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I have been told on SO that you never upvote/downvote an individual. You upvote/downvote the content. We all have our own way of deciding what should we upvote/downvote.

I know a high rep user who upvotes all the questions who accepts his answer. Someone, might argue that it is his choice what to upvote/downvote however, it creates a bias in mind of the person asking the question. Consider a scenario where A asks a question, B answers it, A accepts B's answer, B upvotes the question. Next time again A asks a question B, C and D answer it. Now A knows if they accepts B's answers they will get free 5 internet imaginary points which might create a bias in mind of A for B.

Now the question how do I know that B is upvoting A's questions and all other question that B answers? After you have spend considerable amount of time in the [r] questions, you come to know that immediately. There are multiple other people in the community who are aware of this fact but were too lazy (like me) until now to bring it to meta as it is not a bigger deal. Moreover, I can give B's id if any of the mods want to confirm if this is really true or not.

I just want to know if this is an acceptable behaviour? If no, what could be done to avoid this?

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    It's totally lame behaviour, but its effects are minuscule and there's no good way to do anything about it. The kind of annoyance one should not get too worked up about. – Pekka 웃 Nov 27 '17 at 8:59
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    how does A know that B is upvoting when accepted? unless it's on B's profile: "I'll upvote any question if you accept my answer", or in comments (like the infamous "rep for rep") – Jean-François Fabre Nov 27 '17 at 20:20
  • note that some users could upvote OP's questions so they can reach 15 rep and upvote their answer after having accepted it. That's not very ethical either. – Jean-François Fabre Nov 27 '17 at 20:56
  • @Jean-FrançoisFabre how does A know that B is upvoting when accepted? The same way how we know about it. After some time you get an idea easily. – Ronak Shah Nov 28 '17 at 1:23
  • give us a name, so we can flame :) – Jean-François Fabre Nov 28 '17 at 8:52
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I just want to know if this is an acceptable behaviour?

No, it isn't.

If no, what could be done to avoid this?

Very little.

However much you say that you "know" that this is what's happening, you don't. You suspect, but you don't know.

The only way to have even circumstantial evidence would be if you know who was voting for what and when that vote was cast. Without that information, what you have is presumption, not knowledge.

We generally do not punish people based on suspicion; we want harder reasoning than this. And you can't really do that as long as voting is anonymous.

  • As I have said mods can confirm my "suspicion", for them voting is not anonymous and I am sure if the regular visitors of the [r] tag read this question they would immediately come to know whom I am talking about. It is an open secret to everyone. – Ronak Shah Nov 27 '17 at 4:58
  • You wait till green check mark is clicked and then move your attention to question, you would see a +1 within 30 seconds. – Ronak Shah Nov 27 '17 at 5:10
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    @RonakShah: "As I have said mods can confirm my "suspicion", for them voting is not anonymous" As I understand it, community-elected moderators cannot deanonymize voting; only actual employees can do that. "You wait till green check mark is clicked and then move your attention to question, you would see a +1 within 30 seconds." ... and? Unless you can prove that the vote was cast by the person whose question was accepted, it may just be a coincidence. You don't have evidence; you have suspicion. – Nicol Bolas Nov 27 '17 at 5:15
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    Ok. I had a wrong assumption that mods can unanonymize the votes. They can't !! So there is no way this can be proven. – Ronak Shah Nov 27 '17 at 5:26
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We on Meta can only pontificate about what's going on while we stare at our navels, and can only wave our pitchforks should any actual punishment need to be meted out.

You should raise a custom moderator flag about this. They're the only people that can deal with this situation, should it need to be dealt with; that is, if there is a provable pattern of irregular voting behavior. While upvoting questions for your own reasons is okay, there may be something that has to be done about downvoting everyone else's answer every single time.

  • Flagging for this reason is just wasting a mod's time, as there's nothing they're going to be able to do about this, even if it's true, which they don't even have a way of knowing. – Servy Nov 27 '17 at 14:32
  • @Servy: If there's a pattern of behavior like this, they can step in and intervene. I should make that clearer in the answer above. – Makoto Nov 27 '17 at 14:56
  • If there's a pattern of a user upvoting questions they've answered then there's nothing at all for a moderator to do. That is in no way indicating that they're voting fraudulently. A moderator will never be able to act on such a flag. – Servy Nov 27 '17 at 14:58
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Let's take the question - actually three questions:

  1. 'Now the question how do I know that B is upvoting A's questions and all other question that B answers?' - answer - as a user you can't.

  2. 'Is this acceptable behaviour' - answer - in my opinion, no.

  3. 'What could be done to avoid this? ' - answered by Nicolas Bolas - 'Only employees can do this' This maybe raises a 4th question - Why don't they?

I can understand the reason for anonymous downvotes - to avoid revenge downvotes, however why would an upvoter want to remain anonymous unless it is to hide this kind of activity?

Even if downvotes remain anonymous it would be extremely helpful if the anonymous downvoter was forced to to give a reason. A simple downvote with no reason is totally unconstructive and anonymous upvote is open to abuse.

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    You are using this question to answer an unrelated subject. If you want to rant about anonymous down-votes, go and read the canonical. – yivi Nov 27 '17 at 8:52
  • @yivi - Hardly a rant. I answered the related questions that began on the first line with a statement about - quote 'upvote/downvote' and made constructive comments on both! Perhaps you can tell me which part of my answer constitutes a rant! – kerry Nov 27 '17 at 9:38
  • Maybe anyone else has the courtesy and constructive will to explain the downvotes I have now received - but that just reinforces my argument - people that like downvoting will downvote any answer that is against anonymous downvoting without giving a logical reason. It is easy and petulant! – kerry Nov 27 '17 at 9:44
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    Getting more ranty by the minute. No, your argument isn't reinforced at all, and you keep talking about a subject that is not relevant to this question. – yivi Nov 27 '17 at 9:46
  • @yivi - again - where is the rant an opinion that opposes yours is not a rant, and which part of my argument is not reinforced. My further comments may not be relevant to the question but they are relevant to your comments. Again the 'asker' stated 'Someone, might argue that it is his choice what to upvote/downvote however, it creates a bias in mind of the person asking the question.' So I commented on both, not as a rant but simply constructive suggestions. – kerry Nov 27 '17 at 9:52
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    @kerry: "where is the rant" It's the part where you said, "Maybe anyone else has the courtesy and constructive will to explain the downvotes I have now received" and " My further comments may not be relevant to the question". When you insert off-topic material into a discussion, that is very much rant-like. Not to mention the assumption that people aren't explaining their downvotes due to lack of "courtesy and constructive will". Your statements are not "constructive" because it has been well-covered before and nothing you've said has not be said by a hundred others. – Nicol Bolas Nov 27 '17 at 16:07

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