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Let me preface this by saying I do have a bias against "code challenge" sites. With that out of the way, here goes.

  1. Does it describe the contents of the questions to which it is applied? and is it unambiguous?

    In one use case, it tags questions from , it doesn't describe the contents of the questions, it describes the origins of the questions.

    In another use case, it tags questions about itself.

  2. Is the concept described even on-topic for the site?

    The second use case is off-topic.

  3. Does the tag add any meaningful information to the post?

    No. The first use case adds zero information. The second use case is off-topic anyways

  4. Does it mean the same thing in all common contexts?

    As far as I am aware, it always refers to the site.

There are 32 questions under the tag as of this post's writing.

There is no tag wiki at all, leading to further misuse, and also an indication there is no clear idea on how and when the tag should be used.

Of the on-topic questions, I don't see any that suffers from the removal of the tag.


Digging around for a bit, I came across The Death of Meta Tags and realized it fits the bill pretty nicely. is indeed a meta tag and should be removed.

Progress

All have been removed. The questions have either sensible answers/discussions, closed or is pending to be closed.

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  • @SurajRao Weird. It was mentioned hackerrank should be burninated as well. – Passer By Nov 27 '17 at 6:18
  • Sometimes they come back – ivarni Nov 27 '17 at 6:18
  • If they keep coming back after burnination maybe request blacklisting the tag. – Suraj Rao Nov 27 '17 at 6:20
  • @SurajRao What I was looking at exactly – Passer By Nov 27 '17 at 6:21
  • @SurajRao is it possible to see exactly who created a tag? – cs95 Nov 27 '17 at 6:29
  • @cᴏʟᴅsᴘᴇᴇᴅ no I dont think so. A Mod maybe could – Suraj Rao Nov 27 '17 at 6:36
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    I took the liberty of editing the title, since hackerrank is a place to solve programming challenges... sorry not sorry... – cs95 Nov 27 '17 at 6:43
  • Note: The burnination process allows <50 question tags to not require the complete process, if the other conditions are met. The process for <50 question tags that meet the burnination criteria: "If you have authoritative knowledge of all technologies relevant to the tag, have conferred with at least one other trusted community member, and are dealing with a tag that has a small number of questions (< 50), then you can go ahead and remove it yourself or with a little ad hoc help." – Makyen Nov 27 '17 at 8:19
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In addition to the points mentioned in the question, I'd like to talk about a couple more.

In my experience, a lot of questions pertaining to Hackerrank are from users trying to figure out why their code could not pass the last X test cases. Hackerrank does not provide exception tracebacks on hidden test cases. This puts a majority of these questions in the "Off-topic" category, lacking MCVEs.

Other times, it's users copy pasting a wall of text from the question on the website and asking "how can this problem be solved?", which almost always ends up being Too Broad, owing to the sheer size of the problem statement (as are many of the questions on Hackerrank).

For the small minority of questions that are of good quality, there is nothing the tag can do to clarify the content or topic of the question that another tag cannot do.

So, in short, this needs to go.

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    'Oh look! A challenge/competition/race/league. . I'll get some free ringer drone to enter for me and I'll take all the credit/prizes/cups'. It's immoral and insulting. Of course all such tags should be burninated and blacklisted - their very existence is a gross abuse of SO users;( – Martin James Nov 27 '17 at 14:54

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