8

I am bringing this up in response to this question.

The OP posted about an error being thrown from their code and asked why it was being thrown. Another user quoted the guidelines which states the following:

Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example.

The language in this statement is actually ambiguous since it can be interpreted in two ways:

  1. All questions must have a desired behaviour, as well as a specific problem or error
  2. All questions must have a desired behaviour, or a specific problem, or an error.

Which one is it?

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    "Must include: the desired behaviour; a specific problem or error; and the shortest code necessary..." – jonrsharpe Oct 16 '17 at 6:56
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    If this is the case, then perhaps could the guidelines/rules be updated to use this clearer grammar? I also am a bit confused behind why this is the case, the question was why the error was being thrown, someone else may also get this error, look up stack overflow to figure out why that error was being thrown but have a different desired behaviour for the code. – Cameron Aavik Oct 16 '17 at 7:06
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    From my point of view Desired behavior is always revelant. Because if we simply show the error and how to reproduce, we loose the context, the meaning, the "Why?". X/Y problem Have you heard about it? Og has a good mcve a good error, but none of what he write is revelant because thats not even what he want. – Drag and Drop Oct 16 '17 at 7:30
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    By "desired behavior", would it be sufficient to say "This code is supposed to compile and run without crashing, but it gives a 500 GTFO Noob error when I run it.", or is a more detailed explanation required, e.g. "This code is supposed to sum an array and output the sum, but it gives a 500 GTFO Noob error when I run it."? – Robert Columbia Oct 16 '17 at 16:58
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    I love it when programmers get really technical about grammar and end up making silly spaghetti of it. – NH. Oct 16 '17 at 21:18
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    Just noticed this when looking at the original question: there are italics (please edit your question to include them) which make a world of difference here and help you group the terms. – NH. Oct 16 '17 at 21:20
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    @NH - Good point. The formatting makes it completely clear and unambiguous, I think. – SiHa Oct 17 '17 at 13:07
  • @SiHa I don't see that alternative formatting in the guidelines when I look at it. So I don't understand the edit to add formatting that isn't there. – Cameron Aavik Oct 17 '17 at 23:14
  • @CameronAavik Indeed - my apologies, I (evidently mistakenly) assumed that the formatting in the guidelines would mirror that in the off-topic flagging dialog. Edit rolled-back. The formatting does make a huge difference though, the guidelines should be changed, – SiHa Oct 18 '17 at 7:00
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    The oxford comma from Makyen, and the italics SiHa and I noticed, have been put into the request: meta.stackoverflow.com/q/358082/1739000 This serves as the actionable result of this discussion chain. – NH. Oct 18 '17 at 16:34
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    Isn't the desired behavior implicitly obvious in these kinds of questions? If I step on a nail the doctor doesn't wonder "hmmm, maybe he wants a matching one in the other foot", the desired outcome is obvious, make it go away! – John Hascall Oct 18 '17 at 21:37
39

A serial comma (also called an Oxford comma) should have been used prior to the "and". Without the comma, it's slightly ambiguous. While many people omit the serial comma, it should not be omitted when doing so makes the interpretation of the sentence less clear. This is particularly true when the individual items in the series are complex (e.g. also contain conjunctions).

However, even though the sentence doesn't have a serial comma, there's really only one grammatical interpretation.

The sentence should be interpreted as:

The question must include, in the question itself, all of

  1. the desired behavior,
  2. a specific problem or specific error, and
  3. the shortest code necessary to reproduce the specific error or problem (a MCVE).

For the text:

Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example.

The "or" in "a specific problem or error" joins two nouns, both of which have the adjective "specific" modifying the noun (i.e. "specific problem or specific error"). This use indicates that the "or" conjunction is the tightest coupling within that localized area of the sentence. Thus, the "and" joins the list of three requirements.

Trying to interpret it the other way, with the "or" breaking two lists of two items, ends up with a non-grammatical parsing, as there's no conjunction between "the desired behavior," and "a specific problem".

  • 26
    Not using Oxford commas risks undesirable results. – Cody Gray Oct 16 '17 at 11:59
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    @CodyGray Somewhat NSFW, but a good demonstration. – AaronLS Oct 16 '17 at 12:41
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    I mentally inserted the comma anyway, and had to read several times to spot the ambiguity (before I read this answer, obv.) – SiHa Oct 16 '17 at 15:46
  • There is a third mostly-grammatical parsing, which took me several readings to recognize: "or" is the conjunction joining a three-part list (again with no serial comma), and "and" merely joins the two elements of the compound third element: "(an) error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself". The missing article is a problem for this reading, of course, since the "a" in front of "specific problem" shouldn't apply across the conjunction. – Kyle Strand Oct 16 '17 at 21:20
  • ....that said, I'm guessing this reading is more likely to have been OP's interpretation. – Kyle Strand Oct 16 '17 at 21:20
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    While I see now the intended meaning, I believe I interpreted it the way I did because requiring desired behaviour with errors didn't make sense to me and that caused me to interpret it a second way which followed what I thought it should have been. – Cameron Aavik Oct 16 '17 at 21:55
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    Completely SFW example of the comma's potential import: theguardian.com/books/2017/mar/16/… – Josh Caswell Oct 17 '17 at 13:26
  • @Josh Your article has this image inlined, and you implicitly complain that mine is NSFW? I mean, come on, Ayn Rand? ;-) – Cody Gray Oct 18 '17 at 16:54
  • @CodyGray Bad Guardian! Naughty, naughty Guardian! No Pulitzer for you! – Josh Caswell Oct 18 '17 at 17:05
7

Quoting from help/mcve, first point under the Verifiable heading:

Describe the problem. "It doesn't work" is not a problem statement. Tell us what the expected behavior should be. Tell us what the exact wording of the error message is, and which line of code is producing it. Put a brief summary of the problem in the title of your question.

Therefore in light of the above statement, expected behavior is a must along with the other things.

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