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I recently reported What are the reasons for using parser combinators? for spam but it was declined. The problem is not immediately obvious for the post, but in fact, it is advertising the author's own library; the answerer simply wrote that he was familiar with the library, but if you were to look on his profile, you would see that he is the actually the creator of the library! It's easy to see how the moderator did not see the problem. Furthermore, the answer did not even answer the question, so it is definitely a low-quality attempt at self-promotion. The spam label states, "does not disclose author's affiliation," as per this, so I believe that my flag is valid.

Interestingly, the answer is no longer accessible to me, implying that it was removed. However, I still have a false flag warning...

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    A [python] answer to a [haskell] question does in general not need a lot of help getting voted off the island. It got 3 downvotes, a mod deleted it 4 hours ago. Probably in response to multiple flags. Problem solved. When it is not so obvious that it is spammy, as it was here, then you tend to be better off using a custom flag and explain what you saw. – Hans Passant Dec 9 '17 at 16:14
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    So does that mean Eric Lippert can't answer C# questions anymore, or Guido python questions? – rene Dec 9 '17 at 16:17
  • @HansPassant Thank you! When I saw the "In need of moderator intervention" option, its blurb implied that it was for cases that the other options did not cover, so I did not realize that I should use it for cases which the other options did cover but need explanation. I will definitely follow your advise in the future. However, how do I resolve my current false flag warning? – Types Logics Cats Dec 9 '17 at 16:22
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    @rene If the OP were asking about the Python library, sure, let the user in question answer, but in this case, the answer was offtopic. Guido could definitely answer Python questions, but if he were to go to a Ruby question and recommend his language, I would consider him to be spamming. – Types Logics Cats Dec 9 '17 at 16:24
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    See also this very similar question from two years ago and its answers. – Ilmari Karonen Dec 10 '17 at 13:09
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    The way I read that answer, the author mentioned that library to indicate that he's familiar with the topic, not to promote the library. Perhaps he should have mentioned he's the library's author, but maybe he didn't do that because he didn't want to look like he was trying to promote it. And of course, a Python library is hardly relevant to Haskell coders (unless they also write Python), so why would he even bother to try promoting this (free) software in that answer? – PM 2Ring Dec 11 '17 at 11:57
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    So sorry for all the commotion - I saw the "what are combinators good for?" question and thought pyparsing might be a helpful data point by way of example. I've found in the past that considering how a given design or algorithm is done in other languages gives me insight into a problem in my chosen language. In future I'll try to do better to connect the dots, including my authorship of pyparsing. (The accepted answer to this question does a very nice job, in far less space than mine - thanks for saving me the trouble of deleting.) – PaulMcG Dec 11 '17 at 19:14
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A post should be marked as spam only if it advertises a product, service, or similar and is unsolicited or lacks disclosure. (source)

I honestly don't see how you can consider this:

I'm familiar with the pyparsing library in Python, which uses overloaded operators in Python to implement a combinator approach to building up parsers.

to be an attempt at spamming. Specially if the rest of the answer tries to explain with an code example how the OP might reach their goal. Now, as stated by others, that answer was on a Haskell question so it was slightly out of touch but it was an honest attempt by an user with 41,2K reputation to provide an useful answer. If cross contamination between tags is not allowed, nor providing answers for the libraries/languages our users developed, this site is doomed.

At best you should have used a custom moderator flag to explain what is bothersome about the answer. That allows you to explain your reasoning which gives the moderator the opportunity to weigh if there is merit in that.

Your spam flag will have consequences though, when the moderator marks it valid. It will give a -100 reputation penalty and the account is marked for spam activity, if you manage to do that often enough you IP-ban one of the long standing contributors to the site.

You need to adjust your spam detection. This is what spam looks like:

spam posts

and is 99 out of 100 posted by 1 rep users. If you decide to red flag a post from a user that is in good standing, make sure you're 100% sure what you're doing and a custom flag is probably better in those cases.

The post you flagged isn't near this daily crap with spam we see. The flag was correctly declined.

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Standard flags are great for standard problems. For all other problems, we have custom flags.

By that I mean that if the content you're flagging can be easily identified as a problem that would normally merit deletion, then a standard flag is perfect. Mods can cruise through those reviews fairly quickly. But if that problem is not immediately obvious, then the mods are likely to decline it because those queues are meant for quick decisions.

If the problem is not immediately obvious, use a custom flag and detail why you believe the content is problematic.


In this case, I don't agree that the post is spam. I think it does not answer the question asked (at least not adequately), but it isn't spam.

the answerer simply wrote that he was familiar with the library,

I think you're reading very far into that one portion of a sentence. I don't see any malice there, or any will to trick the OP into using the product. They are just using that as a base point comparison.

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