16

In many cases, a sample input/output data is given alongside the code, which shares the syntax highlighting (deduced from question tags), like this:

How does this code

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    printf("Hello int 123456 double \"a\". // haha");
    return 0;
}

Generate the following output?

Hello int 123456 double "a". // haha

IMHO, the second block would look better without highlighting:

Hello int 123456 double "a". // haha

I'm not sure if I edit such posts, I should add something like this:

<!-- language: none -->

     Hello int 123456 double "a". // haha
  • 7
    Why not using the quotation syntax for output? Using > instead of four spaces at the beginning of a line. – Cœur Dec 17 '17 at 5:23
  • 10
    @Cœur I personally dislike it, as it's not mono spaced. – Rob Dec 18 '17 at 4:32
  • @Rob search terms are also affected, as it's harder to find an exact error message (like "word1 word2") using the internal search when it's inside code syntax (they aren't indexed the same way). To illustrate this, try finding "Hello int". – Cœur Dec 18 '17 at 4:36
  • 7
    @Cœur: Depending the output, having a proportional-width font isn't always desired, not necessarily because it looks bad, but because it's not how the output was intended to be formatted. – BoltClock Dec 18 '17 at 4:44
  • @Cœur also it alters the formatting. Some symbols may be interpreted as Markdown syntax, and it's nontrivial to escape them. /// Use code: in search. – user202729 Sep 13 '18 at 7:00
15

Put/leave the input/output in code format and just add

<!-- language: none -->

Why would you not remove the syntax highlighting? Syntax highlighting is only intended for use on the specific type of code which it's highlighting. If the default type isn't correct for any particular text, then you should add syntax highlighting hints to have the text correctly highlighted (including removing syntax highlighting where it's not appropriate).

Some people suggest using other markdown-formatting styles, in particular quote formatting. IMO, using other formatting types can lead to confusion. For instance, quote format removes line-breaks, both in how it's displayed and how it's stored in the post's source. Removing line-breaks can result in not actually representing the output which is being performed by the code, or make error-text hard to read.

Ideally, there would be another formatting style that provides a monospaced font and preformatted text. Unfortunately, there's only code format. So, for code, data (input and output), and errors put them in code format, but clearly label them.

  • 1
    The other quirk with 'quote formatting' is in some languages like python, certain structures like __init__ (which comes up as init instead). I often see block quotes used for tracebacks mislead people in this way... – Shadow Dec 19 '17 at 4:42
5

If removing the code formation from the output helps better describing/understanding the problem, do it. Otherwise, leave it as is.

I don't think the formation of small blocks that are output of a program really matters, as long as everybody understand that this is an output and not a program.

1

If you're editing it as per the example you provided, you can use the inline-code option using the ` back-tick:

`Hello int 123456 double "a". // haha`

Will result in un-highlighted, monospaced text:

How does this code

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    printf("Hello int 123456 double \"a\". // haha");
    return 0;
}

Generate the following output?

Hello int 123456 double "a". // haha

This also allows the text to wrap, which may or may not be appropriate for what you are attempting to show:

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