and I might reach an agreement. Does it really make sense to escalate to mods - and Meta - in such circumstances?

    I've spent 2 hours writing this post, and frankly I'm a bit angry about having to spend my time on it. More man-hours will be spent reading it. In circumstances outside of rollback wars, we're told that moderators are exception handlers, not to be used in scenarios where we have the power to handle problems ourselves. Isn't this incompatible with escalating rollback wars to mods while dialogue is still ongoing? And am I really meant to burn an hour or hours of my life putting a case to Meta every time I disagree with someone about how a post should look, even when I might still be able to solve it through conversation in the comments with a fraction of the effort?

  3. Leaving aside going to the mods, isn't publicising this sort of dispute on Meta problematic? I did it because Martijn asked me to, and I don't have any other recourse left, but I'm not comfortable with it. I'm basically publicly calling out a user, by name, for making technically incorrect edits to a post after being explicitly informed that the edits contained errors - something which, assuming good faith as far as is possible, indicates some pretty rushed and reckless editing borne out of impatience and frustration at me. Aren't these kind of personal slap-fights meant to be the mods' business, not Meta's?

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    Can you post a TL;DR synopsis? – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 12 '18 at 0:00
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    @HovercraftFullOfEels I'd love to, but there's a lot of very different questions here to untangle. – Mark Amery Jan 12 '18 at 0:02
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    Then this question may be above most of our pay grades. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 12 '18 at 0:04
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    @HovercraftFullOfEels I wish I disagreed with you. Posting here about this at all was not my first choice, and not how I wanted to spend my Thursday evening. – Mark Amery Jan 12 '18 at 0:11
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    Does it really make sense to escalate to mods - and Meta - in such circumstances? Yes because 1) a mod said this is a situation where they want you to do so and 2) this is probably easier to deal with before there's been a ton of edits & rollbacks and before people get angry. – BSMP Jan 12 '18 at 0:28
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    @BSMP I've had several disagreements over the years with other users about edits. Sometimes they've been resolved with comments, or in chat. More than once I've realised after some back and forth - even after the conversation got tense - that I'm wholly or partly in the wrong, and we've found a final outcome we were both happy with. Never have things ended up like this. I don't see why I should've burned hours of my life - and hours of other people's. - on those cases that were ultimately resolved entirely amicably. – Mark Amery Jan 12 '18 at 0:46
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    I stopped reading halfway through and agree that it is an unnecessarily large mess. – user4639281 Jan 12 '18 at 3:02
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    I for one am very thankful that this has been posted. You clearly care about that post and about finding a compromise. That alone is worth your and our time. Meta is a far better platform to work out a resolution than are comments and rollbacks. So thank you! – Martijn Pieters Jan 12 '18 at 8:24
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    @TinyGiant don't worry, we'll have some mandatory comments on down votes posts for you shortly ... – rene Jan 12 '18 at 8:33
  • "I just got into my first edit war." -- Something tells me it won't be your last. – Mark Benningfield Jan 12 '18 at 11:42
  • @MarkAmery, your "ideal world" edit proposal captures much of the back-and-forth answer edits that occurred, and it incorporates one of Mike's concerns by referencing yours (rather than replacing mine). I consider it a "collaborative edit" :) I will edit my answer but will hold off for a day or so in case Mike chimes in. – Crescent Fresh Jan 12 '18 at 17:43
  • I've gone ahead and made my proposed edit; let's see if Mike wants to weigh in further. – Mark Amery Jan 14 '18 at 14:07
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When will people learn not to completely replace other people's non-wiki answers just because they've collected upvotes for long enough that they're unlikely to get dethroned by new answers for several years?

Yes, collaborative editing is one of our pillars, but there's a reason we advise against non-wiki edits that change the meaning of a post, and there's a reason the "community wiki" option exists.

Yes, answers that have collected upvotes for long enough that they're unlikely to get dethroned by new answers for several years is a real problem. But not everyone is comfortable taking credit for other people's painstaking edits that ought to be answers in their own right, and not everyone is happy to kick back and rake in the upvotes knowing that their answers are no longer helping anybody and are in fact incorrect:

My 9 year old answer is getting updates from the community as recently as today, and complaints that "it doesn't work". People, please stop. Just use this answer as the way forward. A 9 year old answer to anything browser related is simply irrelevant. – Crescent Fresh yesterday

If nothing else, that tells me what Crescent Fresh wants most is their answer gone in favour of yours (which, thankfully, is the next highest-scoring answer). Not edited, but gone. I think it's abundantly clear (at least to me with domain knowledge) that not much value is going to be lost with that answer gone, so I'm more than happy to help with that, if they just say the word. We got lucky1 that the author of the original answer was around to weigh in and they're happy to just defer to a more up-to-date answer.

That's your answer to #1. The reason you were told to bring this to meta is likely because Martijn thinks (and I agree) that it's unlikely you'd come to an agreement over there given how long this has dragged out. I've wasted a lot of time writing lengthy meta rants of my own (some of which have never seen the light of day), so I feel your frustration big time. But when you care enough about the integrity of the site, the other option (walking away and pretending this isn't a problem) just seems even worse.

Is publicising this sort of dispute on meta problematic? Yeah, maybe, but not necessarily. This is when, IMHO, the ability of everyone involved to remain civil and professional in conflict resolution is put to the test. I think your post here is fine. Nothing wrong with being angry. When the situation gets complicated enough that it becomes more than just a slap-fight, sometimes you have to name names and cite content in order to explain your case. That's okay, as long as you do your best to present the facts objectively and avoid personal attacks. Meta is a place to hash things out at length. It was made for conflict resolution. I don't think I would've fancied squeezing everything I've now said in a series of comments that'll potentially get fragmented by comment votes.


1 Or unlucky, if you see this as having painstakingly taken all the time to write this only for the resolution to simply be to delete Crescent Fresh's answer entirely.

  • I made that remark before any discussion that followed, and I simply meant "this answer should be the accepted answer" (and not mine). – Crescent Fresh Jan 12 '18 at 21:18
  • @Crescent Fresh: Yeah, we should probably ask the asker to change the accepted answer. (I'm only suggesting this now because so few askers do that I previously assumed it simply wasn't going to be an option - which is why I recommended deleting your answer, since that was the only other "don't edit" option.) – BoltClock Jan 13 '18 at 6:07
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    What's especially confusing is that the practice in the first sentence of your answer is an allowed and accepted practice on meta sites, since the goal there is to give out correct information. – gparyani Jan 14 '18 at 22:11
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Some quick extra commentary before I start my workday:

I stopped reading halfway through and agree that it is an unnecessarily large mess. – Tiny Giant 6 hours ago

Yeah, I agree. There were essentially several things I was "asking" here:

  • Was completely altering the spirit of this arguably-obsolete accepted answer the right thing to do? When are such edits acceptable?
  • What should we ultimately do about this arguably-obsolete accepted answer? Is this proposed edit of mine a good idea?
  • Shouldn't escalating to mods over editing disputes be an absolute last resort?
  • Waaah! This situation upsets me!

The first three of those should've been broken into a series of smaller, more digestible meta posts, in the same style as I've done before. The last should've stayed between me and my proverbial therapist. But since we're here, some comments on BoltClock's answer:

When will people learn not to completely replace other people's non-wiki answers just because they've collected upvotes for long enough that they're unlikely to get dethroned by new answers for several years?

Yes, collaborative editing is one of our pillars, but there's a reason we advise against non-wiki edits that change the meaning of a post, and there's a reason the "community wiki" option exists.

Personally, I'm not completely adverse to people breaking the editing rules for the greater good. I've done some officially Very Naughty things myself, including totally commandeering a user's answer as my own soapbox because the question was closed so I couldn't post my own and conspiring with the mods to radically change a question in a way that invalidated legitimate, highly-upvoted answers and then delete those answers. I just strongly disagree that the edits helped in this particular case - and agree with BoltClock that "the accepted answer is bad" should not in itself be seen as a license to edit the accepted answer into whatever you wish it to be.

what Crescent Fresh wants most is their answer gone in favour of yours (which, thankfully, is the next highest-scoring answer). Not edited, but gone. I think it's abundantly clear (at least to me with domain knowledge) that not much value is going to be lost with that answer gone, so I'm more than happy to help with that, if they just say the word.

A significant difference of opinion here is that - unlike BoltClock and Crescent Fresh - I don't think that Crescent Fresh's answer is worthless and should be deleted. Yeah, it has an error in it (it wrongly implies that it works for creating td's in non-IE browsers when in fact it doesn't) and would probably benefit from that error being fixed, but the core answer is actually superior to mine for the subset of people who need to support old browsers; as my answer notes, my solution is still only supported by 90% of users' browsers globally as of January 2018. Not everybody is working on the sort of project where it's even remotely acceptable for 10% of the world not to be able to use your site.

Additionally, my answer is written on the assumption that its core audience is people who have already read Crescent Fresh's answer and then scrolled down, and actually directly references Crescent's answer with a link. It wouldn't be completely invalidated if Crescent's answer were to be deleted, but I'd be uncomfortable if it were to become the top answer on the page in its current form; I think that it's valuable to have, high up on the page:

  • A recommendation to let a library do this for you if possible - complete with whatever mysterious browser compatibility hacks it has under the hood - rather than rolling your own hack
  • A solution that will work for people who need to support old browsers

If Crescent's answer were to be deleted, I'd probably end up editing my answer to basically tack on a rewritten version of his one as an alternative solution, which would be pretty damn ironic given how we got here.

What I would be comfortable with - and would require a smaller modification to my answer - would be Crescent's answer remaining but Omer, the question asker, marking mine as accepted to haul it to the top of the list. That requires Omer's co-operation, though.

Finally, I'd suggest holding off on taking any action for at least 24 hours or so to let Mike weigh in if he wants to. I think a large part of what ratcheted up the anger on both sides here was that we were both feeling a need to take action immediately in response to each others' unwanted interruptions in the middle of our work. Locking the post and taking things to Meta should be a mechanism for removing the urgency from these situations - which it fails to be if you go ahead and take a drastic action before one of the parties gets a chance to get their say.

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    It seems to me that Crescent Fresh just wants out of this whole mess - after all, it's their answer that's being disputed, and even if we disassociate it it's still going to be disputed, to seemingly no end. On the other hand, it's probably worth citing their solution in yours, because yours is quite substantially different to theirs, and at least you're more amenable to that idea. (Unless the other editor starts going after your answer afterwards...) – BoltClock Jan 12 '18 at 10:18
  • Like you, I prefer the OP to mark your answer as accepted. – Crescent Fresh Jan 12 '18 at 17:43
  • @pnuts I think you're reading too literally; I've never seen that passage from the Help Center construed to forbid question askers from selecting an accepted answer on the basis of what they think will be most useful to the rest of the community, or from updating their choice of accepted answer years after the question was asked - and indeed both of those things happen on the site all the time. Rather, I think the only reason it's there is to emphasize that the choice of what answer to accept is entirely the asker's, and that we shouldn't harass askers about choosing "incorrectly". – Mark Amery Jan 13 '18 at 21:01
  • @pnuts To your final question - yes, absolutely. To the rest of your comment, I disagree; I don't view politely suggesting to an OP that they change their accepted answer choice when an answer has become obsolete as wrong. I wouldn't characterize it as a step in the direction of harassment except in the same trivial sense that buying an axe is a step in the direction of being an axe murderer; I don't think it's a problematic or worrying act in itself. – Mark Amery Jan 13 '18 at 21:14
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    "there is no need, no gain and no reason to move the tick" - in this case, where I think that Crescent's answer is about as useful as mine, I actually agree with you. I disagree in other cases where an accepted answer truly is outright inferior to a later answer on a popular question; in those cases, shifting the better answer to the top is valuable since it saves readers' time. Even if it only takes a minute per reader to wade through an inferior answer, that multiplies up to an entire man-year of programmers' lives wasted over the course of 100000 views. – Mark Amery Jan 13 '18 at 21:28

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