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Stack Overflow questions

After spending some time on the Stack Overflow community I came across a lot of bad, low content, duplicate and too broad questions.

These questions always got the worst of me since the website directs and helps you to create the best possible question for you and the community.

Realising a lot of people do not actually care about making a nicely formatted question or even doing researching themselves for their answer got me thinking, can Stack Overflow improve their tutorial to making a question on Stack Overflow?

What if, on creation of an account you have to go through a tutorial/guide on how to make a proper question?

This meaning, people have to complete a ... steps course on creating a well made question. This intro to the website will show people how to create a good question, without them actually skipping the guide page rushing for their answer.

I guess you could kinda compare this to Codecademy, where you have to go through a course to complete the (tutorial).

Why do I think this could be good?

Mods would have less trouble going through posts because users will be better informed on what the website wants and requests their questions to be asked.

It will be easier to find answers for your questions in the future since the community has better asked questions throughout the website.

And people will be more eager to help you and others since the questions asked are more easily understandable (even if one or another is not that good in English, the questions are possibly still better to read).

My opinion

I think this would be a great addition to the Stack Overflow community, because the amount of bad asked questions is overwhelming… people asking too broad questions, requesting help without for example code etc. This is all extra work for mods and high rep users.

Having this kind of system will prevent people from creating burner accounts to ask a quick question because they are too lazy to do research themselves, or people asking questions where they want the community to do everything for them.

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    Unless the new users are 'forced' to read the guide pages by, say, introducing a delay before the next page becomes available, then the users will click though immediate because the only thing that matters is getting their question asked. The suggestion of a delay to enforce reading has already been suggested and soundly rejected as an 'unwanted obstacle' to new users. OK, most of the new users are puppets and.or homework vamps on a one-account-per-question strategy, but SO does not want any impediments. Anyway, the abusers would just run several account-creation scripts in parallel:( – Martin James Oct 16 '17 at 12:41
  • That is a interesting way on looking at it indeed, and I have not looked at it like that. This is surely something that has to be taken in consideration. Maybe a randomized order of questions and tasks, so that they actually have to take time for it. – Tomm Oct 16 '17 at 12:43
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    I mean, I have every sympathy with your POV because of the undeniable trash level, but I would be staggered if any kind of mandated guide happened. – Martin James Oct 16 '17 at 12:44
  • True, let's just pray.. – Tomm Oct 16 '17 at 12:44
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    It's the only way of looking at it:( Many 'new' users don't give a PHP how much of anyone else's time gets wasted, it's I WANT MY QUESTION ANSWERED NOW AND I DONT CARE WHAT I HAVE TO DO TO GET MY ANSWER NOW I WANT MY ANSWER DONT MAKE ME READ STUPID RULES AND GUIDES 'COS I WANT MY ANSWER NOW AND READING STUFF GETS IN TEH WAY I WANT MY ANSWER NOW STOP WITH THE RULEZ I WANT MY ANSWER. – Martin James Oct 16 '17 at 12:48
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    You forgot to add the, I have no code in my question but you can make my assignment for me – Tomm Oct 16 '17 at 12:49
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    related: meta.stackoverflow.com/a/326873/578411 – rene Oct 16 '17 at 13:41
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    @MartinJames Anyway, the abusers would just run several account-creation scripts in parallel:( I would bet, if people has enough knowledge to write such scripts, they also have enough knowledge to ask positive received questions. – Christian Gollhardt Oct 16 '17 at 14:36
  • @ChristianGollhardt yes indeed, and I would hope that they do so. I'm not holding my breath, however. Besides, you don't have to write scripts, just plagiarize those that already exist. No point in doing any work if it can be avoided, after all, that's what SO is for - a collection of homework drones/slaves:( – Martin James Oct 16 '17 at 19:33
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    While it may be beneficial for users asking questions to go through this, why should a user who has no intention of asking a question be forced to go through a tutorial about how to do so? Stack Overflow isn't just about asking questions. It's also about answering questions. Some users never do one or the other of those. If you want some sort of tutorial about asking a question, then it should be when the user is going to actually ask a question, not when they sign up. This also presents the information to them closer to the time they need it, rather than some unknown amount of time prior. – Makyen Oct 17 '17 at 1:53
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    @MartinJames I struggle to understand how you(and others) think. You claim that because now people don't use tutorial/wizard that doesn't exist it somehow proves that they are not going to use it ??? There is a big difference between forcing new users to do something and actively guiding them. – Oleg Oct 17 '17 at 4:09
  • @Makyen have you taken this small factor in consideration where people that only need to look for an answer on the website do not actually need an account? I support you saying " Some users never do one or the other of those. If you want some sort of tutorial about asking a question, then it should be when the user is going to actually ask a question, not when they sign up. This also presents the information to them closer to the time they need it, rather than some unknown amount of time prior. " this is indeed something that can be looked into. – Tomm Oct 17 '17 at 6:34
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    @Tomm, Yes. However, I'm not sure why you ask. I was talking about people writing answers, not looking for them. If the user isn't going to be asking a question (i.e. they're answering, not asking), why should they be forced to go through a tutorial about how to ask? In addition, why force a user who's just registering (for whatever reason) to go through a tutorial on asking just to register, it's bad UX, and bad from a learning perspective. If we want them to go through an asking tutorial, then it should be at the time they are asking their first question, not an unknown amount of time prior. – Makyen Oct 17 '17 at 6:42
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    There is some merit to this. I think many (most?) new users treat the SO help center as they do any terms and conditions on any other site. I think account creation is the wrong time to do it though. Perhaps the first time they get a downvote would be better? – Sam Hazleton Oct 17 '17 at 15:04
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you have to go through a tutorial/guide

No, because (@MartinJames):

Many 'new' users don't give a PHP how much of anyone else's time gets wasted, it's I WANT MY QUESTION ANSWERED NOW AND I DONT CARE WHAT I HAVE TO DO TO GET MY ANSWER NOW I WANT MY ANSWER DONT MAKE ME READ STUPID RULES AND GUIDES 'COS I WANT MY ANSWER NOW AND READING STUFF GETS IN TEH WAY I WANT MY ANSWER NOW STOP WITH THE RULEZ I WANT MY ANSWER.

It should NOT be a stick, how about making it a carrot? E.g. upon registration user will get even less rights than they have now (we remove something or add something nasty to remove!) and a hint telling them to go through tutorial to get their first points, and points will unlock/remove that, making user that what a normal user with 0 reputation is now?

Making tutorial a kind of game is another idea, reading text is boring, getting score is fun. Though I don't have a good idea what kind of game that would be... Quiz?

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    I'm totally down with making people pass a test before they can ask questions here – SomethingDark Oct 17 '17 at 15:25
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    Something nasty to remove? Hmm, let's see… how about a giant banner covering half of the screen? – Cody Gray Oct 17 '17 at 15:44
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    As long as the banner is on-topic rather than a secretly being a jobs link – Kevin B Oct 17 '17 at 15:53
  • The trouble with a quiz is that it will have a finite set of questions and answers; eventually they are going to end up on a cheat sheet somewhere and everyone will game the game. Heck, someone will probably develop a browser plugin to automatically answer... – Gimby Oct 18 '17 at 9:28
  • @Gimby once the time is there that the ANSWER MY QUESTION PLEASE IT ISN'T TO BROAD people create a script to answer every possible question, they are so far in script languague that they do not even need SO anymore. – Tomm Oct 19 '17 at 6:08
  • @Tomm I think you completely misunderstand what is being talked about. – Gimby Oct 19 '17 at 6:48
  • Please explain? – Tomm Oct 19 '17 at 6:50
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To reduce the number of duplicate questions, there should be an actual list of canonical answers somewhere. ServerFault has a partial one, but it seems that we have to extrapolate based on data, which no new user is going to do.

I mostly stick to the [batch-file] tag, and the most common question that I see is "why isn't this variable value updating inside of a for loop?" There are only so many ways to say "stick setlocal enabledelayedexpansion at the top of your script and use !variable! instead of %variable%," but there are still several very good answers to this question, including this one, this one, this one, this one, you get the idea.

The point is that if there was a page somewhere where you picked your language and a general description of your question, that would prevent some duplicates and then if the user didn't see their question listed, there'd be an "I don't see my question" option with a link to then ask their question.

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How about questions being asked in a template that the user has to fill?

Such as

'My minimal example is ...'

'The steps I tried to reproduce the issues are ...'

'It yielded the following error: ...'

'I googled using the following phrases: ...'

'This question is not a duplicate of for the following reason(s): ...'

If the template is right in our face it is much more difficult to forget what the steps are. I'm assuming a user writing in good faith but overwhelmed with the process, as in my experience this is what led me to post sub-optimal questions.

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