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I'm having some formatting edits I suggested for a question rejected (twice), and I'm trying to understand why as the reasons given seem, to me, obviously incorrect. To my eyes, these edits clearly improve the readability of the post, without changing the meaning in any way.

What's more, as the post currently exists, I find the code to be mildly confusing (as in: I had to take a few seconds to analyze the code before I could answer the question).

Specifically, the original Ruby code is like so

class Client

    has_one  :out , :room,  model_class: :Room,rel_class: :AssignedTo

end

class Room
  has_many  :in , :clients, rel_class: :AssignedTo, model_class: :Client

end

class AssignedTo
    include Neo4j::ActiveRel
    from_class :Client
    to_class :Room
    type 'assigned_to'
    property :from_date, type: DateTime
    property :to_date , type: DateTime
end

This code contains a number of spaces and new lines which are not only unnecessary, they are inconsistent. What's more, the order of keyword arguments arbitrarily differs in two of the methods, making it harder to pick out what are real vs superfluous differences (to be clear: I don't mean to insult the OP, I just mean that improvements are justified). I have suggested the following (rejected) edits to

  1. Remove unnecessary, inconsistent spacing
  2. Remove unnecessary, inconsistent line breaks
  3. Order the model_class: :Room,rel_class: :AssignedTo keyword args consistently, and add a space after that comma to improve readability
  4. Add additional line breaks in the AssignedTo class to improve readability (I view this suggestion as the most subjective / arbitrary, but I'm still incredulous that it doesn't improve the readability "in any way")

Changes:

class Client
  has_one :out, :room, rel_class: :AssignedTo, model_class: :Room
end

class Room
  has_many :in, :clients, rel_class: :AssignedTo, model_class: :Client
end

class AssignedTo
  include Neo4j::ActiveRel 

  from_class :Client
  to_class :Room
  type 'assigned_to' 

  property :from_date, type: DateTime
  property :to_date , type: DateTime
end

To me, these edits are obviously justified, but have been rejected twice (by four different reviewers) with consistent feedback: that the edits don't make the post even a little bit easier to read (?!) and that the edits deviate from the original intent of the post (they do not, perhaps the reviewers are not familiar with the Ruby language--but then they shouldn't be reviewing this...)

Anyway, am I missing something? I'm new to editing the posts of others, so feedback will help me in the future.

marked as duplicate by Sebastian Simon, HaveNoDisplayName, robinCTS, Code Lღver, Veve Jan 4 '18 at 13:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Since your edits need to go through a review queue, you need to make your suggestions count. Stylistic changes are not substantial enough, and are very subjective (no matter what we feel about our the correctness of our personal preferences). On top of that, code changes are take a lot more work to review. If you are going to make code changes, be sure that your edit comment properly reflects your changes, so reviewers know where and what to look for. – yivi Jan 4 '18 at 11:51
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    @yivi so I hadn't found that meta question, but I don't think it applies as the code edits discussed there seem more subjective / arbitrary (though my edits to the AssignedTo class seem equivalent). In general though, my edits to add consistent spaces, line breaks, and kwarg ordering are very important to producing a readable piece of code--and I feel like most would agree. Do you not? The original posts formatting of Client.has_one and Room.has_many was, specifically, confusing for me. – John Jan 4 '18 at 11:52
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    "perhaps the reviewers are not familiar with the Ruby language". Right, they are not. That will not stop them from reviewing, the review system is quite incapable of exposing such an edit only to users that know [ruby]. Reviews would take days, edit proposals need to be reviewed in less than an hour since a pending review blocks further edits. Nothing much to worry about, anybody that could answer such a question will have no trouble reading past a flakey snippet. Code only needs to be correct in an answer. – Hans Passant Jan 4 '18 at 11:57
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    @John You asked why would reviewers reject your edit, tried to give you pointers about possible reasons for the rejection. If what you want is argue that your edit was actually fine, well, that's a different question. Personally, I would have rejected your edit as well. – yivi Jan 4 '18 at 12:11
  • @yivi thanks, this is exactly what I was looking for: why would you have rejected my edits? – John Jan 4 '18 at 12:13
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    Read my previous comment for that. And the suggested dupe-target. And Hans comment. :) – yivi Jan 4 '18 at 12:13
  • @yivi, I saw that comment. I thought it was an explanation for why my edits were improperly reviewed. Instead, you seem to be arguing that 1. My edits do not improve readability in any meaningful way 2. You would have rejected the edits because they would have taken too much time for you to review. Is this interpretation correct? It's important for me to hear you say "yes" explicitly, because it's just so different from my own view. Going a step further, I'm surprised to find by you and HansPassant so accepting of the notion that "reviewers won't pay much attention to their work, and thats ok – John Jan 4 '18 at 12:17
  • I'm arguing that I think reviewers could have found your edits superfluous (code format); or that harder to track code changes with weak comments ("code formatting") can also trigger rejection, since it's hard to see if your changes aren't actually harming the post. – yivi Jan 4 '18 at 12:22
  • @yivi ok, I can accept that. So would a solution be to break my changes up into a series of smaller edits (edits which I can provide better comments / explanations for)? – John Jan 4 '18 at 12:23
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    No, the solution would be to generally avoid this kind of edit. You are kinda avoiding the whole "superfluous" part. – yivi Jan 4 '18 at 12:24
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    @John It's not that the edit suggestions do not improve readability, it's more that it's not really solving any problems. You're not fixing something unreadable, you're fixing something untidy. Those kind of edits are acceptable but they generate work for reviewers which is time spent that could be used for more pressing issues. They are better saved for the moment you reach 2k of rep and your edits don't need to be reviewed anymore. That isn't strictly saying the suggestions are wrong to make, just don't expect a high rate of success to see them approved. – Gimby Jan 4 '18 at 12:28
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    The other thing you need to be aware of, @John, is that the message you are seeing is one of the canned ones. Whilst it is not, technically, completely accurate, it does capture the essence of the reject reason and is certainly the most appropriate one. – robinCTS Jan 4 '18 at 12:31
  • I'm absolutely not familiar with ruby, but why is it in your opinion important to reorder rel_class and model_class? If if changes how the code works: Don't do it and comment. If it is purely cosmetic: Coding styles should never be changed. (Adding or removing whitespaces is fine if it improves readability) – BDL Jan 4 '18 at 12:31
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    @BDL to answer your question: in Ruby, the order of kwags doesn't matter. When I first started answering the question, because of the strange formatting on Client.has_one, I thought the OP was missing the rel_class: argument. Then I realized that the OP was missing a space and had used a different kwarg order for Client.has_one vs Room.has_many (It's important for both methods to have the same rel_class: value for this code to work). In addition to the missing space, the order obfuscated the problem for me. I made the edit with the goal of providing a more readable question. – John Jan 4 '18 at 12:56
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    As a corrilary, the question that yivi shared as possible answer to mine, specifically says 1. "Unneeded and incorrect indentation" 2. "Too much code on one line" as acceptable reasons to edit code formatting. With this yardstick, I think my edits to the AssignedTo class are unacceptable, but my other edits are acceptable. – John Jan 4 '18 at 13:07