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I am very concerned to only ask questions I did my research on. Although I tried my best to formulate the question with a bit of background information, code examples and support material, I am getting downvotes and votes to close.

Algorithm for bitmask on CAN messages

How can I imporve my question to get better answers and more acceptance?

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    If you're asking for something "elegant", you first have to define what would be not elegant and why. Showing what you tried that wasn't elegant and explaining why you feel that way would be a good addition to your question. – user400654 Sep 26 '17 at 16:43
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    Choosing the right target audience for a question is very, very important. Out of, say, a thousand people that would look at question tagged with [c++] or [algorithm], maybe half a guy has half a notion of what CAN is all about. Just tagging it [can] and nothing else would have been appropriate. – Hans Passant Sep 26 '17 at 17:31
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From what I see, your question suffers from two critical flaws:

  • A presumption that your research in the subject matter translates to clarity when posed, and
  • A tough-to-define scope of what is a "correct" answer (since "elegant" is highly subjective)

The two key things that might help your question would be to include what efforts you've made on the Motorola front, such as what errors you're encountering and where it's gone wrong, as well as removing any phrasing that makes it sound like you're asking us to write the entire algorithm out for you. We're happy to help you, but we want to be sure that we're helping and not taking on all of the work.

  • would it be acceptable to reformulate the question and post it again or should I use the existion one and rewrite it? – mxcd Sep 26 '17 at 17:00
  • @maximilian009: Technically it's on hold now, so it's fine to edit it and revise it for reopening. I'm not so certain how successful you will be, but it's worth trying. Definitely don't repost the question until that one has truly been removed from the site. – Makoto Sep 26 '17 at 17:02
  • I reformulated the question. I hope its clearer now... – mxcd Sep 26 '17 at 17:27
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I am searching for an algorithm...

Questions asking us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it.

Now, this one isn't really the spirit of the post, so my suggestion is to remove that phrase from the post.

What would be an elegant algorithmic approach...

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.

All I can suggest (because I'm not an expert in that technology) is to be more precise about what you are after. What metrics do you want to improve?

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    My counter-suggestion would be to stop triggering closure based on phrasing… The spirit of the post is what it should be based on in the first place. If you can trivially remove a phrase from the question and it magically becomes on-topic, then it was never off-topic in the first place. You should have edited, instead of voting to close. – Cody Gray Sep 27 '17 at 4:36
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Because they can.

They don’t like competitors.

It’s a downvoting ring acting under tacit permission from the Stack Overflow management.

They’ll give you a thousand reasons why your question is “bad” just to get rid of it. Don’t think much of their “advice”, they are random justifications for the purpose of maintaining a veneer of legitimacy.

Another purpose of this practice is ensuring that new users are blindly obedient to the old users. What better way of testing user’s obedience than seeing whether he fulfills nonsensical requirements without resistance? Those who fail this test, get banned from Stack Overflow indefinitely without anyone ever knowing. Convenient, isn’t it?

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    Is this sarcasm? – BDL Sep 26 '17 at 18:06
  • @BDL: Social echo chambers are real. SO is a prime example of one. – 7vujy0f0hy Sep 26 '17 at 18:17
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    man, he got us busted. – yivi Sep 26 '17 at 18:24
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    and the downvotes on this post is clear proof of this, right? – user400654 Sep 26 '17 at 18:27
  • @KevinB: Yeah, a sudden onslaught of revenge downvotes on my old questions following this post must be my hallucination. – 7vujy0f0hy Sep 26 '17 at 19:09
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    Um yeah, kinda, except it's not a small group of people. It's a very large group of people. It is absolutely true that people can and do downvote questions for any reasons they like. On the other hand, the argument that they're doing it because "they don't like competitors" makes very little sense. Even if you suppose there's a cartel of high-rep users seeking to maintain their petty status, they won't be able to do it by preventing all new questions. Answering questions is how they earn that reputation in the first place. – Cody Gray Sep 27 '17 at 4:38
  • @CodyGray: I’ve never said it’s a small group. (The linked article says it but it’s only vaguely related to my post.) High-rep users can afford suppressing even the majority of new questions, especially those from non-servile users. Large groups of people are capable of “conspiracies” – the history abounds in examples. Hundreds of people participated in this lynch. They were never identified... But even without perfect secrecy, purposeful stupidity, ideology and censorship are just as good. AlsoCf.Millgram,Zimbardo – 7vujy0f0hy Sep 27 '17 at 11:10
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    Oh boy. So you're actually comparing questions getting closed on Stack Overflow to a lynch mob? That is...completely unacceptable. Try to avoid trivializing the struggle of an entire racial group when making your point. – Cody Gray Sep 27 '17 at 11:13
  • @CodyGray: Irrelevant objection. How about comparing it to a mafia? Or to the Soviet Union? If all else fails, are experiments by Millgram and Zimbardo “trivial” enough to serve as a model of Stack Overflow? Are analogies allowed? – 7vujy0f0hy Sep 27 '17 at 11:16
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    I would prefer that you simply made logical arguments and avoided extreme analogies. – Cody Gray Sep 27 '17 at 11:17
  • @CodyGray: I’m not saying Stack Overflow is a genocidal community, I’m saying that it’s a pathological community based on the same mechanisms as genocidal communities. Experiments by Millgram and Zimbardo are very good analogies. – 7vujy0f0hy Sep 27 '17 at 11:24
  • @CodyGray: You know, a good start would be not hiding abuses of authority and not censoring criticism under the guise of “curating quality information”. Make deleted contributions and bans accessible to the public for study. – 7vujy0f0hy Sep 27 '17 at 12:04
  • @CodyGray: I didn’t know it was possible to browse deleted content without having over 9000+ points of reputation. Apparently this Meta community doesn’t know this either (more). I’ve found one query purporting to extract ids of deleted posts... but it only returns ids of posts that haven’t been deleted. There is also this external page that has been frozen for years. I think ban secrecy protects the banning, not the banned. – 7vujy0f0hy Sep 27 '17 at 13:42
  • Oh, sorry. I was actually wrong. I thought the dumps included deleted content, but they don't. That request was declined by the team many years ago. I removed my incorrect comment. I would be perfectly content with making every action I've taken part of the public record. The only reason we can't do that is privacy concerns. As I did mention before, the purpose of this Meta site is to allow criticism and to discuss matters relating to the operation of the site, being as transparent as possible. – Cody Gray Sep 27 '17 at 13:49

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