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Question for the audit

Almost all necessary information, clear guidance, valid links for extended info, clear speech. It makes no sense to review this post negatively. Any possible issues can be purged by an edit.

Quoting Jon Clement's comment:

That was unfortunately some user blitzing identical answers across multiple questions which attracted spam flags and the deletion by a mod caused those to be marked helpful on the post which made it a candidate for audit. You weren't to know that though, and in isolation it does look like a viable answer with a kind of "see it implemented here" link.

It's been 21 days since I last failed a controversial audit. I've reviewed ~30 each day on average, passing all the audits (approx. 50) during that period. In case it really is my fault, I will understand if anyone explains it well. Given my review activity in the past few weeks, I request for forgiveness and review ban lifting or shortening.


Question for the answer itself

Suraj Rao pointed out that it was deleted by a mod for spam. I agree that it's suspicious for the last paragraph. But, it different from a plain spam that should be deleted altogether.

Consider these examples*:

Q. Why does the size of the same identifier differ in C and C++?

A1. Hey bro I found a cheap car insurance at http://finance.example.com/?referrer=ibug

A2. Because in C, structure names and variable names fall into different namespaces. In C++, however, structure/class names goes into the same namespace as variables. I have explained it in [my blog](http://blog.example.com/ibug/foo).

For A1, it's plain, blatantly irrelevant spam. I would raise a spam flag and ignore it.
For A2, it remains as a valid answer even if the suspicious link is stripped. In that case I would edit out the spam link (and possibly fix any mistakes if present) and leave the post there. What's more, the spammy link is related to the question.

In actuality, most deleted spam posts, most of which are deleted by 6 flags, are like A1 above: plain spam. Some seemingly spammy answers like A2 are often edited, as they are otherwise salvageable and may occasionally get a high score. They shouldn't be treated like A1 and are considerably difficult to spot in the given situation in a review queue.

In this very case, the answer is totally valid if the last paragraph is removed. Even if it's left as-is, the spam isn't that direct to be deleted. It's only mentioning his own repo, which does not do as much harm as a direct instruction to visit the target link (it's seen here VS you can see it here).

* This is an actual question and here is my original answer.


Miscellaneous

Thanks to Suraj Rao for the image of timeline of the post. It went through LA and was left as-is, then used in two failed LQP audits.

P.S. This (Image for <10k) is a good audit, though a bit trivial.

Ummm... Identical stuff appeared twice more... I guess this user must have posted a great lot of them so that U can run into three audits of the same stuff.

marked as duplicate by peterh, HaveNoDisplayName, il_raffa, Robert Longson, Code Lღver May 16 '18 at 8:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    here is the timeline.. As to why it is deleted, it is linked to the github repo to which the user profile is linked to. It was self promotion and is deleted as spam – Suraj Rao Dec 31 '17 at 6:51
  • If the review post had correct vote count (-2) it definitely should look like audit as quality does not match the count (I bet post got its votes for original link-only version)... Going to real post is generally good idea if you see such discrepancy... – Alexei Levenkov Dec 31 '17 at 7:03
  • Looks like a LOA in disguise to me – Nick A Dec 31 '17 at 7:15
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    @NickA With links stripped it's still a valid answer, despite being a bit vague. – iBug Dec 31 '17 at 7:21
  • @iBug I'd say that at that point it's just VLQ and would have gone to the post itself to downvote and flagged as such (of course navigating to the post and seeing it wasn't there would've indicated that it was an audit as well) – Nick A Dec 31 '17 at 7:26
  • @AlexeiLevenkov How can I go to the real post? I don't have 10k for now. – iBug Dec 31 '17 at 7:50
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    Just look at the profile of that user and you will notice that the git repo is his/her (without disclosing that in the answer post) and since the answer was deleted by a mod, it is quite likely that this person wrote multiple answers to advertise their projects. – Tom Dec 31 '17 at 8:24
  • @iBug - What AlexeiLevenkov meant by "going to real post" was to do so when in the middle of the review. This can be done by clicking the "link" word to the right of the answer at the bottom of the stats (as seen in the screenshot). – robinCTS Dec 31 '17 at 9:07
  • @robinCTS I always do this before negatively reviewing a post. I didn't this time because I didn't think the post need any action. – iBug Dec 31 '17 at 9:10
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    Oh hey - it's you again :) That was unfortunately some user blitzing identical answers across multiple questions which attracted spam flags and the deletion by a mod caused those to be marked helpful on the post which made it a candidate for audit. You weren't to know that though, and in isolation it does look like a viable answer with a kind of "see it implemented here" link. So, I've cleared those flags, re-deleted the post and giving the benefit of the doubt again, lifted the review ban. Just be very wary of posts that look like that though - they do have a slight fishy smell to them... – Jon Clements Dec 31 '17 at 11:00
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    Rejecting a flag from concerned SO users is something that needs to be taken a lot more seriously. Anything resembling "it looks okay" is not nearly good enough to assume they were wrong. It is project spam, plain as day from the post being deleted and from the user's profile. Making no effort to research the flag reason and not seeing something so easy to see is forever a good way to fail an audit. If you don't want to take the time to do it right then just don't do it. – Hans Passant Dec 31 '17 at 11:02
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    I could, but the least I'd do that for is back to 8 and I see no point in doing that because you've learnt when things smell funny, and because you're going to be extra careful when unsure, there's no need to worry about it at all, right? – Jon Clements Dec 31 '17 at 11:09
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    How about you take the approach of not worrying about how much your review ban will be if failing an audit and focus more on how you're not going to fail audits and then the ban duration doesn't matter at all and will start dropping off by itself. – Jon Clements Dec 31 '17 at 11:25
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    @iBug - if you can't see answer when navigating to the question there is a good indication (100% :) ) that the answer is deleted... and to my knowledge deleted answers don't show up in reviews unless it is audit. In any case it would be good indication to use "skip". – Alexei Levenkov Dec 31 '17 at 19:49
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    @AlexeiLevenkov Not all deleted posts in review are audits. It's possible that the post was deleted just before, or even after, you were given the audit. Of course, in that case any review action you take is pointless, but it can happen. – Servy Jan 2 '18 at 14:51
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Checks you did on this post ("Almost all necessary information, clear guidance, valid links for extended info, clear speech") are necessary prior to picking Looks OK but not sufficient. You missed at least two of very important checks.

First is for because there is a chance that answer you reviewed simply copies from some prior (good quality) post. In this particular audit this was not the case but generally, you need to check that anyway if you intend to click Looks OK. For that, you need to get to the question (outside of review queue) and check other answers to make sure it's not plagiarized.

Another important check you missed (and this is why you failed this audit) is for illegitimate . To check this you'd need to go to poster's profile and verify that links referred in the post aren't affiliated and that other posts from this account do not advertise these links in a suspicious manner.

If you did that second check you'd notice that poster's profile refers same link "capslocky" as in the reviewed answer thus missing proper disclosure of affiliation as explained eg here:

If you're linking to your own product, site, content, etc., say so, clearly. Don't expect me to infer it by correlating your username with something in the link (or its text). And don't forget that if you change your username, and were relying on that correlation in some answers three years ago, you'll suddenly start breaking the rule on disclosure. So just say so in the text. Simple. It's an easy rule to understand, and an easy rule to explain.

It isn't noise, and it doesn't have to get in the way. You can even footnote it...


Just in case if above feels like too much work, keep in mind: There is no shame in using "Skip"

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