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I found this question that had an answer that I needed.

However, when I tried to use the answer, I found that it was too long and that there are many parts that are not really an answer to the question which is [How to] send an iphone attachment through email programmatically. (The answer is somehow specific to what the questioner wanted though.)

I can produce a more generic answer, basing from the accepted answer.

Since I believe this generic answer will be of more help than the accepted one, I'm thinking of:

  1. Posting it as a different answer
  2. Editing the accepted answer

Doing 1. I think becomes plagiarism. Reputation is not a problem, I will just mark it as community wiki. Doing 2. becomes too much edit that deviates from OP's intention. Now I'm not sure what to do.

I am also planning on improving the question, since I'm already there.

tldr; Is it acceptable to summarize an answer into a different answer? Or is it better to edit the current answer? or another thing entirely?

Edit: While I was writing the generic answer, I thought of adding more details related to sending an email attachment programatically, and before I knew it, I have written a somewhat more detailed answer. Since I have already cited the answer and the user at the top most part of my generic answer, and since my answer has now become somewhat more mine than theirs, I thought of not marking it as community wiki. If however, the community has some issues regarding this decision of mine, please let me know via this meta question or on a comment the answer itself, and I will hastily mark it as one.

  • 1
    check stackoverflow.com/help/referencing for correct way of attribution – Suraj Rao Nov 7 '17 at 7:31
  • Oh yeah, I can and will reference the original answer in the new answer (if I do 1. by saying something like: original <this is a link> is somewhat specific so I created a more generic answer... – Keale Nov 7 '17 at 7:37
2

I think an additional answer along these lines would be reasonable:

Building upon user1234's answer to make it more generic...

It's not plagiarism, as you are properly citing the source, and it still provides a benefit to the community.

  • As long as I cite the original answer, it's not plagiarism? Now that I think about it, I should have just done that from the very start. I got confused because the original answer will still be in the same question thread, so I thought it might look outright plagiarism. But with citation, there will be no more plagiarism. Thanks :) – Keale Nov 7 '17 at 7:46
  • @Keale Citing another answer when using the cited resource to supplement your own original work is not plagiarism. Citing an answer when you merely reproduce it without adding your own original contributions is plagiarism. So no, saying, As long as I cite the original answer, it's not plagiarism? is not true. See the help center article on referencing mentioned above for more details. – Servy Nov 7 '17 at 14:41
  • @Servy Ah, so just merely summarizing the answer into another answer even with the citation is plagiarism? I see. In such a case, what is the best thing to do to pull out the important bits from the answer? – Keale Nov 7 '17 at 16:22
  • @Keale If another answer suitably answers the question and there's nothing that needs to be added to it for it to answer the question, then vote to close the question as a duplicate. – Servy Nov 7 '17 at 16:23
  • Oh, and for the question in my OP, aside from actually summarizing the answer I cited, I added more details, so I believe that it is not plagiarism anymore. If you think otherwise though, please let me know. Thanks :) – Keale Nov 7 '17 at 16:24
  • @Servy Sorry, I seem to be getting confused. What I want to do is make the answer more generic, so that people can just see the answer instead of wading through a long source code just to get to it. Now, if there is another separate question with the answer suitably answering the original question, I understand closing as a duplicate. What I am confused is what to do otherwise, when there are no other questions like it, and the answer is there, just not easily found. Though IMO, what I'm worried about is probably a really rare case. – Keale Nov 7 '17 at 16:31
  • @Keale If it's another answer on the same question, then either you can cite it to supplement your own original solution in which you create a derived original work using it, or, if you feel you don't need to add anything to what's there, then just don't post an answer. – Servy Nov 7 '17 at 16:35

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