14

This question (since deleted by OP, consult the screenshot) is basically asking "how do I install this?".

This is well covered on that project's documentation but I'm hesitant to just paste a link because that's not in the spirit of Q&A. However I also don't want to rewrite the manual as an answer - what's the best approach for questions like this?

Here is a screenshot of the (now deleted) post:

enter image description here

5
  • 11
    That seems like it could qualify for Off topic > Question asking for off-site resource, or even too broad.
    – Nisarg
    Nov 3 '17 at 5:10
  • Well, that question has been flagged out and the link is accessible no more.
    – bhansa
    Nov 3 '17 at 6:18
  • 2
    There is no such concept as "flagged out". The person who originally posted the question has deleted it. @bhansa
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Nov 3 '17 at 6:26
  • @CodyGray Oh yes, its deleted.
    – bhansa
    Nov 3 '17 at 6:29
  • Note: Since the post in question was deleted and is only viewable by 10k+, moderators and the OP, this question should be edited in order to show what it is/was. Nov 3 '17 at 11:37
29

When is it OK to refer someone to the manual?

Whenever the manual says something relevant to answering the question.

This is well covered on that project's documentation but I'm hesitant to just paste a link because that's not in the spirit of Q&A. However I also don't want to rewrite the manual as an answer - what's the best approach for questions like this?

That's correct. Pasting a link to the manual would not provide an answer to the question. Answers on Stack Exchange sites are required to be self-contained, without requiring that any links be followed. An answer consisting of little more than a link to the manual would be a candidate for a "not an answer" flag, and thus removal.

However, you can certainly answer the question with a quotation or summary of the relevant information from the manual, and then include a link to the manual for reference (and attribution). This would make for an excellent answer, in fact.

This question is basically asking "how do I install this?".

There is a major difference between a question basically asking "how do I install this?" and a question that is literally asking "how do I install this?". The former is a perfectly valid question; the latter is far too broad for Stack Overflow.

We entertain only specific, practical questions about programming. "How do I install this software?" is far too broad for Stack Overflow, and thus should be flagged/closed as "too broad". That would have been the correct way to handle this question, had the asker not beaten us to the punch by self-deleting it.

However, if someone had asked a narrowed, contextualized, specific question about installing a programming tool, yet the manual still contained an answer to the question, then you should answer it as described above.

Use your best judgment, as someone capable of answering the question, to determine whether or not the question is "too broad" to be reasonably answered in our Q&A format.

4
  • I assumed the point of avoiding links was so that stack overflow could become a manual of sorts... Nov 5 '17 at 4:56
  • 3
    @Alexander We absolutely do not "avoid" links. The only expectation is that your answer not consist solely of a link, and that's for practical reasons—links rot, thus making the answer useless. Moderators delete ten or more old answers per-day that consist of nothing more than a link that has gone dead, and that's a real waste. So, our current standards require that answers be self-contained. This ensures that the answer will remain useful, even if the link goes dead. But avoiding links is not only foolish, but unacceptable, as you lose ability to provide proper attribution for content.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Nov 5 '17 at 5:58
  • @CodyGray "Moderators delete ten or more old answers per-day that consist of nothing more than a link that has gone dead" - really? Something that from first reading alone seems trivial to automate requires moderators to do it? Comment has only link, link is dead, link has remained dead for 10 days in a row, delete it... Heck make it 50 days in a row as a threshold Nov 5 '17 at 22:22
  • "and that's for practical reasons" It's a practical reason given to explain the concept to the [large] subset of the population who cannot comprehend more esoteric reasons, those that drive the sort of quality we want to attract here. In fact links are not avoided only for link rot reasons, but also because "bringing the content here" makes for a better, more useful, more voteable, more reviewable, more consistent experience. Nov 6 '17 at 10:28

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .