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I had a question in one of the review lists today which was tagged with . Having no knowledge of R, I opened up the wiki and in the excerpt found:

R is a free, open-source programming language and software environment for statistical computing, bioinformatics, visualization and general computing. Provide minimal, reproducible, representative example(s) with your questions. Use dput() for data and specify all non-base packages with library calls. Do not embed pictures for data or code, use indented code blocks. For statistics questions, use http://stats.stackexchange.com.

This is the first time that I have seen distinct instructions on how to ask questions within a wiki tag which is very much against the ideologies outlined in this meta q, "The excerpt is the elevator pitch for the tag".

Should this tag excerpt be edited ?

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    That excerpt has been edited 38 times. Post instructions go back to 2012. Fairly sure that the [r] community is happy with the way it is now :) – Hans Passant Jan 4 '18 at 7:26
  • Take a look at burninate-request to see why we're all trying so hard to stop tag abuse ;) – Andras Deak Jan 4 '18 at 16:34
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    The question you link and the help page both explicitly say that you should include usage guidance in the excerpt. Failing to do so is actually a rejection reason for excerpt edit reviews. – Benjamin W. Jan 4 '18 at 17:58
  • @BenjaminW.: In context, "usage guidance" means how to know whether to add the tag to a particular question. Not how to use other features of StackOverflow, such as the "Ask a Question" button. I'm not against that kind of guidance, just pointing our that your evidence does not mean what you claim. – Ben Voigt Jan 21 '18 at 20:57
  • @BenVoigt You're right. – Benjamin W. Jan 22 '18 at 14:55
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It makes sense for tag excerpts to be shaped by the actual usage of the tag more than by generic advice in a meta post. Do people struggle more with applying the tag to questions, or with asking answerable questions with that tag?

The "elevator pitch" metaphor is flawed: any "this is why you should use this tag" advice won't be read if the user isn't already trying to add the tag to a question. Nobody browses tag pages looking for a tag that fits. The only way in which a tag wiki excerpt can help with tag usage is by making it clear that the user is making a mistake trying to add that tag. So it's closer to "common pitfalls" than "elevator pitch".

If a tag gets applied to questions where it doesn't belong, then the usage guidance should be emphasized to prevent that. Example: questions being tagged because the OP happened to be using Android Studio when developing for Android.

Non-example: questions being tagged because they are about JavaScript code that contains a variable named r. If this happened a lot, surely we'd need a prominent notice to ward off this error. But it doesn't happen. People tend to be clear on whether or not they are using R at the moment, and they have little problem guessing what Stack Overflow tag is about R. So the usage guidance isn't a priority here.

Giving tag-specific advice about dput() and non-base packages seems to be more useful than saying "use this tag if your question is about R".

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