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I'm borrowing some of this from @Philipp's post requesting that we burninate nosql.

I suggest that the tag should be burninated.

Background: SQL is a standard that is implemented by many vendors. Some of the most popular ones are Microsoft SQLServer, PostgreSQL, MySQL, Oracle, MariaDB.

When you look at the questions tagged as , you will see they typically also are tagged with the corresponding vendor's SQL product. When users do not specify the SQL product, those who would like to provide an answer have to request clarification from the asker in which product they are using.

Let's take the litmus test from the "When to burninate" meta-meta-question.

Does it describe the contents of the questions to which it is applied? and is it unambiguous?
SQL is a standard, yes, but each vendor has different quirks that they use. It is typically ambiguous to use the SQL tag without knowing what vendor product the asker is using. Basic statements could be answered, though.

Is the concept described even on-topic for the site?
There are very few questions you could ask about SQL which are not either "which vendor is better" or specific to a single technology. The standard could be discussed but that seems off topic for Stack Overflow.

Does the tag add any meaningful information to the post?
Most questions about database technologies which are commonly grouped under SQL are perfectly described by the tag for the database technology itself. When asking a question about, say, SQL Server 2016 it makes not much sense to add the tag just because SQL Server 2016 is an SQL database because you would then add it to every single question you ask about SQL Server 2016.

Does it mean the same thing in all common contexts?
It depends on the vendor product being used.

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    By this logic, we should also burninate html, css, javascript,... – Stijn Dec 15 '17 at 15:48
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    @Chicken: Not exactly, but XML, SGML, and XHTML (in lieu of HTML) would go. CSS would have to stay lest every site revert to Geocities days. – Makoto Dec 15 '17 at 15:49
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    ...Y'know, the more I think about it, the harder it gets to defend the sql tag altogether. Anyone asking an SQL question without specifying the RBDMS usually gets that as their first comment: "What database are you using?" Standards-centric questions may live on Database Administrators instead. – Makoto Dec 15 '17 at 15:52
  • sql is a standard language on its own, tsql, mysql and plsql are extensions to it providing more functionality to standard sql – WhatsThePoint Dec 15 '17 at 15:53
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    @WhatsThePoint: But when was the last time you successfully answered a pure SQL question, or had a pure SQL question of your own? You've always relied on one of those extensions beforehand. – Makoto Dec 15 '17 at 15:54
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    @Chicken and standard python tag – WhatsThePoint Dec 15 '17 at 15:55
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    @Makoto just because its unlikely doesnt mean it doesnt happen – WhatsThePoint Dec 15 '17 at 15:55
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    @Makoto I mean, technically OP is right, but I don't think it's a realistic idea. – Stijn Dec 15 '17 at 15:56
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    @WhatsThePoint: I never said anything about "unlikely". I asked for a real example in your experience. I'll share too: I don't think I've ever had a pure SQL question or answered a pure SQL question either. I've always either used MySQL, Postgres, or Oracle, because the quirks and differences between the three only really leave the base SQL verbs for me as a developer to worry about. – Makoto Dec 15 '17 at 15:57
  • You can't have both: either it is a standard in which case there is at least a common set. Or it is not, i.e. implemented differently without a (usable) common subset. – too honest for this site Dec 15 '17 at 16:16
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    @Makoto stackoverflow.com/q/38549/7147233 – WhatsThePoint Dec 15 '17 at 16:55
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    UPDATE burninate_request SET status = 'status_declined' WHERE tag_name = 'sql'; – rgettman Dec 18 '17 at 17:48
  • Why would discussing the standard be off topic? Questions about programming language standards are on topic here almost by definition because they're about programming. – EJoshuaS Dec 18 '17 at 18:27
  • As an Oracle guy, I've been browsing questions tagged sql + oracle and I've only recently noticed the tag info that says you are not supposed to tag both. Surely oracle is a bit broad for a question specifically about Oracle SQL? (PL/SQL is the in-database programming language and not an SQL dialect, before anyone suggests that.) – William Robertson Jan 17 '18 at 17:12
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No. SQL is a query language. After the - not so latest, 2003 - additions of CTEs in the standard specification, it is Turing complete.

And while the various vendor implementations have many differences in details, the basic structure of common statements (SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE) is the same.

When you look at the questions tagged as sql, you will see they typically also are tagged with the corresponding vendor's SQL product. When users do not specify the SQL product, those who would like to provide an answer have to request clarification from the asker in which product they are using.

If I ask a question about how to do something in Python, I will be often asked "Python 2 or Python 3?". With the same reasoning, we have to get rid of the "python" tag and keep only "python-2" and "python-3". And then burninate C, PHP, HTML, ...?

One thing I agree is that questions are often - as they should - tagged with a specific DBMS / SQL product. Whether the "sql" tag is useful to be added in the SQL questions or can be removed from them, I'm not sure but I can think of one reason:

People that want to follow SQL questions, can put the "sql" tag in their favourites. If we burn it, what can they do then? (add a zillion product tags?)

Does it describe the contents of the questions to which it is applied? and is it unambiguous? SQL is a standard, yes, but each vendor has different quirks that they use. It is typically ambiguous to use the SQL tag without knowing what vendor product the asker is using. Basic statements could be answered, though.

Questions that ask "Why does my query produce error X?" or "How to do this?" should probably have a specific DBMS tag as well. As you say, basic and even advanced problems can be answered, using only standard SQL.

Is the concept described even on-topic for the site? There are very few questions you could ask about SQL which are not either "which vendor is better" or specific to a single technology. The standard could be discussed but that seems off topic for StackOverflow.

Examples of questions that are OK with only the "sql" tag:

Does the tag add any meaningful information to the post? Most questions about database technologies which are commonly grouped under SQL are perfectly described by the tag for the database technology itself. When asking a question about, say, SQL Server 2016 it makes not much sense to add the sql tag just because SQL Server 2016 is an SQL database because you would then add it to every single question you ask about SQL Server 2016.

Not every question for SQL Server 2016 (or any version) would need the SQL tag. A database design question - for the specific DBMS - could well be without it. As could a question about administration (arguably that may be off-topic for SO).


Regarding the comparison to "nosql" and the similar burninate suggestion:

There is vast difference between "SQL" and "NoSQL" and I don't mean the (SQL) standard. SQL is a language and also has several implementations (with minor or major differences). However all these implementations are pretty much based on the same model (i.e. the relational model) because the language is based on this model. The various NoSQL technologies and implementations are based on very many and vastly different models or no model at all.

  • SQL is a standard. Major RBDMSes implement said standard, and add their own little flavor on top. I'm in the middle of tracking down some generic SQL questions which work broadly - they do exist but each vendor has quirks about it. – Makoto Dec 15 '17 at 16:11
  • @Makot, I don't disagree with what you said. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Dec 15 '17 at 16:16
  • With your latest edits, you're bleeding into territory claimed by Database Administrators, specifically along the lines of database design. – Makoto Dec 15 '17 at 16:39
  • @Makoto I don't think so. Many questions (about sql, database design) are on topic and are asked on both SO and DBA.SE. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Dec 15 '17 at 16:43
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    I disagree in regards to database design. The primary questions one is looking for is, "is this efficient", and "can I make improvements to this", both questions which SO as a whole is rather allergic to. Database Administrators is welcoming this with open arms, so I don't see a reason not to take them up on this. – Makoto Dec 15 '17 at 16:44
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    If a question goes to DBA, that's fine. Still, there are hundreds asked here. I thought this meta question was regarding SO. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Dec 15 '17 at 16:45
  • The database design example was about question that have a product (SQL Server, Oracle) tag and do NOT need a sql tag. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Dec 15 '17 at 16:51

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