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So... you're browsing through the newest questions on your favourite topic. Naturally, being the helpful sort you are, you're often more likely to investigate a question that doesn't already have an answer, particularly if your time is limited.

Unfortunately some answers are so eye-wateringly wrong you feel that, as an OP, your CPU is about to pop out of it's mobo e.g. this one to my recent question. Given the tenancy, particularly on topics with a smaller user base for already 'answered' questions to go overlooked what can an OP do to 'rescue' their question, especially when it's already a well written mvce?

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    "Naturally, being the helpful sort you are, you're often more likely to investigate a question that doesn't already have an answer, particularly if your time is limited." Not if you're the type of person that realizes that it's very common for a question to have a bad answer, and therefore be unanswered, and if there is a good answer there, then you can provide your own feedback on those existing answers, helping others with the same problem more effectively evaluate them, and if necessary, providing information to help the author's improve them. – Servy Jan 8 '18 at 22:33
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    Well, when users can't understand the difference between "question has an answer" and "question has been answered" (i.e. OP also accepted the answer and such questions are displayed differently), then how much useful content can they provide anyway? – Tom Jan 8 '18 at 22:34
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    @Tom Lots of people are subject matter experts in a given topic, and are capable of providing great answers to question in their areas of expertise, but aren't sufficiently experienced in using the site as to know what the background color of a post's score means. – Servy Jan 8 '18 at 22:37
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    I often answer questions that already have multiple answers due to the fact that the existing answers are wrong, are missing some important detail, lack any kind of explanation, or are technically correct but just a horrible idea. There are a lot of people answering programming questions that don't have a grasp on the technology (or programming in general for that matter). I rarely consider the number of answers on a question already before clicking the link to the question. – user4639281 Jan 8 '18 at 22:41
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    "Whimsical update: -2 rep within seconds of posting this question" Your question was at 0 when I posted my comment, which was several minutes after you posted your question. People are not obligated to explain their votes to you. If they want to, they can, if they don't, that's fine to. Additionally, your question should be where you ask your question, not where you provide off topic meta commentary on your question. – Servy Jan 8 '18 at 22:47
  • @Servy I was trying to further illustrate my point in a light hearted way, no point in getting into heavy debates about something trivial. I've no idea why you took it upon yourself to sensor my post. Apologies if humour and free speech aren't welcome in your part of the web. – Absinthe Jan 8 '18 at 22:52
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    @Absinthe As I said, your question is where you ask your question. Off topic content doesn't belong there. It's not about censoring you. You're welcome to ask an on topic question here, but you're not welcome to just put anything in a post; content that doesn't belong in a post (or a post that doesn't belong on the site) will be removed. That's the way the site is designed; there are strict quality standards. This isn't designed to be a place for people to say whatever they want, like many social networks. – Servy Jan 8 '18 at 22:54
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    Let's not go down the "free speech" road.... this is just silly and won't go anywhere productive. When you post on Stack, EXPECT heavy moderation/editing. That's the whole thing about Stack: community moderation to make Q&As better. If you consider editing out off-topic content from a question to be censoring.... you will likely have a tough time on Stack :/. If you want to post something about the chain of event "posting on meta" and "getting downvoted", look for meta effect, or ask a separate question about this. You were making NO "point" with that added paragraph (seems like just ranting). – Patrice Jan 8 '18 at 23:09
  • @Patrice Thanks for going through my question history and choosing one to downvote and leave an unhelpful comment against (stackoverflow.com/questions/48121773/…). Have I caught you on a bad day to cause you to do that? We pretend on SO that we're so smart and logical but clearly we have emotional investments that cause us to spite people when we're somehow upset about a post on a forum. – Absinthe Jan 8 '18 at 23:49
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    @Absinthe Actually that was my downvote. Don't accuse Patrice of things you can't back up. I was glancing through your questions just curiously, and when I saw that one I agreed with the existing comments and felt it was worthy of a downvote. At that point I stopped viewing your questions because I didn't want to target you as a user. But I'm not going to watch you act like you know all about who votes for what and accuse users without basis, so I felt pressed to make this comment explaining the circumstance. – Davy M Jan 8 '18 at 23:53
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    Seems as with all forums, and indeed all debates; once the mob has voted there is nothing you can do to turn the tide, every mobster wants to swim with the flow. I regret trying to ask a reasonable question here, perhaps it should be been better posted on Philosophy Stack Exchange. – Absinthe Jan 9 '18 at 0:03
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    @Absinthe you are right, we are emotional, as you can see from your own reaction to a comment+ a downvote. We attribute correlation and causation when there is none. I will admit to having close-voted that question, not downvoted. I was just going through your stuff out of habit when people post on meta (call me curious). I do not up/down vote on what I see this way to mitigate meta effect, but I do close vote as needed. BTW while that is an answer to me and my comment, it isn't an answer to anything I've actually said... – Patrice Jan 9 '18 at 0:06
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    And I am sorry I went through your profile and tried to correct some misunderstandings you have about the network, all in trying to get you a better reception and experience. Next time I'll just stay silent and vote. Once again, I realize why it's a terrible idea to explain your votes... I needed that reminder I guess. – Patrice Jan 9 '18 at 0:09
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    @Absinthe Votes on MSO, unlike the main site, tend to express agreement/disagreement with the proposal or need to consider the issue. For example, I posted a question recently proposing a modification to the text on one of the flags because the current wording leaves me confused as to which flag to use for non-english questions. It got 15 downvotes and 2 upvotes, which I understand as 15 people who see no need for change and two people who generally agree with the change. Just like your question, no one has made a comment about the actual content, so you can assume the question itself is fine. – Davy M Jan 9 '18 at 0:09
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    @Absinthe No, your edit falsely claiming that your question is downvoted within seconds and demanding people post comments when downvoting isn't in keeping with a question asking what someone should do when a wrong answer is posted to their question. It's simply off topic. I have also not "arbitrarily" decided to remove the content, I removed it because it merited removal according to the rules. Rather than just assuming everyone who downvotes all of your posts is doing so for no good reason, you should really assume that they're doing so with good reason, so that you can fix your posts. – Servy Jan 9 '18 at 14:13
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If you feel that there's an incorrect (or otherwise unhelpful) answer you should downvote it. This will send a signal both to other readers that the answer isn't good, and also to potential answerers that there isn't an existing acceptable answer. It also provides some incentives for the author of the answer to either improve it, so that it becomes a good answer to the question, or to delete it, if they feel that they can't fix it's problems. If you think that you can help the author of the answer improve it, feel free to comment with advice on how they can do so.

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You really have three (or more) options for a situation where an important question has a wrong answer, and they are not mutually exclusive:

  1. Down-vote the answer: to show that you feel that it is incorrect and that it does not contribute to this site as per Servy's answer here
  2. Answer it yourself with a more correct and complete answer
  3. Use your reputation to place a bounty on the question to attract better and more complete and helpful answers.
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  • "Answer it yourself with a more correct and complete answer" The premise here is that they're the OP of the question. They don't' know the answer, which is why they're asking, and why they're concerned with the question getting answers. – Servy Jan 8 '18 at 22:54
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    @Servy: This is not a requirement for asking a question. You in fact may ask questions and then answer them yourself, at that time, or later, and even if the OP did not know the answer on asking, knowledge base is not static, and perhaps after posting the question, they were able to solve it and gain knowledge of a better solution. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 8 '18 at 22:56
  • @HovercraftFullOfEels Yes, you are allowed to answer your own question, but the whole point of this question is that someone can't answer their own question, so they're asking for help, and they got an incorrect answer. "Just answer it yourself" isn't really helpful advice for someone in that position. If they could they wouldn't be in that position in the first place. So again, it's not that the site doesn't let people answer their own questions, it's that it's not a solution to this particular problem. – Servy Jan 9 '18 at 14:15

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