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I'm mostly asking in what questions should I up or downvote and how there is such a disconnect in old vs new questions.
This question has 1800 (likely more) upvotes and shows literally zero attempt at research or effort, and as such should be downvoted.
This question picked at almost random, shows attempt and effort, yet gets voted down quickly.

I could show numerous other examples of (imho) bad questions that are upvoted and decent questions that are downvoted. When exactly should I up or downvote questions and how do you explain the incredible difference between bad old questions and decent new ones ?

This answer provides a slight bit of insight.... but not definitively.

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  • Related: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/252677/… – user0042 Nov 7 '17 at 19:24
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    The two highly upvoted questions you mention describe problems that a lot of programmers need and are formulated in a way that they can easily found. Compared to the other questions, it is highly likely that they will help future visitors. – BDL Nov 7 '17 at 19:34
  • Yes, but fundamentally they're both questions that are answered in the first couple chapters of whatever book (or tutorial) you read to learn the language. – xyious Nov 7 '17 at 19:36
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    "I have been working for hours" is not demonstrative of effort. Neither is a code dump. – Sotirios Delimanolis Nov 7 '17 at 19:36
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    Your example question is also almost ten years old, which means it's accrued a lot of attention, traffic, and upvotes. That's not really a good place to start looking. – Makoto Nov 7 '17 at 19:37
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    Your second example of a "good" question is just a code dump, an incoherent question, and no description of the problem. It's not a good question. The fact that the question contains some code doesn't make it a good question. Your standards are way too low. – Servy Nov 7 '17 at 19:39
  • @Makoto My point is: should it not be consistent ? Should questions that got upvoted 10 years ago get upvoted today ? Shouldn't terrible questions from 10 years ago be downvoted today ? – xyious Nov 7 '17 at 22:50
  • @Servy I said decent. It contains a common error being that '+' is an integer and we're trying to read an integer from std::cin. It's a valid question that should probably be answered rather than downvoted and deleted. – xyious Nov 7 '17 at 22:51
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    @xyious No, it's not decent. It's terrible. Really, really, terrible. It's not a valid question at all. It's certainly not anywhere close to an answerable state at the moment, nor does it merit anything other than delete votes and close votes until the author is able to improve it to provide a coherent question and an accurate description of the problem. It doesn't need to be deleted as it's theoretically salvageable by the OP, although this is a case where I would consider it sufficiently unlikely that the OP will fix it that I wouldn't shed a lot of tears if it was deleted. – Servy Nov 7 '17 at 23:08
  • Please don't downvote questions just for lacking visible research, downvote questions which are bad. One does not necessarily imply the other. – Gimby Nov 8 '17 at 10:59
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how do you explain the incredible difference between bad old questions and decent new ones ?

  1. Standards change. At one point in time, we didn't have rigid standards. The two "bad old questions" you cite are from 2008, early in the site's history. We're almost 10 years from then.

  2. Those "bad old" questions weren't particularly bad. Oh sure, they're basic. But that doesn't mean bad. Back then, there weren't umpteen-different duplicates of "how to set a bit". As such, the question represents genuinely useful knowledge. And it is the dupe-target (or is referenced by) nearly 150 questions. It doesn't need an MCVE, since it's not a question about a specific program.

    Similarly, string-to-int conversions in language X are a basic question. But it's still useful knowledge. And again, back in 2008, we didn't have a prior question for how to do this in Python.

    Both of these questions have become canonical questions. The bit-setting question is reference from or a dupe-target for almost 150 questions. The Python one has nearly 75 questions talking about it. That is good. Those questions are helping a lot of people.

  3. The "decent new" questions aren't particularly decent. The int argument question is a typical "I can haz codez debug" question. Oh sure, it has an MCVE... except that it's hardly "minimal". It's nearly 150 lines long, for something that shouldn't take more than 15 to reproduce. It's caused by someone who doesn't understand how pointers work, and the compile error is being as helpful as it can (int* isn't an int). And the solution to it will help fairly few people.

    Similarly, this C++ calculator question is another "I can haz codez debug" question. It's caused by someone trying to read an integer when they wanted to read a character. The simplest effort spent debugging it would give some clue as to what's going on (print out what o is, or look at it in a debugger). And similarly, the solution to it will help fairly few people.

You are perhaps confused as how questions without code examples can be considered better than questions with code examples. Well, not every question needs a code example. If you're saying "my code doesn't work", then your question needs one. If you're asking how to perform some particular operation, a code example isn't necessary, since you don't really know how to do the thing you're asking about.

but fundamentally they're both questions that are answered in the first couple chapters of whatever book (or tutorial) you read to learn the language.

And now, they'll be answered by any Google search about setting bits in C++ or doing string-to-int conversions in Python. That's a good thing.

Books are a good way to learn things. But they are not the only way.

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  • One question remains, should the "bad old" questions be upvoted ? If either of those questions were to be asked today they would get 10 downvotes within minutes and then they'd get deleted or closed (regardless of whether or not a similar questions exists). As for the decent questions, they may not have been great examples but they were on the first page and had 5+ downvotes within 10 minutes. I picked them more or less at random to prove a point. – xyious Nov 8 '17 at 5:12
  • @xyious: "If either of those questions were to be asked today they would get 10 downvotes within minutes and then they'd get deleted or closed (regardless of whether or not a similar questions exists)." I don't agree. If those questions really didn't exist, if there were no dupe-targets for them, I think they would get along fine. They're not Too Broad. They're not Off Topic. They're not duplicates or opinion based. So there's no reason to close them. Some might downvote due to them being basic, but others would likely upvote due to usefulness, since we don't have that info here. – Nicol Bolas Nov 8 '17 at 5:18
  • @xyious: "they were on the first page" Every question, at some point, is on the first page. It's ordered (by default) based on how recent the question is, with newer ones at the top. "had 5+ downvotes within 10 minutes" Because it was on the first page, so a lot of people saw it. – Nicol Bolas Nov 8 '17 at 5:19

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