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When I visit the Stack Overflow homepage, and I'm not logged in, there is a big button for logging in with Google. When I click it, I'd expect to be left on the current page I'm on (https://stackoverflow.com, in this case), but instead it takes me to my Developer Story page.

Is this by design? It always surprises me a little because there isn't much wording on the home page to suggest that clicking the "Google" button is going to take me to my Developer Story.

Screenshot of the home page showing the login buttons and where they navigate to.

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    Bait and switch. – Kevin B Oct 6 '17 at 18:10
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The Google/Facebook buttons in the hero (big blue box) are actually for signing up. It's kinda cool that it lets you sign in without forcing you to go down a separate path, but the experience is optimized for sign ups. Routing new users to the dev story is a standard part of our on boarding. It supports one of our revenue streams that enables us to keep the lights on here at Stack Overflow. User are provided the option to skip it, so we certainly aren't forcing anyone to do anything that they don't want to do

Simple solution which you already discovered is for you to click Log In.

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    ...the experience is optimized for sign ups. Thus it routes you to Dev Story. What's the reasoning behind that? It doesn't seem obvious that people who sign up from the home page are more interested in setting up a Developer Story than asking or answering a question. Is it that Stack Overflow is trying to push the Developer Story side of the website, and by taking people there after sign up, SO gets every new user to see it? – tehDorf Oct 5 '17 at 20:15
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    Yes, routing new users to the dev story is a standard part of our on boarding. It supports one of our revenue streams that enables us to keep the lights on here at Stack Overflow. User are provided the option to skip it, so we certainly aren't forcing anyone to do anything that they don't want to do. – Joe Friend Oct 5 '17 at 20:30
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    Thanks for the clarification - looking at it from that perspective, it makes sense. – tehDorf Oct 5 '17 at 20:33
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    @tehDorf updated the answer with details from my comment. – Joe Friend Oct 5 '17 at 20:35
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    Wouldn't it make more sense for the "route to dev story" be part of the signup logic, and not just a feature of the button? That way already existing users wouldn't have the surprising routing/redirect. – mbrig Oct 6 '17 at 21:40
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    @mbrig Now that would make some real sense – Olu Smith Oct 7 '17 at 10:34
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    @JoeFriend If the user is signing in as an existing user, I feel the sign in button ought to handle them differently to a new joiner. That's not complicated to do server-side and would improve quality of life for existing users. Meanwhile a sign-in button that reliably forwards me onto a page I don't want to interact with is not really considered very polite or enjoyable UX, and I'm certainly glad I don't interact with that button. (Imagine if every time you opened up Word or Gmail, it presented you with a "Welcome! Let's take a tour..." page instead of letting you get straight to business.) – doppelgreener Oct 11 '17 at 18:58
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    Oh wow. So I click on a button which, evidently, lets me join a place to “Learn, Share, Build”, which is called “Stack Overflow”. And the button actually brings me to a career site. I expect this kind of bait-and-switch tactic from Facebook, but I didn't expect it here. This is not up to the level of integrity that Stack Exchange had displayed in the past, and which had made me feel safe and respected. Such things make me seriously fear for the continued viability of Stack Exchange or Stack Overflow, and make me reluctant in recommending it to anyone. – Gilles Oct 11 '17 at 19:01
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    This pretty much is a textbook example for darkpatterns.org – enderland Oct 11 '17 at 19:24

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