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I was taking a look through tags on SO today, and I came across . It has 320 questions and was last active over a year ago.

Out of interest, I went looking for more algorithm specific tags, and came up with , , , and .

As something of an aside, this whole part of the tag ecosystem is something of a mess, with and taking up sort of the same role of grouping together questions about finding the shortest path between two nodes. Perhaps they should be synonymised, but that's a question for another day.

These tags generally describe difficulties implementing the particular algorithm in question, but I have a hard time believing that someone might be an expert in just one algorithm. I feel that tags like should be fulfilling this role.

Note that I'm not asking for burnination of any of these tags, and in any case it might end up being too much trouble. However, what's the community sentiment on algorithm-specific tags? Should they exist, or do they not contribute anything meaningful?

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    It is an eminent example of a highly functional tag. It has multiple experts posting answers, @Will answered 10% of them all by himself. 87% of the questions have an answer. And active, 14 questions this year. Couldn't be better, I don't know of another tag that gets close. So what is not to like?? Don't mess with that kind of magic. – Hans Passant Dec 7 '17 at 8:38
  • Will also answered 5% of all [primes] tagged questions, which is half of the questions. So that an user happens to answer many of questions with a tag, you also need to look for related tags. If Martijn suddenly appears to have answered 30% of the questions with kittens tag, and all the questions also have python, he answered those questions because they have the python tag, not because the kittens tag. @HansPassant argument is flawed. – Braiam Dec 7 '17 at 14:33
  • "what's the community sentiment on algorithm-specific tags" - how else would you be able to find all questions of said algorithm (why to find - is another question)? Tags allow to group questions by a property, algorithm name is a perfect candidate for a tag. – Sinatr Dec 7 '17 at 14:33
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Are tags for (fill in your reason here) needed?

So to answer that, we need to ask what is purpose of tags in general.

Who needs to find the questions via tags?

Primarily answerers. Non-answerers are most likely to find the the questions and answers they are looking for via a web search engine. But answerers, the bread and butter of stack exchange, will often follow tags to help find questions to answer. So removing a superfluous minor tag is not nearly as important as getting an appropriate tag affixed. For the same reason, an incorrect tag, should be removed so as not to provide a false positive to those same answerers.

Why tags as an organizing tool?

Tags are very flexible and easy for the user to use. They are easily created in a distributed fashion, and have been shown to generally converge toward consistent meaning within a community.

There are however a couple of disadvantages, from Wikipedia:

... the resulting metadata can include homonyms (the same tags used with different meanings) and synonyms (multiple tags for the same concept), which may lead to inappropriate connections between items and inefficient searches for information about a subject.

The problem is?

The primary problems of tags is either a single tag describing two different concepts, or multiple tags describing the same concept. Note that in this definition, a not super relevant tag, isn't really a problem.

Thoughts about removing small tags.

I personally think trying to remove small tags (that are not obviously in error) that have been used more than a few times, is fighting against the tide. Some things to consider:

  1. All tags started with a list of 1 post.
  2. Someone thought the tag relevent (someone else may also).
  3. Since we are somewhat catering to answerers, and they are following tags, small use tags are likely not a big enough problem to warrant editing a post or removing a tag.

Do they (small tags) not contribute anything meaningful?

To answer your specific question: They may or they may not. But so what? Are they hurting anything? And more importantly, would the cost of policing small tags be lower than any costs associated with them being there.

  • If you copy that answer to my question meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/360145/… I would vote it up, maybe even accept it. Did you copy this answer? – tkruse Dec 7 '17 at 5:43
  • Actually, might even be better to have a generic question "Should tag ... be removed given it is not useful", and have your answer as a No-answer. Then other questions could be marked as duplicate of it. – tkruse Dec 7 '17 at 5:48
  • "generally converge toward consistent meaning within a community." [citation needed] The only tags that actually mean consistently the same thing within a group of more than two people is when a third imposes a concrete meaning and enforces it. For people, in average, the same words never mean the same thing. Cue, php/web tags, c/c++, etc. – Braiam Dec 7 '17 at 14:25
  • I am one of the bread and butter and I gave up with SO search many years ago. So this argument is not solid, answer is too broad, etc. – Sinatr Dec 7 '17 at 14:25
  • "Are they hurting anything?" Freaking yes! The bulk of askers can't create tags, so they need to select from the pool of pre-created ones, and every question needs to have a tag, so the asker is forced to at least select one to ask their question. If that pool contains crappy tags, the big numbers theory says that they will inevitably select these tags, instead of better ones. – Braiam Dec 7 '17 at 14:28
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    This answer seems like it's answering different questions than the one asked, i.e. "What are tags for? Is burnination of small tags, in general, useful?". If you want to have a discussion about either of those things, I'd suggest you post a question dedicated to it and let the discussion here focus on these specific tags. – Dukeling Dec 7 '17 at 14:49

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