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I came across this suggested edit in the review queue. I have searched on Meta and can't find a good answer about this.

I'm tempted to mark it as "no improvement whatsoever". Because it doesn't make it easier to find, more accurate or more accessible. At the same time, the argument can be made that this edit makes it easier to read, although not as significantly. I have seen some code formatting edits that truly make it easier to read. But I'm not sure how a few misspellings really make it "harder to read". The other major point is I believe Stack Overflow wants edits to be meaningful and significant.

But, this seems like an edit that should be approved. Spelling mistakes should be fixed, so why not approve it? Doesn't hurt to approve it.

There is already 1 vote for "no improvement whatsoever". Not that that factors into my vote, but I noticed that after deciding to post on Meta.

I'm going to skip this review for now, but for future reference is this an edit that should be approved or rejected?

  • 84
    Absolutely that should be accepted. All of those spelling errors should be fixed, and I for one find it much easier to read text without spelling errors than text with. The edit comment was absolutely useless, but we can't have it all. – user4639281 Jan 4 '18 at 3:31
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    I see no reason at all to reject that edit. I get distracted by spelking mistaks, and if they could all be fixed, I'd be a loads happier. – Davy M went to fund Monica Jan 4 '18 at 3:33
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    @Davy I toatolly agre with you! – Patrice Jan 4 '18 at 3:57
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    The other major point is I believe Stack Overflow wants edits to be meaningful and significant. Yes, we want users to fix as much as possible but sometimes there actually isn't much to fix. This isn't a case where someone fixed code indentation but left a bunch of spelling and grammar issues in the text or edited the tags and ignored all the other problems. – BSMP Jan 4 '18 at 4:51
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    @BSMP Those I would probably still "accept and edit." Yes, there were still problems, but the changes made were still good changes. – Draco18s Jan 4 '18 at 4:54
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    @Draco18s My understanding of Charlie's question was that they weren't sure if the edit changed enough, not whether or not they were good edits. I was just saying that the edit in question looked like it fixed everything wrong. If fixed a significant amount of the issues with the post (100%). My examples were of edits that didn't fix a significant amount of the problems. I wasn't saying that fixing indentation or tags is bad. – BSMP Jan 4 '18 at 5:15
  • @BSMP Yes, that is their question. And IMO (talking on that) I've got a pretty low threshold for "didn't change enough." The only time I haven't bothered to go in and adjust something was an edit where the the person was capitalizing i to I and typoed a single one as O and my going in afterwards to adjust the one letter felt too minimal. – Draco18s Jan 4 '18 at 5:28
  • I am far happier accepting minor edits to an answer than to a question. Answers we want to be good and clear, if not canonical. For the question, it is more the responsibility of the original author to provide a good and clear question. – Andy G Jan 4 '18 at 10:38
  • @AndyG Ah, true for recent questions, less for old questions. And that could also be related to why downvoting a question does not cost you any reputation as opposed to an answer. – Cœur Jan 4 '18 at 10:49
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    I'm of the opinion that spelling errors can significantly reduce the quality of a post. I have read novels with poor editing, but I get annoyed with them. I abandoned one self-published book after only 3 chapters because I was extremely distracted with writing that would fail a high school English class. The story was good, but it was clear that there was no editor involved. In my experience, many people (especially tech people) aren't the best writers in the world. A good answer shouldn't be ignored because the author needed someone to apply some good, simple editing. – Shawn Jan 4 '18 at 14:54
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    IMHO, even small spelling correction edits that make a significant impact to the meaning of the question are great, but mere "cosmetic" corrections that have little impact (eg changing "i" to "I") should not be done by people who need their edits approved. Such edits should be left for people who have enough rep to make them without requiring the assistance of 3 other people. – PM 2Ring Jan 6 '18 at 10:52
  • I was the "reject" vote on this edit. I felt that the spelling errors did not harm readability and that the suggested edit was too minor to justify it being in the queue. Obviously, from the reaction here, I was wrong. – Patrick Haugh Jan 6 '18 at 20:07
77

A reasonable edit to a reasonable answer. Should be accepted as post is a bit better after the edit, there are no changes to author's intent and post is still on-topic and meeting SO quality bar after the edit.

36

The only time you should push back against spelling only edits is if someone is robo-editing a single commonish typo (to farm rep points) and ignoring all the other simple to fix (other spelling problems, formatting problems, etc) items in the posts they're editing.

10

As one whose posts receive such edits, I found the edits very useful. Being a non-native speaker I very much appreciate the dedication of people who take their time and effort to point out at my mistakes.

5

Other than changing the locale (i.e. UK to US English spelling), I think that anything which would improve the quality of the post should be accepted. This would go for spelling and simple grammar issues, one of the more common ones being plural vs. possessive abuse (I have three cat's, four dog's, and two turtle's).

English is not my native language nor my mother tongue, thus if someone takes the effort to make a correction, I would find that helpful. I would imagine the author of that original post is in a similar situation.

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    Agree, but not with your "anything". As low-reputation editor's suggestions go into a review queue, it's best adviced for them to correct as much as possible. It has been put forward that even a single correction "is an improvement" in such a case, but I strongly disagree with that point of view. – usr2564301 Jan 5 '18 at 10:29
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    Tangential to this answer: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/314631/… – Booga Roo Jan 6 '18 at 3:30

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