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I earned 100 of reputation for the association bonus. But what did I do to get it? Is there a place to read the reason to get the association bonus?

I'm scared about loose my reputation, because it is hard to make new questions or good answers.

marked as duplicate by gnat, Stephen Rauch, S.L. Barth, user0042, Donald Duck Nov 8 '17 at 14:53

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    Association bonus normally means you have an account on another stack exchange site with some amount of reputation. Linked account +100 rep bonus also applied to account with 200 – George Nov 8 '17 at 13:39
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    PS, don't think too much about rep, surely you're on this site to get help and or help others, not increase a pointless number – George Nov 8 '17 at 13:49
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    "Im scared about loose my reputation" - well good, you're already far ahead of other people to do the right thing. Most people blunder because they can't care less. You on the other hand, will be careful and precise. – Gimby Nov 8 '17 at 13:49
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    @George SO rep is not a pointless number. When you have high rep even your stupid questions get more attention. – mega6382 Nov 8 '17 at 13:52
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There's a small blurb about the association bonus on What is reputation? How do I earn (and lose) it? along with a link to an old blog post about Cross-Site Account Associations. You can read about it there, but in short, since you have over 200 reputation on one site (Stack Overflow in your case), you'll be automatically awarded 100 bonus points on every site in the network when you join with a linked account.

Im scared about loose my reputation...

It's a bonus that you get on the new site. It doesn't take reputation away from anywhere else. They give you a bonus just so you can have very basic privileges (like commenting) on every site once you've shown on one site that you have at least a minimal understanding of how the rules work.

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